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eBook We All Went to Paris: Americans in the City of Light, 1776-1971 download

by Stephen Longstreet

eBook We All Went to Paris:  Americans in the City of Light, 1776-1971 download ISBN: 0760762082
Author: Stephen Longstreet
Publisher: Barnes & Noble; 1st edition (2004)
Language: English
Pages: 448
ePub: 1388 kb
Fb2: 1322 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw lrf mobi azw
Category: Other

Stephen Longstreet, himself once a habitué of the boulevards, boîtes, and cafés of Paris, draws on letters, newspapers, journals, and unpublished material to depict the unique charms that have led Americans to work there, play there, and in many cases, stay there

Stephen Longstreet, himself once a habitué of the boulevards, boîtes, and cafés of Paris, draws on letters, newspapers, journals, and unpublished material to depict the unique charms that have led Americans to work there, play there, and in many cases, stay there. We All Went to Paris is a boisterous chronicle of dozens of famous and infamous Americans-geniuses and poseurs, society women and swindlers-who flocked to Paris and added their own special glow to the City of Light.

Longstreet, Stephen, 1907-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on July 19, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Longstreet's book, Nell Kimball: Her Life as an American Madam, by herself, is a hoax biography that was partly plagiarized from the works of Herbert . We All Went to Paris: Americans in the City of Light, 1776-1971 (1972). Chicago, 1860-1919 (1973)

Longstreet's book, Nell Kimball: Her Life as an American Madam, by herself, is a hoax biography that was partly plagiarized from the works of Herbert Asbury, as was his novel The Wilder Shore from Ashbury's The Barbary Coast. Longstreet's nonfiction works include San Francisco, '49 to '06 and Chicago: 1860 to 1920, as well as A Century on Wheels, The Story of Studebaker and a Jewish cookbook, The Joys of Jewish Cooking, that he wrote with his wife and occasional collaborator, Ethel We All Went to Paris: Americans in the City of Light, 1776-1971 (1972). Chicago, 1860-1919 (1973). with Ethel Longstreet: The Joys of Jewish Cooking (1974).

Originally published in 1972 by Macmillan (New York). Illustrated with black-and-white drawings. America's fascination with Paris began even before we became a nation. Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson spent agreeable afternoons in its salons and shops-as well as long hours attending to their diplomatic missions. For them, whether to stay in Paris or return home was not an easy choice.

Saved in: Main Author: Longstreet, Stephen, 1907-. Subjects: Americans France Paris.

Home LONGSTREET, Stephen We All Went to Paris. in NF price-clipped dustwrapper. A tight, clean copy of this well-produced book of remembrances of "Americans in the City of Light 1776 - 1971". We All Went to Paris. Published by Macmillan, NY, 1972. Illustrated by the author. Bookseller Inventory 002090. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Title: We All Went to Paris. Publisher: Macmillan, NY. Publication Date: 1972. Book Condition: NF. Store Description. Visit Seller's Storefront.

Americans in the City of Light, 1776-1971. by Stephen Longstreet. France, Paris, Paris (France). Published 1972 by Macmillan in New York. Americans, History, Social life and customs. 448 p. Number of pages.

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Stephen LONGSTREET, We All Went to Paris - Americans in the City of Light 1776-1971, McMillan, New York, 1972. Brian . ORTON, Americans in Paris- An Anecdotal Street Guide, The Olivia & Hill, 1984. Brian N. MORTON, Americans in Paris, The Olivia & Hillm Press, Ann Arbor, 1984. More to come Not to mention Woody Allen and Jerry Lewis, some movie directors are more popular in France : David Lynch, Samuel Fuller, John Cassavetes, et. .

Originally published in 1972 by Macmillan (New York). Illustrated with black-and-white drawings. America's fascination with Paris began even before we became a nation. Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson spent agreeable afternoons in its salons and shops--as well as long hours attending to their diplomatic missions. For them, whether to stay in Paris or return home was not an easy choice. Ever since, thousands of extraordinary Americans have faced a similar dilemma.