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by Alvin. Plantinga

eBook God, Freedom, and Evil download ISBN: 0061318116
Author: Alvin. Plantinga
Publisher: HarperCollins (paper); First Paperback edition (May 1975)
Language: English
ePub: 1330 kb
Fb2: 1494 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Mind you this a philosophical argument for the so-called problem of evil, Plantinga himself states that this book is not for a pastoral response. The second part of the book discusses natural theology.

Mind you this a philosophical argument for the so-called problem of evil, Plantinga himself states that this book is not for a pastoral response. Plantinga, I think, does a good job with the Ontological Argument for God.

Alvin Plantinga's free-will defense is a logical argument developed by the American analytic philosopher Alvin Plantinga and published in its final version in his 1977 book God, Freedom, and Evil

Alvin Plantinga's free-will defense is a logical argument developed by the American analytic philosopher Alvin Plantinga and published in its final version in his 1977 book God, Freedom, and Evil. Plantinga's argument is a defense against the logical problem of evil as formulated by the philosopher J. L. Mackie beginning in 1955

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Reprint of the ed. published by Harper & Row, New York, issued in series: Basic conditions of life and as TB 1811 of Harper torchbooks. Includes bibliographical references. I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today.

23 quotes from Alvin Plantinga: 'Suppose we concede that if I had been born of Muslim parents in Morocco rather than Christian parents in. .The existence of God is neither precluded nor rendered improbable by the existence of evil.

23 quotes from Alvin Plantinga: 'Suppose we concede that if I had been born of Muslim parents in Morocco rather than Christian parents in Michigan, my beliefs would be quite different. If the pluralist had been born in he probably wouldn't be a pluralist. Of course, suffering and misfortune may nonetheless constitute a problem for the theist; but the problem is not that his beliefs are logically or probabilistically incompatible.

Plantinga's well-received book God, Freedom and Evil, written in 1974, gave his response to what he saw as the incomplete . Plantinga discusses his view of Reformed epistemology and proper functionalism in a three-volume series.

Plantinga's well-received book God, Freedom and Evil, written in 1974, gave his response to what he saw as the incomplete and uncritical view of theism's criticism of theodicy. Plantinga's contribution stated that when the issue of a comprehensive doctrine of freedom is added to the discussion of the goodness of God and the omnipotence of God then it is not possible to exclude the presence of evil in the world after introducing freedom into the discussion.

For Plantinga, the atheist must do more to assert such a claim. 4 In painstaking detail, Plantinga engages J. L Mackie on this topic from an intellectual standpoint. Plantinga distinguishes between the intellectual problem of evil and pastoral problem of evil, of which the former is the subject he is prepared to deal with in his book. 5 The bulk of the book is dedicated to exploring the problem of evil in its various logical out workings.

Home Browse Books Book details, God, Freedom, and Evil. This book discusses and exemplifies the philosophy of religion, or philosophical reflection on central themes of religion. God, Freedom, and Evil. Philosophical reflection (which is not much different from just thinking hard) on these themes has a long history: it dates back at least as far as the fifth century . when some of the Greeks thought long and hard about the religion they had received from their ancestors.

This is my first post about a philosophical book. Alvin Plantinga is considered by many the most influential Christian philosopher alive, so this is going to be a hard task

This is my first post about a philosophical book. Alvin Plantinga is considered by many the most influential Christian philosopher alive, so this is going to be a hard task. He splits the book in two parts: the first one to respond to atheological (atheist?) arguments; the second to provide a theological argument for the existence of God. This text will focus only on the first part where he talks about the problem of evil and freedom of the will. One good thing to differentiate, right in the beginning of the book, is the.

