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eBook Palestine mission: A personal record (America and the Holy Land) download

by R. H. S Crossman

eBook Palestine mission: A personal record (America and the Holy Land) download ISBN: 0405102402
Author: R. H. S Crossman
Publisher: Arno Press (1977)
Language: English
Pages: 210
ePub: 1713 kb
Fb2: 1904 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Category: Other

Palestine Mission book. Palestine Mission: A Personal Record (America and the Holy Land).

Palestine Mission book. 0405102402 (ISBN13: 9780405102400).

Palestine Mission: A Personal Record New York: Harper (1947). Catalogue of Crossman's papers, held at the Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick. A Nation Reborn New York: Atheneum (1960). Newspaper clippings about Richard Crossman in the 20th Century Press Archives of the ZBW.

The continuing relationship between America and the Holy Land has implications for American and Jewish history which extend beyond the historical narrative and interpretation. The devotion of Americans of all faiths to the Holy Land extends into the spiritual realm, and the Holy Land, in turn, penetrates American homes, patterns of faith, and education.

Richard Crossman, Palestine Mission: A Personal Record (late 1947) He articulately analyses the volatile post-war politics of the Middle East and the emerging eastern and western power blocks

Richard Crossman, Palestine Mission: A Personal Record (late 1947).

Informationen zum Titel Palestine mission von R. H. S. Crossman aus der Reihe America and the Holy Land book content. htm last update: 11/20/2019.

Inventing the Holy Land: American Protestant Pilgrimage to Palestine, 1865–1941. Following a long colonialist tradition, the film presents Zionism as fulfilling a 'civilising mission' with regard to the indigenous Arab population (the 'Canaanites' of the biblical narrative). By RogersStephanie Stidham. To further strengthen this reading, the film shows that the native Arabs actually welcomed the Jews and even gave them the land of Palestine voluntarily as an act of gratitude for the progress they brought to this undeveloped corner of the world.

A Mission to Palestine. After a long and arduous trip fraught with suffering and personal sacrifice, Elder Hyde arrived in Jerusalem. On Sunday, 24 October 1841, Elder Hyde climbed the Mount of Olives, and just as he had seen in the vision, offered a heavenly inspired dedicatory prayer. Within a few years of Orson Hyde’s mission to the Holy Land, David Roberts visited the same area, painting what he saw. This scene is of Jerusalem from the Bethany road on the Mount of Olives.

But the same electrical charge which caused the Holy Land as sacred space to provoke diverse and at times contradictory . 10 See, most recently, Phillips, . Defenders of the Holy Land: Relations between the Latin East and the West, 1119-1187 (Oxford, 1996).

But the same electrical charge which caused the Holy Land as sacred space to provoke diverse and at times contradictory responses, endowed the Holy Land as idea with a remarkable attraction. There took place a number of different ‘migrations of the holy’, to use John Bossy’s phrase. To a large extent the status of the geographical Holy Land was weakened by these developments, but in at least one respect it was strengthened. 11 Smail,, ‘International status’, and see too his ‘Latin Syria and the West, 1149-1187’, TRHS, ser.

Comments: (2)
Braswyn
Used; as described.
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Richard Crossman, “Palestine Mission: A Personal Record” (late 1947). Partial book review comments from a Jan. 1997 article by Esen Tufan:

“He was a British member of the “Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry” [c. Jan. 1946]. The Anglo-American Committee was appointed by the British and American Governments to examine political, economic and social conditions in Palestine as they bear upon the problem of the Jewish immigration and settlement. The committee consisted of six non-official citizens of the two countries…..

“The examined book is Richard Crossman's personal account of the inquiry….. Richard Crossman makes an eloquent account of the 120-day he has spent as part of the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry. The task of the committee is sensibly reported sequentially with appropriate reciprocal explanations and analysis…..

“Mr. Crossman brilliantly recapitulates the prevailing post war political climate. He articulately analyses the volatile post-war politics of the Middle East and the emerging eastern and western power blocks. His historical association of the world Jewry to the land of Palestine though is rather perfunctory…..

“The author perceptibly describes the change of scenery once the committee moved from Washington to London; but he devotes the London hearings entirely to the Zionists and the Zionist cause. Lord Samuel, the former high commissioner's speech in favour of a cantonal system is overlooked. Arab witnesses are also not referred to….

“In Lausanne he cites the political impracticability of a unitary Palestine in justification of his demands for partition. But it is evident that he had become a willing Zionist instrument whose clear aim was the conversion of an Arab country into a Jewish country. The majority of the committee members though were convinced that the Jews and the Arabs could live together in peace….

“B. Crum was the only other commissioner to give a subsequent personal account of their mission (“Behind the Silken Curtain”, New York, 1947)….
“The story of the Committee's deliberations is a fascinating historian's quarry in the substance and subtleties of the confrontation it examined. It is evident that Mr. Crossman has examined the issues and themes with knowledge and perception. In final analysis; despite his biased views, which after all is his prerogative, Mr. Crossman has provided posterity with an invaluable primary source.”