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eBook THE FERMATA. download

by Nicholson Baker

eBook THE FERMATA. download ISBN: 0099500213
Author: Nicholson Baker
Publisher: VINTAGE BOOKS; Open Market Ed edition (1994)
Language: Portuguese Brazilian
Pages: 303
ePub: 1482 kb
Fb2: 1360 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: docx mobi mbr rtf
Category: Other

Acclaim for Nicholson Baker’s. Inventive, graphically eroti. ovely re-enactments of voyeuristic activity interlaced with satirical takes on high-tech lifestyle-imagine an X-rated Donald Barthelme.

Acclaim for Nicholson Baker’s. San Francisco Chronicle. Baker is a brilliant observer and describer, clever, occasionally disarming with his insights and always entertaining. Diane Johnson, Vogue. Mixes astonishing creativity with scenes of energetic eroticism. has elevated pornography to a literary level. Baker is like no other writer when it comes to sex.

Books by nicholson baker

Books by nicholson baker. It’s hard to find an analogue for Baker’s combination of intellectual playfulness and lyricism. The music of Erik Satie comes to mind. Also peanut butter and bacon weird and wonderful about which you can only say, Try it. You’ll like i. -Philadelphia Inquirer. Outrageously arousing, acrobatically stylish, The Fermata is a graphic, but good-natured peep deep into the ethical interstices of time, testosterone, and the furtive male imagination.

Nicholson Baker (born January 7, 1957) is an American novelist and essayist. His early novels such as The Mezzanine and Room Temperature were distinguished by their minute inspection of his characters' and narrators' stream of consciousness. Out of a total of ten fiction books, he also wrote three erotic novels: Vox, The Fermata and House of Holes.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Having turned phone sex into the subject of an astonishing national bestseller in Vox, Baker now outdoes himself with an outrageously arousing.

DH: And it reminded me of this book by Nicholson Baker. Are you familiar with his work? He wrote this novel called The Fermata?

DH: And it reminded me of this book by Nicholson Baker. Are you familiar with his work? He wrote this novel called The Fermata?

The Fermata, first unfolding itself for me in fourth grade, has been a lifelong distraction. I have wanted to keep it a secret, and as a result it has swallowed up large chunks of my personality.

The Fermata, first unfolding itself for me in fourth grade, has been a lifelong distraction. But I hope that will change now. Once, following a long lull, I found a way to get back into the Fold five or six times after I smashed my head into a parking meter in Philadelphia. I was thirteen or fourteen. We were staying at the Barclay Hotel; as a treat I was allowed to drink some watered-down wine with lunch. I drank more of it than the adults knew and found myself acting wild and flaily on the.

Having turned phone sex into the subject of an astonishing national bestseller in Vox, Baker now outdoes himself with an outrageously arousing, acrobatically stylish "X-rated sci-fi fantasy that leaves Vox seeming more like mere fiber-optic foreplay" (Seattle Times).

Paul Chowder is trying to write the introduction to a new anthology of rhyming verse, but hes having a hard time getting started. The result of his fitful struggles is The Anthologist, Nicholson Bakers brilliantly funny and exquisite love story about poetry. A New York Times Notable Book, 2009.

Nicholson Baker me. I had a whole free real weekday to do whatever I wanted; I could, for instance, and should, read a book.

The Fermata is the most risky of Nicholson Baker's emotional histories. Having turned phone sex into the subject of an astonishing national bestseller in Vox, Baker now outdoes himself with an outrageously arousing, acrobatically stylish "X-rated sci-fi fantasy that leaves Vox seeming more like mere fiber-optic foreplay" (Seattle Times). -San Francisco Chronicle.

