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eBook Pagan's Vows download

by Catherine Jinks

eBook Pagan's Vows download ISBN: 0733610463
Author: Catherine Jinks
Publisher: Hodder Children's Books (1996)
Language: English
ePub: 1597 kb
Fb2: 1647 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: docx txt mobi lrf
Category: Other

notable book CBCA Book of the Year Award for older readers). cation entry: Jinks, Catherine, 1963–. For ages 12 and over.

notable book CBCA Book of the Year Award for older readers). The author would like to thank John O. Ward for his assistance. In writing this book, the author was assisted by a Category B Fellowship from the Literature Board of the Australia Council, the Federal Government’s arts funding and advisory body. First published in 1995. ISBN 978 1 74175 233 5 (pb.

No question about it, Catherine Jinks loves both Pagan and Lord Roland Roucy de Bram, the Knight Templar whom Pagan follows through . Catherine Jinks, Pagan's Vows. Thank you for reading books on BookFrom.

No question about it, Catherine Jinks loves both Pagan and Lord Roland Roucy de Bram, the Knight Templar whom Pagan follows through the siege of Jerusalem, back to France and on into the Abbey of Saint Martin. Her delight in Pagan blazes through every sentence of his slangy, racy, irreverent, witty first person narrative. JENNY PAUSACKER, Viewpoint. A children’s book council of australia notable book.

winner CBCA Book of the Year Award for older readers). Jinks, Catherine, 1963-. winner Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for children’s literature). First published in 1992. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher.

Clement tries to clap his hands, but only manages to produce a weak little noise like the last gasp of a drowning piglet. straighten his fingers properly. What do you think you’re doing, Bernard?’ he exclaims. It’s your turn to arrange the stools. Fetch the Bible, Raymond. Durand, I’ve told you before: if you’re going to wipe your nose, do it on your sleeve, not on your hand. Hands are for touching books. Looks like another private session, for yours truly

Catherine has been writing books since she was eight years old. She doesn’t expect to stop writing them any time soon. Author photo: Catherine Jinks in front of 'Conceptual Networks', by artist Paul du Moulin. Photo by Paul du Moulin. Other books in the series. Pagan Chronicles (4 books). Books by Catherine Jinks

Also, Pagan's sarcastic thoughts are often placed in parentheses within these fragments, further interrupting the flow. Once again, Jinks opens a new world of medieval with her 3rd book in the series, Pagan's Vows

Also, Pagan's sarcastic thoughts are often placed in parentheses within these fragments, further interrupting the flow. The characters sometimes change their behaviors without explanation and some loose ends remain unresolved. Once again, Jinks opens a new world of medieval with her 3rd book in the series, Pagan's Vows. She so nicely inserts knowledge and information of the time period as she continues to engage the reader with an exciting, fast-paced plot line and lovable characters. I felt like I was learning stuff while I read for fun.

As before, Pagan's mix of bad attitude and profound loyalty make a winning combination, and readers will come (or . More Young Adult . More by catherine jinks.

As before, Pagan's mix of bad attitude and profound loyalty make a winning combination, and readers will come (or continue) to care as deeply as he does for his troubled, deeply decent companion. Humor? Rage? Agony? Spiritual journeys? Murder? Moral turpitude? Twists both welcome and dismaying? This decidedly unique historical saga has it all. (Fiction. How to catch a bogle.

Jinks again displays an amazing knack for blending utterly convincing period detail, earthy wisecracking, and profound respect for courtly and spiritual ideals. -BULLETIN OF THE CENTER FOR CHILDREN'S BOOKS Having renounced the sword, Pagan and Lord Roland arrive at the Abbey of St. Martin to devote their lives to God.

Catherine Jinks (born 1963) is an Australian writer of fiction books for all age groups

Catherine Jinks (born 1963) is an Australian writer of fiction books for all age groups. She has won many awards including the Children's Book Council of Australia Book of the Year Award four times, the Victorian Premier's Literary Award, the Aurealis Award for science fiction, the IBBY Australia Ena Noel Encouragement Award, the Adelaide Festival Award, and the Davitt Award for crime fiction.

