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Gilbert Din's book is a specialist study, less about slavery than about Spanish colonial administration in Louisiana. He provides the first authoritative and comprehensive examination of shipboard revolts in the Atlantic Slave Trade

Gilbert Din's book is a specialist study, less about slavery than about Spanish colonial administration in Louisiana. He provides the first authoritative and comprehensive examination of shipboard revolts in the Atlantic Slave Trade.

Spaniards, Planters, and Slaves is the first in its field to capture the years of Spanish rule as a specific and unique point in Louisiana's history of slavery. It is an ideal study for anyone interested in the history of both colonial Louisiana and slavery itself.

He argues that slavery in Louisiana under the Spanish was somewhat less harsh, relatively speaking, than it had been .

He argues that slavery in Louisiana under the Spanish was somewhat less harsh, relatively speaking, than it had been under the French before or would be under the Americans after them. Although the focus of Din's book is Spanish slave policy, the author appears to be equally concerned with showing how previous studies by such scholars as Gwendolyn Midlo Hall have exaggerated the degree of slave resistance and self-determination during Louisiana's colonial era.

Following Robert Cavelier de La Salle establishing the French claim to the territory and the introduction of the name Louisiana, the first settlements in the southernmost portion of Louisiana (New France) were developed at present-day Biloxi (1699),.

Following Robert Cavelier de La Salle establishing the French claim to the territory and the introduction of the name Louisiana, the first settlements in the southernmost portion of Louisiana (New France) were developed at present-day Biloxi (1699), Mobile (1702), Natchitoches (1714), and New Orleans (1718). Slavery was then established by European colonists.

subsequent Spanish governors were those affecting the regulation of slavery. Such alterations, introduced by a regime as. Catholic as the one it displaced, reflected different traditions regarding slavery in the Old and New Worlds, just as did. the Anglo-American practices to which Louisiana became subject after its incorporation into the United States after. As a territory governed by three distinct powers, Louisiana is thus an ideal setting in which to examine how. national cultures, especially law and religion, shaped the character of slavery in one area of the New World.

He is the author of Spaniards, Planters, and Slaves: The Spanish Regulation of Slavery in Louisiana, 1763–1803, which won the General L. Kemper and Leila Williams Award for the best book on Louisiana history. View on Bookdepository.

and Slaves: The Spanish Regulation of Slavery in Louisiana, 1763-1803 (College Station . Slave and Citizen Tannenbaum's insightfulbook generateda passionate,if not alwaysproOne debatein the decadesfollowingits publication. ductive,historiographic and were scrutinized in manycases modified, by one, his mainarguments for The and criticized,or rejectedaltogether. issue of precedents traditions, instance, was challengedearly on by anthropologist Sidney Mintz,who world. Mintz y weretrulyabsentin the non-Iberian in found evidence to the contrary the s, whichwere thattherewas.

The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2016. Published: 2018-03-07, Author(s): Douglas R. Egerton. A Saga of the New South: Race, Law, and Public Debt in Virginia. Published: 2017-11-30, Author(s): Douglas R. Freneau, Philip Morin (1752-1832), poet and polemicist Published: 2017-11-29, Author(s): Douglas R.

In 1758, Bouligny enlisted in the Spanish army, joining the Regiment of Zamora. Spaniards, Planters, and Slaves: The Spanish Regulation of Slavery in Louisiana, 1763-1803. Texas A&M University Press. A year later, he transferred to the Royal Regiment of Spanish Guards and was commissioned as a lieutenant in the infantry and sent to Havana, Cuba, in 1762.