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eBook Gladys: Duchess of Marlborough download

by Hugo Vickers

eBook Gladys: Duchess of Marlborough download ISBN: 0030447518
Author: Hugo Vickers
Publisher: Holt, Rinehart and Winston; 1st edition (1980)
Language: English
Pages: 308
ePub: 1941 kb
Fb2: 1868 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lit txt doc lit
Category: Other

Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough. Marlborough, Gladys Spencer-Churchill, Duchess of, 1881-1977, Nobility.

Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough. New York : Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by JoeOndreicka on September 22, 2009. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Gladys Marie Spencer-Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough (née Deacon; 7 February 1881 – 13 October 1977) was a French American aristocrat and socialite. She was the mistress and later the second wife of Charles Spencer-Churchill, 9th Duke of Marlborough. Born in Paris, Gladys Marie Deacon was the daughter of American citizens Edward Deacon and his wife Florence, daughter of Admiral Charles H. Baldwin. She had three sisters, and a brother who died in infancy

Hugo Vickers is a writer, lecturer and broadcaster, and an acknowledged expert on the British Royal Family. He has written biographies of the Queen Mother, Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough, Cecil Beaton, Vivien Leigh, Princess Andrew of Greece and the Duchess of Windsor.

Hugo Vickers is a writer, lecturer and broadcaster, and an acknowledged expert on the British Royal Family. The Sphinx has been a forty-year journey for him since his first meeting with Gladys Deacon in 1975.

Hardcover book about the Duchess Gladys of Marlborough. In Gladys, Vickers gets bogged down with name dropping to the point of ad nauseam. The index is packed with names that appear only once or twice as guests at this house party or that dinner. These names are not of well known people, and they should have been omitted. Gladys is divided into thirds with most of the book dedicated to the years of her birth until the duke dies in 1934. The last section, which covers the long span of her last 44 years, is only a mere 37 pages. There are many questions about her life during this period that go unanswered

The Dowager Duchess of Marlborough moved with her dogs first to north Oxfordshire and later to the Grange Farm at Chacombe. She started retreating from the world and eventually became a complete recluse.

The Dowager Duchess of Marlborough moved with her dogs first to north Oxfordshire and later to the Grange Farm at Chacombe. By 1962, she had become mentally ill, much like her father and paternal grandmother, and was forcibly moved to St Andrew's Hospital, where she died, aged 96. Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough: the aristocrat with attitude. Her beauty and fierce intelligence left Proust and Rodin obsessed, and the upper-classes besotted. Then why did the vivacious Gladys Deacon die a recluse?

Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough Hardcover – July 2, 1987.

Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough Hardcover – July 2, 1987. by. Hugo Vickers (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

According to her biographer Hugo Vickers, American Gladys Deacon, the second wife of the 9th Duke of Marlborough (1881-1977) has remained until now a part of Blenheim Palace’s history which the guides left out. "We don’t talk about her", Vickers was told

According to her biographer Hugo Vickers, American Gladys Deacon, the second wife of the 9th Duke of Marlborough (1881-1977) has remained until now a part of Blenheim Palace’s history which the guides left out. "We don’t talk about her", Vickers was told. Undeterred, 22 year old Vickers set about tracking down the 94 year old Duchess. Instead of the sumptuous surrounding of Blenheim, he found her held in a secure ward of St Andrew’s Hospital in Northampton, once the Northampton County Lunatic Asylum for the Middle and Upper Classes for the admission of ‘private and pauper lunatics’.

Gladys, Duchess Of Marlborough book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Gladys, Duchess Of Marlborough as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Hugo Vickers.

Gladys became Duchess of Marlborough in 1921 at 40 years of age. In a letter to the duke she wrote: "Am I not the last of. .Hugo Vickers is an author who has written several books about 20th century figures, including 'Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough' (1979). Bookmark with: Delicious. In a letter to the duke she wrote: "Am I not the last of the Marlborough gems? Greek in temper with a more modern dash about certain parts?" That infamous temper soon came to the fore and the duke and his wife started to drift apart as her behaviour became more erratic. Mr Vickers explained: "At one point she came down to dinner and placed a revolver on the table.