Comments: (7)
Hystana
Truly the best work on the subject. CS Lewis’ The Problem of Pain would be the primer to this, in my opinion. Masterful work that should be owned by anyone seeking a better understanding of this issue.
artman
There are other reviews who better explain why this book is a good read, but in short... His free will defense (not a theodicy, brilliant!) demonstrates that God's omnipotence, complete goodness and the existence of evil are not incompatible. Mind you this a philosophical argument for the so-called problem of evil, Plantinga himself states that this book is not for a pastoral response. The second part of the book discusses natural theology. Plantinga, I think, does a good job with the Ontological Argument for God. I used to think that it was the most fallacious argument for God, but now I think it is good argument (especially if coupled with William Lane Craig's Kalam Cosmological Argument).
Anayajurus
Alvin Planting is a uniquely gifted thinker and writer. He is not easy reading, but careful reading rewards those who do it. I plan to go through this book as many times as I need to,to gain mastery of his arguments. What I have learned so far has already delivered me from a negative cast of mind that has troubled me for many years. Plantinga writes philosophy that doesn't just inform, it helps you to live.
Hawk Flying
Essential reading--one of the classics in modern philosophy of religion. Plantinga's presentation of the "free will defense" against the problem of evil takes up the first part of the book. Contra philosophers like J.L. Mackie and numerous others who have argued that the existence of evil is logically incompatible with the creation of the world by an omniscient, omnipotent, and omnibenevolent God, Plantinga forcefully argues for the logical possibility that such a God could not have created a world in which beings with significant moral freedom always choose the good, and that therefore, any world created by such a God will contain some degree of evil unless it be populated by beings lacking significant moral freedom. Since the good of moral freedom can be believed logically to outweigh the evil that results from exercise of that freedom, the existence of evil in the world is logically compatible with the existence of the posited God. Plantinga makes it very clear that this is not a theodicy--not an attempt to "justify" the actions of God re the evil in the world--but is rather merely an attempt to show that those who believe that belief in both God and evil is not inherently illogical. While some philosophers have raised issues with the particular model of free will advocated by Plantinga (an incompatibilist model, over against the "compatibilism" of thinkers like Mackie and Antony Flew), most have accepted that Plantinga's free will defense does provide a logically satisfactory response to the problem of evil.

The second part of the book is Plantinga's presentation of the ontological argument for the existence of God. Here, Plantinga is (it seems to me) far less persuasive. His modal version of the argument is in some ways more refined than the classic version of St. Anselm, but I find it even more obviously tautological. Plantinga's, like all ontological arguments, boils down to an assertion that any being who exists necessarily, exists. But this is obvious. The modal ontological argument offers no additional evidence that there is such a thing as a
necessary being.
Deodorant for your language
Plantiga does a top notch job in his theodicy, building the foundation of his thesis thoroughly, and continuing through his content in a lean, fast, and ultimately superior manner than many who have come before him. He makes you think hard and for those who try he creates the conditions for tangential theorizing. A profound and intelligent book.
Priotian
Alvin Plantinga is perhaps the most brilliant and influential Christian philosopher alive today, and all of that brilliance is on display in "God, Freedom and Evil". This is not an easy read, even though it is said to be one of his more popularly accessible works, it is still not light reading. Plantinga has said that philosophy is just thinking very hard about something, and, unless you are a professional philosopher, that is exactly what you will be doing as you read this book. However, don't let that deter you; be willing to think hard about the arguments you'll find in this book, and your faith and intellect will be enriched.
Hilarious Kangaroo
For those who are actually interested in why there is evil when God is good, this is recommended. It shows that what we call evil is often the result of our own choices, and God allows us to have free will.
In the first half of this book, Plantinga attempts to provide a plausible logical reason for the existence of evil. By using logic and philosophy Plantinga presents the free will defense for the existence of evil. The book is hard to follow if you do not use bookmarks or have a good memory though. He often refers to previously mentioned lines by letter or number reference. this is done to avoid unneeded repetition but it can become cumbersome to follow if you do not take your time with it.

The second half of this book is a complete waste of time though. Plantinga basically says the teleological and cosmological arguments are a waste of time then goes on to present the ontological argument. The major problem with this is he spends much of the second portion supporting a position and then concludes with the failure of that position

If you are interested in a logical philosophical presentation of the free will defense, this is the book for you. If not, steer clear of this one.