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eBook Plenty download

by David Hare

eBook Plenty download ISBN: 0571112390
Author: David Hare
Publisher: Faber (1978)
Language: English
Pages: 87
ePub: 1264 kb
Fb2: 1328 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit rtf mobi docx
Category: Other

Plenty is a play by David Hare, first performed in 1978, about British post-war disillusion.

Plenty is a play by David Hare, first performed in 1978, about British post-war disillusion. Hare's inspiration for Plenty came from the fact that 75 per cent of the women engaged in wartime SOE operations divorced in the immediate post-war years; the title is derived from the idea that the post-war era would be a time of "plenty", which proved untrue for most of England.

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Все продавцы . Plenty. Результаты поиска по книге. Probably Hare's best play, showing through the disillusionment of a female SoE agent how the fine clear morality of WWII descended in the 1940s and 1950s into compromises and dishonesty in English.

David Hare was born in Sussex, England in 1947. His first play, Slag, was produced in 1970. In 1982, Hare founded a film company, Greenpoint Films. He has written several screenplays including Plenty (1985), Weatherby (1985), Strapless (1989), and Damage (1992)

David Hare was born in Sussex, England in 1947. His other works include Plenty (1978), A Map of the World (1983), and Pravda (1985). He has written several screenplays including Plenty (1985), Weatherby (1985), Strapless (1989), and Damage (1992). Several of his best-known plays, The Secret Rapture, Racing Demon, Skylight, The Judas Kiss, Via Dolorosa and Amy's View have been presented on Broadway.

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An introduction to Plenty by David Hare. Plenty Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections: Introduction. Learn about the book and the historical context in which it was written.

David Hare's first full-length play was produced in 1970. Since then he has written over thirty stage plays and twenty-five screenplays for film and television. The plays include Plenty, Pravda (with Howard Brenton), The Secret Rapture, Racing Demon, Skylight, Amy's View, The Blue Room, Via Dolorosa, Stuff Happens, The Absence of War, The Judas Kiss, The Red Barn and The Moderate Soprano.

This play ran at the National Theatre, London, throughout 1978 and the New York production in the autumn of 1982 was equally well received

This play ran at the National Theatre, London, throughout 1978 and the New York production in the autumn of 1982 was equally well received. In counterpointing the experiences of an Englishwoman helping the French Resistance during the war with her life in the following twenty years, the author offers a unique view of postwar history, as well as making a powerful statement about changing values and the collapse of ideals embodied in a single life

Hong plays character Alice Park, David plays Raymond Brock and Lesley plays Susan Traherne at Plenty .

Hong plays character Alice Park, David plays Raymond Brock and Lesley plays Susan Traherne at Plenty (Scene ) in City Lit. It is about a young Englishwoman spends 20 years to make whatever kind of life for herself at the expense of others around her in post-World War 2 England.

This play ran at the National Theatre, London, throughout 1978 and the New York production in the autumn of 1982 was equally well received. In counterpointing the experiences of an Englishwoman helping the French Resistance during the war with her life in the following twenty years, the author offers a unique view of postwar history, as well as making a powerful statement about changing values and the collapse of ideals embodied in a single life.

Plenty is also a major film produced by Edward R. Pressman and Joseph Papp with Mark Seiler as Executive Producer, and directed by Fred Schepisi from a screenplay by David Hare. The cast, headed by double Oscar-winner Meryl Streep, includes Charles Dance, Tracy Ullman, John Gielgud, Sting, Ian McKellen and Sam Neill.

Comments: (2)
Ger
David Hare’s PLENTY opened in London in 1978 and in New York in 1983. Although it is more of a critic’s darling than a popular ticket, it has received several major revivals and is perhaps most widely known as a 1985 film starring Meryl Streep. The play requires five women and eight men and is performed in twelve scenes, each requiring a full set change, over two acts.

PLENTY shifts backward and forward in time. The play begins in 1962 with a scene that finds forty-year old Susan Treherne and friend Alice Parks in an empty house with Susan’s naked and unconscious husband Raymond—a circumstance that is not explained. The next scene occurs in 1943 in France. Thereafter the scenes fall sequentially until the play’s conclusion, when the opening scene is revolved and the play suddenly shifts to 1944 and the war’s conclusion.

The play itself focuses on Susan, who was an English courier behind enemy lines in World War II France. When the war ends, Susan’s reality fails to measure up to her war time experiences. She attempts to fill the gap with bohemian friends, work, the notion of having a child, but each effort unravels until she marries Raymond Brock, a rising member of the British diplomatic corps. Even so, her dissatisfaction gradually segues into fits of insanity that have the effect of destroying her husband’s career. There is no easy answer for Susan, and the play ends on an unresolved note, leaving us to wonder how she will cope—and indeed, if she is able to.

PLENTY is a strange play, written (in the author’s description) in such a way as to present the reader with an ambiguous reaction to Susan in each of the twelve scenes. It is often difficult to like her; at the same time, it is also often difficult to blame her for her inability to adjust to the post-war world. At the same time, the plot and the dialogue spirals around itself, creating, answering, and sometimes ignoring questions and issues that arose in earlier scenes until everything seems to click into place at the play’s conclusion, where we are at last able to see Susan fully. The play is famous for its symbolic nature, with Susan’s post-war losses reflecting the post-war decline of the British Empire.

Plays are generally written to be performed, not read, and I think that is very true of PLENTY. It is difficult to imagine how the script plays on the stage. This is a script best left to those who have a knowledge of the theatre; all others should see the play in performance.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer
Frostdefender
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