Comments: (4)
Gaua
Quite brilliant
Vushura
Pagan cannot believe that he is actually agreeing to devote his life to God, to accept life in a monastery. This is a lifestyle that he despises, possibly fears, and also one that he fled from when he was a boy. Though Pagan is often rude, disrespectful, impatient and irreverent, he is also loyal, and it is this loyalty that has made him decide to follow his master, Lord Roland, into a new life in the Abbey of St. Martin. After his experiences in a monastery school as a child, Pagan never dreamed that he would find himself pursuing the life of a monk, but he cannot bear to be separated from his distraught and emotionally lost master.

Thus it is that Pagan has to subject himself to blind obedience, rules that he thinks are ludicrous, and a life full of discomfort and unpleasantness. Needless to say, Pagan is not a good fit for the monastic life and it is a struggle for him to keep his temper, to stay out of trouble, and to try to adjust. Pagan does try his best, for Roland's sake, but all his efforts seem to be for naught when he starts looking into a little mystery that is floating about the Abbey.

Pagan discovers that beneath the veneer of respectability, piety and humility lies a complex tangle made up of lies, deceit and greed. Pagan may not be the most honest person in the world, but this kind of dirty hypocrisy upsets him enough that he will not stop seeking out the truth even when his very life is threatened. It would seem that someone very high up in the monastic hierarchy guides the conspiracy, and Pagan needs to be wary of what he says and does.

One cannot help but have a strong feeling of pity for Pagan. Here is a young man who could never be a monk, but for the love of a friend, he will put himself through a great ordeal --- accepting punishments, bullying, strenuous work, isolation and much more --- all for the sake of someone else. It is shocking to discover how difficult monastic life could be and how appalling the conditions often were. Certainly Pagan's experience puts a new light on the religious life in the times of the Crusades.

Entertaining, moving, skillfully researched, shocking at times, and very gripping, this third book in the Pagan Chronicles series is sure to delight readers who enjoy historical fiction.

--- Reviewed by Marya Jansen-Gruber, editor of Through The Looking Glass Children's Book Review ([...]
Kaghma
(This review is for the paperback version)
"Monks, monk, monks. Monks everywhere, as far as the eye can see. Rows and rows of them, crammed together on their chapter-house seats like bats in a cave. Like crows around a corpse. The rustle of their black woollen sleeves, as they point and nudge and whisper. The coughing and gurgling of old men with clogged lungs."
Lord Roland and his squire Pagan, fresh from battle in the Crusades, have renounced the sword and are seeking to become novice monks at the Abbey of St Martin. Pagan isn't sure he wants to be a monk and soon finds that neither humility nor blind obedience comes easily to him, but he is equally sure he doesn't want to leave his beloved master. He also discovers that even a supposedly holy place can swarm with danger and corruption.
Pagan himself tells the story, writing in the present tense, which usually gives me trouble. I normally find it both stilted an unnatural. However, for this story it feels absolutely right. Although I can imagine that many young readers might take a while to become accustomed to Catherine Jinks's spare, distinctive style, I took to it (and her warm, wry humour) straight away. As can be seen from the above quote (the book's first paragraph) her writing abounds in unfinished sentences, which most writers normally use sparingly. But here the oft-used effect serves to underline Pagan's irreverence, which is my only quibble. While I personally found this trait highly entertaining (indeed, almost endearing) I have difficulty believing that someone raised in a monastery in those days would be quite so irreverent, especially at only 17 years of age. One of his favourite expletives is "Christ in a cream cheese sauce", which would certainly be accounted as blasphemous in those days.
But what does it matter when Jinks provides such an entertaining, "unputdownable" read?
I'm very pleased to learn that the Pagan books are to be republished, though 5 January 2004 (the projected date for the first book, Pagan's Crusade) seems rather a long wait.
Malodred
Once again, Jinks opens a new world of medieval with her 3rd book in the series, Pagan's Vows. She so nicely inserts knowledge and information of the time period as she continues to engage the reader with an exciting, fast-paced plot line and lovable characters. I felt like I was learning stuff while I read for fun.

What I really enjoyed was her vast knowledge of the religion practices of that time. It comes out a lot in this book, but she doesn't make it boring. On the contrary, Jinks manages to make the history pretty interesting and surprisingly relatable, to a point that I felt like I could understand the religious figures of that time.

Most importantly, though, I loved Pagan's character. As always, Pagan's voice is strong, realistic, and wonderfully sarcastic. If you liked the first two books of the series, you'll enjoy this one as well, especially the growing relationship between Pagan and Roland. Even if you haven't read the others, it's still good to read on its own.