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eBook Brother to Brother: The Story of the Latter-day Saint Missionaries who took the Gospel to Black Africa download

by Rendell N. Mabey

eBook Brother to Brother: The Story of the Latter-day Saint Missionaries who took the Gospel to Black Africa download ISBN: 0884945197
Author: Rendell N. Mabey
Publisher: Bookcraft; First Edition edition (1984)
Language: English
Pages: 161
ePub: 1240 kb
Fb2: 1996 kb
Rating: 4.5
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The transition from journal to book was achieved with the aid of Gordon Allred, a professor of English at Weber State College.

Brother to Brother: The Story of the Latter-day Saint Missionaries Who Took the Gospel to Black Africa. In October 1978, two Latter-day Saint couples, Rendell and Rachel Mabey and Edward Q. (Ted) and Janath Cannon, arrived in Lagos, Nigeria, as the first Mormon missionaries assigned to work with that country's black African population. Although the Church had long been active in South Africa, missionary efforts had been restricted to people of European ancestry. The transition from journal to book was achieved with the aid of Gordon Allred, a professor of English at Weber State College.

Brother to brother book. A fascinating story of how the gospel was brought to Africa. Although a short read it is concise and doesn’t stray into less interesting page fillers that a lot of other books tend to do. Well worth the read. Feb 01, 2016 Trent rated it liked it. Shelves: religious. I was impressed to read about the first LDS missionaries to Africa. What a challenge and an amazing experience.

Rendell Noel Mabey (August 8, 1908 – 2000) was a speaker of the Utah House of Representatives, member of the Utah State Senate, and prominent leader of missionaries in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Rendell Noel Mabey (August 8, 1908 – 2000) was a speaker of the Utah House of Representatives, member of the Utah State Senate, and prominent leader of missionaries in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mabey was among the first four LDS missionaries sent to Nigeria, and had previously been president of the Swiss Mission. Rendell N. Mabey was the son of Charles R. Mabey. His father was governor of Utah. Mabey was born in Bountiful Utah

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780884945192. Release Date:January 1984.

In black Africa, where the revelation on the Priesthood was, in effect, the restoration of. .

In black Africa, where the revelation on the Priesthood was, in effect, the restoration of the gospel for them, a loving Heavenly Father raised up many Eliases to help prepare the people. The first missionaries sent to black Africa were Rendell and Rachel Mabey and Ted and Janath Cannon. They arrived in Nigeria just five months after the revelation. On the day Brother Obinna was baptized he was ordained to the Priesthood and set apart as the first black African branch president and Sister Obinna became the first Relief Society president.

Latter-day Saint Missionaries. See actions taken by the people who manage and post content

Latter-day Saint Missionaries. See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Page created – 31 August 2011. The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ. LDS Sister Missionaries.

Saints: The Story of the Church of Jesus Christ in the Latter Days . In 1916 William P. Daniels, a black member of the Church in South Africa, created a study group in his home on Upper Kloof Street in Cape Town. In the study group, members and missionaries from the South African Mission were invited to study the scriptures and other Church literature line upon line. Church leaders in South Africa passed the motion unanimously and assigned an elder to preside over the meeting while Daniels conducted. On December 14, 1931, the meeting became a new branch, which functioned as an auxiliary like the Relief Society and Sunday School.

In October 1978, two Latter-day Saint couples, Rendell and Rachel Mabey .

In October 1978, two Latter-day Saint couples, Rendell and Rachel Mabey and Edward Q. Brother to Brother is based on Rendell Mabey's copious 1,305-page journal, compiled over the period from late 1978 until the fall of 1979, while the Mabeys were serving in Nigeria and neighboring Ghana. The transition from journal to book was achieved with the aid of Gordon Allred, a professor of English at Weber State College

Brother to Brother: The Story of the Latter-day Saints missionaries who took the gosepl to Black Africa. Deseret Book Company.

Brother to Brother: The Story of the Latter-day Saints missionaries who took the gosepl to Black Africa. Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1984. Eleanor Knowles, "Elder James E. Faust: Assistant to the Council of the Twelve", Ensign, January 1973, p. 14. "President James E. Faust dies at 87", Deseret News, 10 August 2007. Pages: James E. Faust. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints titles. Preceded by Thomas S. Monson. Second Counselor in the First Presidency March 12, 1995 – August 10, 2007.

In October 1978, two Latter-day Saint couples, Rendell and Rachel Mabey and Edward Q. (Ted) and Janath Cannon, arrived in Lagos, Nigeria, as the first Mormon missionaries assigned to work with that country's black African population. Although the Church had long been active in South Africa, missionary efforts had been restricted to people of European ancestry. Brother to Brother is based on Rendell Mabey's copious 1,305-page journal, compiled over the period from late 1978 until the fall of 1979, while the Mabeys were serving in Nigeria and neighboring Ghana. The transition from journal to book was achieved with the aid of Gordon Allred, a professor of English at Weber State College.
Comments: (2)
Mikale
It seemed incredible that these people in Nigeria and Ghana were so faithful without having been told the complete way of the true gospel. They were ready and willing to change anything that was needed to follow the Book of Mormon and do things the way that followed the Mormon faith. The missionaries organized those who were so in desire of the gospel, and brought them the restored gospel. These missionaries lived in poor conditions and at an elderly age. The faith they had to have go to this foreign place, at a time of unrest in the country and strive to communicate and teach these people the true gospel, is truly amazing.
Wnex
Rendell Mabey and his wife Rachel were LDS missionaries for one year to Africa in 1978-1979, shortly after the 1978 revelation to LDS President Spencer Kimball which permitted black men of African ancestry to hold the priesthood, and receive Temple ordinances.

Here are some quotations from this 1984 book:

"As you probably know, there are a great many people in Black Africa, especially in Nigeria and Ghana, who have been longing and waiting for a long time to receive the restored gospel." (Pg. 10)
"The whole thing seemed incredible. Did such people actually comprehend what we were offering, or were they merely caught up in the spirit of the group, momentarily captivated by something extraordinary? ... Such misgivings gradually dissipated, however, giving way to the conviction that those people had truly found the only religion they desired." (Pg. 39)
"The moment had come. Brother Anthony Obinna's thirteen years of waiting were over, and the first baptism of our mission had been performed. The doors of the gospel had opened upon the Dark Continent, and the light was pouring forth." (Pg. 47)
"Everywhere ... everywhere ... everywhere! People fairly clamored for the gospel." (Pg. 96)
"'I have been a member of this Church for sixty-two years,' I said, 'and we all know it is true. If that were not so, why would we travel twelve thousand miles and labor from early morning until late each night to bring the people of Nigeria this joyful news?'" (Pg. 105)
"In many ways it seemed regrettable that our black brethren in both countries could not go ahead with baptisms at their own discretion ... I was gradually becoming convinced, for that matter, that the Church was now firmly enough entrenched in West Africa to 'go it alone' in many respects if necessary... On the other hand, the need for an organized mission in those lands was immense, perhaps greater than anywhere else in the world. All that marvelous growth potential needed a methodical cultivation, lest it run wild." (Pg. 158)