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eBook Kapitalizm: Russia's Struggle to Free Its Economy download ISBN: 0585354847
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has been added to your Cart. As Business Week's Moscow bureau chief from 1989 to 1993, Brady collected interviews from government officials Yegor Gaidar, Anatoly Chubais and Boris Nemtsov.

The book ends in early 1997, when Russia's future still looked relatively rosy?before the August 1998 financial . This is an fabulous book on how Russia turned from state socialism into a fragile, but market-based economy.

The book ends in early 1997, when Russia's future still looked relatively rosy?before the August 1998 financial crisis catapulted the country back into economic chaos. But Brady addresses these recent changes in a postscript.

Categories: Geography\Russia. Publisher: Yale University Press.

As Moscow bureau chief for Business Week magazine, Rose Brady was on the scene.

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Chapter 16: National Output. Norton, 2006), p. 176. {536} Vance Packard, The Waste Makers (New York: D. McKay, C. 1960), p. 19. {537} Ibid.

The world economy and political system have changed dramatically since the 1987 book was published. The end of the Cold War has unleashed new economic and political forces, and new regionalisms have emerged.

Russia's Struggle to Free Its Economy. A conga line of babushki stood shoulder to shoulder outside the railway station.

The material is well organized in seven chapters that deal, more or less chronologically, with the ups and downs of the reform effort from late 1991 to late 1997; a postscript contains the author's reflections on the August 1998 crisis.

Comments: (2)
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Rose Brady had put together an informative book about what was going on in Russia in the 1990's. Her book goes deeper than the headline news by quoting many Russians ranging from pensioners to oligarchs and by giving specific examples that are illustrative of the larger trends. The writing style is smooth and enjoyable.

The main featured oligarchs are Chubais, Gusinsky, Berezovsky, Chernomyrdin, Khodorkovsky, Luzhkov, Potanin, and Alikperov.

My single criticism is to say that the term "capitalism" should not be applied to what happened in Russia. Capitalism is a system where property rights are protected and therefore people can only get money by earning it. In Russia, the super-rich got their wealth by taking it from the government. Therefore, property rights are not protected and the system is not capitalist.

John Christmas, author of "Democracy Society"
Miromice
This is an fabulous book on how Russia turned from state socialism into a fragile, but market-based economy. Being a Business Week correspondent in Moscow the author could witness all stages of Russia's economic transformation -- starting from supply shortages and chaos of late 1991 to the formation of financial & industrial comglomerates in 1997. This book is an exciting reading because it is easy written and combines stories on both complicated economic issues and on lives of ordinary Russians, struggling to adapt to the changes.