Gladys Deacon Duchess of Marlborough. What others are saying. Giovanni Boldini Madame Leclanche 1881 oil on Canvas. Hugo is the biographer of the Duke of Marlborough's second wife, Gladys Deacon, who was an American socialite and great friend of Consuelo Vanderbilt, the Duke's first wife. The palace is filled with illuminati symbolism. It is said, the aristocracy have been heading the Illuminati since their existence.

Hardcover book about the Duchess Gladys of Marlborough.
Comments: (6)
Manris
Arriving in excellent time and condition (kudos to dealer) this compendium of a most unusual woman was extremely satisfying. It was detailed and jaunty - everything you'd expect from Mr. Vickers. It might be a bit dry for those who aren't familiar with the time frame and the players in it, but it was otherwise an excellent journey into the life and times of a woman whose life line crossed the most unique periods of time and often stood above them.
Longitude Temporary
I absolutely loved this book..a glamorous and fascinating woman..great read!
Legend 33
Great book
Framokay
Good
Lilegha
SO enjoyed this book. What a fascinating life.
Dishadel
In Gladys: Duchess of Marlborough, Hugo Vickers once again provides us with an engaging subject, but makes it less so with his writing. Gladys is a story that ranges from memorable to haunting to tragic.

Gladys Deacon was born in Paris in 1881 to American parents. The Deacons were wealthy enough to be able to live in Europe, although they weren't in league with the Astor's or the Vanderbilt's. Still, they lived life as if on a perpetual vacation. Gladys was one of the great beauties of her generation. She also possessed a cutting wit, a sharp intelligence and was a brilliant conversationalist. Unfortunately, she was also self-absorbed, vain, jealous, petty, a liar, a user and undependable. She loved the power she had from preying on the emotions of others--especially the many men who fell under her spell. She loved the arts, mythology, poetry and literature, and had many famous men and women among her admirers including Proust, Monet, Rodin, Epstein, Boldini, Trevelyan, etc. She had marriage proposals too numerous to count from dukes, earls and royal princes. From the time she was 14, she laments that Consuelo Vanderbilt was to marry the Duke of Marlborough and claims that "if only I was a little older I might `catch' him."

Life for the idle rich at this time was the "pursuit of happiness," and Gladys spent her days going from one stop to another--almost always staying with others. Her travels brought her into the orbit of the Marlborough's (Consuelo and Sunny). At first, Consuelo and Sunny were captivated by Gladys. But soon enough, their marriage crumbled and Gladys becomes Sunny's mistress. They finally married in 1921 with disastrous results.

In Gladys, Vickers gets bogged down with name dropping to the point of ad nauseam. The index is packed with names that appear only once or twice as guests at this house party or that dinner. These names are not of well known people, and they should have been omitted. Gladys is divided into thirds with most of the book dedicated to the years of her birth until the duke dies in 1934. The last section, which covers the long span of her last 44 years, is only a mere 37 pages. There are many questions about her life during this period that go unanswered. For instance, who had her committed to a psychiatric hospital? And where did she get the money to live? Vickers claims that Gladys received no Marlborough money after the duke's death, but I've read elsewhere that her husband's heirs supported her until her own death. Also, there were some minor research errors. The cottage of Gladys' grandmother in Newport, RI was not directly across the street from Marble House (the childhood summer home of Consuelo Vanderbilt Marlborough).

Still, I enjoyed reading about one of the most famous women of this time period, who is now a relative unknown. This riches to rags story is definitely haunting and as someone said, you should be careful what you wish for as you just might get it. Gladys paid a heavy price for wanting to wear a coronet, and in the process, lost her beauty, her fortune, her friends, her freedom and as some would claim, her sanity.