Comments: (7)
Kriau
Baker's protagonist, Arno Strine, calls the pornographic stories he writes "rot", short for "erotica" but also suggesting a British term for "nonsense" or "baloney". This is clearly a description of the book itself -- not to be taken seriously, but enjoyable nonetheless. Most of the book is a series of unrelated fantasies. Every hetero male will recognize their essence -- man sees pretty woman at the office; man sees pretty woman sunbathing at the beach; man sees pretty woman driving on the highway; man is examined by pretty female doctor -- but Baker develops them in original and witty ways.
The novelty is that Arno is magically endowed with the intermittent power to stop time for everyone except himself. This being a sex fantasy, Arno does not use his power to rob banks, perform instantaneous surgery, embarrass corrupt officials, rescue people from burning buildings, etc. -- all he does is take off women's clothes and write about it. There isn't any plot to speak of, and not much character development. Arno himself is quite believable, but the women he strips, as is traditional for erotic literature, are just scenery. If this bothers you, then look elsewhere; but if you take it for what it is, you will likely be both titillated and entertained.
Karon
I have to admit that this is my favorite Nicholson Baker book by far. It is positively obscene, so if that bugs you then skip this review and forget about reading the book.
To everyone else: this is one of the funniest, weirdest and most endearing books I have ever read. It doesn't have a lot in the way of plot, but the theme and Baker's prose more than make up for it. As a previous reviewer mentioned, Baker has more words for the various parts of the female body than Eskimos have for snow. My favorite is "jamaicas", but I'm not telling what it means.
If you like Baker's style (and I would say that this is closer in style to the Mezannine than Vox, minus the footnotes) then there's a lot to like about this book. Highly recommended.
Nern
Nicholson Baker immediately grabbed me with his "character can stop time" premise. Really immediate. Like Page One immediate. There aren't a lot of authors that can pull that off, so my hopes for "The Fermata" were high. My interest level remained high as he explored the premise in extreme detail. We all know what men would do with such a power, but how would things like light, sound, electricity, and photography be affected? Baker gives us these fun little details, but he quickly settles in to the book's real focus: hard core erotica. Because I hadn't read any reviews beforehand, it was not exactly what I was expecting.

The first half of the book is a mix of time-control curiosities and sexual titillation. The second half of the book abandons most of the science fiction element and keeps only the erotica. Main character Arno Strine fancies himself an amateur erotic author. Fine. This aspect of the book fills in character details and provides motivations. My objections come from (I'm not exaggerating here) _entire_chapters_ devoted to Arno's amateur porn. The book's premise becomes completely inverted...it's only purpose is to provide author Nicholson Baker with a respectable literary cloak for publishing porn.

The story line becomes so outlandish towards the end, the character dialogue and interactions so ridiculous, that I thought perhaps it would end by revealing that the narrator was simply delusional. If that's what the reader was meant to infer, Baker certainly made no effort to make it easy for them.

Baker's a good author in terms of style. He creates a very credible voice for his protagonist, but what he does with that voice was just too over the top for me. Given his talent and unique treatment of the whole time travel/control fantasy, this book could have been so much more. That's why it's ultimately so dissatisfying.
Xtreem
I don't know how I managed to get this far through life without ever having come across Nicholson Baker before. A friend recommended him, saying my work reminded her of his style. I was deeply flattered.

It's supposedly erotic, but this isn't masturbation fodder. It will bring you to orgasmic levels of laughter, however.

If you'd like to build your vocabulary, get the Kindle version so you can highlight his many unusual words and get the definitions.

Now I'm in the process of reading everything he has written. I haven't done that since Steinbeck.
Galanjov
This is a book you will read more than once. Over the years, I have. Make sure when you lend it to your friends, you get it back! I recently ordered a new copy because mine has disappeared again, among my women friends who poo-poo the subject but are nontheless fascinated by the read.

How does a man who stops time use his great gift? In pursuit of his own personal happiness which is directly tied to his physical appreciation of women. In The Fermata, the protagonist, Arno, absolutely loves women -- it comes across in every lust-imbued word -- women of all body types, skin textures and ages. He falls in love regularly, as he keenly observes them and attempts to touch them in more than a physical way; he attempts to imprint their psyches anonymously with his admiration for them. The good reader will remove herself from judgment of Arno's decision-action tandem, suspend questions of self-determination by all the women from which Arno removes those questions, and enjoy immersing her own imagination in the thoughts of this considerate, intellectual man whose sexual appetites are permitted free reign (within his own strict morality of sorts) to manifest themselves. So many moments in the book are equally profoundly philosophical and hilariously profane, like when he tests out a small sex toy on himself to see how it would feel on a woman so that the result is just right. Arno wants this stranger to have a hidden and secret pleasure and goes to great ends to see it occur, while at the same time showing great concern for her comfort through his anonymity.

Love it!