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eBook Hard Drive download

by David Pogue

eBook Hard Drive download ISBN: 0441002552
Author: David Pogue
Publisher: Ace (August 1, 1995)
Language: English
ePub: 1447 kb
Fb2: 1636 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf mbr lit rtf
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Thrillers and Suspense

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. When a computer programmer at Artelligence warns his superiors that a simple virus could infect their revolutionary Master Voice program.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

When a computer programmer at Artelligence warns his superiors that a simple virus could infect their revolutionary Master Voice program, no one believes him until it is too late.

David Welch Pogue (born March 9, 1963) is an American technology writer .

David Welch Pogue (born March 9, 1963) is an American technology writer and TV science presenter. He is a personal technology columnist for Yahoo! Tech, a technology correspondent for CBS News Sunday Morning, a columnist for Scientific American, and a technology columnist for The New York Times  .

Hard drive : a novel. by. Pogue, David, 1963-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Computer viruses, Computer crimes, Apple computer. Uploaded by Sanderia on April 15, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. David Pogue's Digital Photography: The Missing Manual.

David Pogue is the creator and primary author of the Missing Manuals (begun since 1999; a joint venture with . He also wrote a technothriller, Hard Drive. Pogue is particularly known for his humour, nearly ubiquitous in his books

David Pogue is the creator and primary author of the Missing Manuals (begun since 1999; a joint venture with O'Reilly & Associates) and leads Pogue Press  . Pogue is particularly known for his humour, nearly ubiquitous in his books. His involvement in the Macintosh user group community can be seen in such events such as User Group University. In July 2002, he presented the Keynote address at UGU New York 2002. David and his wife Jennifer Pogue, MD, live in Connecticut with their three young children.

Used availability for David Pogue's Hard Drive. August 1995 : USA Mass Market Paperback.

Kids will be dying to unearth their own magical powers after reading this whimsical debut by tech personality David Pogue.

Silly magical powers, kids on the run. In a whimsical debut novel from the popular technology writer. One day, Abby Carnelia, ordinary sixth grader, realizes she has a magical power. Okay, it's not a fancy one (she can make a hard-boiled egg spin by tugging on her ears). But it's the only one she has, and it's enough to launch her into an adventure where she meets a host of kids with similarly silly powers, becomes a potential guinea pig for a drug company, and hatches a daring plan for escape

When a computer programmer at Artelligence warns his superiors that a simple virus could infect their revolutionary Master Voice program, no one believes him until it is too late
Comments: (7)
Umdwyn
Fun read for kids of the 80's. i bought the hard copy for nostalgic reasons. i loved the book, but it's not for everyone.
Kata
Probably one of the best early 1990s computer dramas in written form. A definite Mac focus and maybe some iffy character behavior, but overall a good experience.
Otrytrerl
On a whim, I picked this book up at a used bookstore. The cover art alone screamed that this was a period piece set in the early days of the computer renaissance. The book's spelling of "internet" as "InterNet", as it talks about this mysterious and hallowed technology possessed only by the military and universities, is quaint. It reminds me of the first order I ever placed on Amazon.com in the late '90s, when I sent in a paper check because I didn't want to send my credit card number over the "InterNet."

The plot is decent, and is worthwhile alone for its depiction of the dysfunctional organizational behavior of the fictional Silicon Valley startup of that era. The tension seems a bit hyperbolic, and strikes of the early computer era when "viruses" were a new concept. It is also a bit odd to read this book from before Windows 95 and realize that it must have seemed much more believable at the time that any serious piece of corporate or military software would be written for a Mac.

The review stating that this is "historical fiction" could not be more apt. Enjoy it for what it is - if you lived through this time, there's probably a little bit of nostalgic magic in it.
Drelajurus
A 2001 reviewer complained about the gratuitous sex in the first and last chapters. After I wrote an initial review of my own saying there was no sex at all in this novel, he has now (Dec. 2004) revised his review to say that the copy of the book that he obtained from his public library evidently was a publisher's error -- it did indeed have two chapters with sex between characters that didn't appear at all in the rest of the book. Very strange, but errors do occur in publishing. So this review is my revised version. In any case, this is a novel about computer nerds -- driven, vicious, dangerous, yes -- trying to destroy each other in a quest to get a ground-breaking new killer-app program to market. It's exciting in a goofy sort of way -- you always want to know what is going to happen to next, and the villains are *really* villainous, and right up to the very end it looks as if the bad guys are gonna get away with their nefarious scheme. The characters are cardboard, but, for all I know, typical of geekdom in Silicon Valley. Read it, and get several hours of enjoyment from it.

BUT -- don't expect there to be any sex in it except for a chaste kiss in the next-to-the-last line. What else could you expect from computer types?
Shakanos
New, top quality science-based fiction is getting scarce. It is refreshing to read a story that could really be happening. The premis was excellent as well as scarey for those of us who rely on PCs and the internet. It was easy to imagine myself in the story, not merely observing. Characters were a little two dimensional and innocent (or guilty) but that was a minor deterant from the overall enjoyment of the book. If there is any real criticism it is the fact that by time I read the book some of the technology was obsolete (although speech recognition is still in its infancy.) All-in-all a very enjoyable read and I pray Mr. Pogue will write more in the same vein.
Уou ll never walk alone
I bought this book on impulse while standing in line at my college bookstore. It was a slow day and I needed something resembling mental popcorn to occupy my brain for awhile.
Hard Drive turned out to be one of the best computer-themed thrillers I've ever read. I devoured the book in a few hours and read it again immediately thereafter. (I NEVER re-read anything.)
I'm not a Macintosh fan, but I appreciate that David Pogue is definitely a Mac expert. I didn't see anything wrong with his using the book to toot the Mac's horn a little bit. Those without much knowledge of computers might be a little put off by the book's premise, but I don't think the book would appeal to that type of person anyway.
This book is out-of-print, but is well worth searching out!
Alsantrius
Look for people who really understand computers and can helpother people understand them, and you get a small pool of people.
Look for people who really understand people and can make them come alive for others, and you have a smaller pool of people.
Look for people who understand stories and can make them captivate audiences, and you have a yet smaller pool.
Look for people who combine the three, and you get David Pogue and his novel Hard Drive.
I found the concept interesting, but the characters totally uninteresting. The bad guys were unbelievably bad, invoking no sympathy, empathy, or understanding from the reader. The other characters were mostly bores.
The plot almost makes up for the loss in the characters. I guess I liked the book - I guess. Not even remotely close to being a "10" - try "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" by Robert Heinlein instead (a definite 10).