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eBook The Danger download

by Dick Francis

eBook The Danger download ISBN: 0449202631
Author: Dick Francis
Publisher: Fawcett (February 12, 1985)
Language: English
ePub: 1286 kb
Fb2: 1765 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf txt docx lrf
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Thrillers and Suspense

Dick Francis stands head and shoulders above the rest. Fiction by Dick Francis & Felix Francis. A Berkley Book, published by arrangement with Dick Francis Corporation.

Dick Francis stands head and shoulders above the rest.

THE DANGER - VG+ Francis, Dick - 22nd book. Andrew Douglas works for a company specializing in returning kidnap victims to their families. Italy's foremost woman jockey is kidnapped, then a racehorse owner's son and finally the Senior Steward of the Jockey Club. The hero himself is a kidnap negotiations expert, brought in to help with the return of Alessia Cenci, Europe's hottest female flat jockey.

In particular, Dick Francis does a tremendous job of portraying the emotional damage a victim of abduction suffers and the subsequent symptoms of posttraumatic stress

Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). In particular, Dick Francis does a tremendous job of portraying the emotional damage a victim of abduction suffers and the subsequent symptoms of posttraumatic stress. This is not a particularly horsy book, but rather a thriller that feels totally real - and a love story of ineffable charm. I recommended it wholeheartedly.

Dick Francis The Danger Kidnapping is a fact of life. Always has been, always will be. Extorting a ransom is an age-old pastime, less risky and more lucrative than robbing banks. Kidnapping, twentieth-century style, has meant train loads and 'plane loads of hostages, athletes killed in company at Munich, men of substance dying lonely deaths. All kidnappers are unstable, but the political variety, hungry for power and publicity as much as.

Электронная книга "The Danger", Dick Francis. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Danger" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. When a string of kidnappings rocks the horse racing world, Andrew Douglas is brought in to recover the missing-without becoming the next victim. Другие книги автора Dick Francis.

During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List of 2000.

Richard Stanley Francis CBE FRSL (31 October 1920 – 14 February 2010) was a British crime writer, and former steeplechase jockey, whose novels centre on horse racing in England. After wartime service in the RAF, Francis became a full-time jump-jockey, winning over 350 races and becoming champion jockey of the British National Hunt.

Like all of Francis books, the title includes multiple implications. The Danger’ seems to embrace not just risk of victims dying, but also - victims mental breakdown, family destruction, financial bankruptcy, police guilt from incompetence, etc. et. .This work directed to psychological, philosophical drama more than physical conflict.

The Danger Dick Francis. This book, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from the pubhsher. Printed in the united states of america. KIDNAPPING is a fact of life.

The Danger by Dick Francis. Andrew Douglas finds kidnap victims. When a golden-girl jockey, Alessia Cenci, disappears, followed b the young child of a derby winner, problems only get worse when the senior steward of the Jockey Club disappears. Suddenly, Andrew's caseload is overflowing, and he's investigating from Italy to England and Washington, D.C.! He must work hard to not be on the next list of kidnap victims! Enjoy this thriller.
Comments: (7)
Kupidon
“‘I can’t bear to sell the house on Mikonos . . . my wife loved it.”
“She loved Alessia too. She’d think it a fair swap.”

(Victims father expressing the pain of losing his vacation house because of the ransom. Douglass’ reasoning seems so. . .so. . .cold.)

He looked at me for a while.
“You’re a strange young man,” he said.
“You make things so clear.”
He paused. “Don’t you ever get muddled by emotion?”
“Yes, sometimes,” I said.

This contrast - cold logic vs hot emotion - provides the foundation to construct the drama. Douglass, the central character, organizes, counsels, directs, fixes with clear, sympathetic ‘Reason’.

The villain, his intellectual equal; the victims, broken and suffering; two types of police, wise and successful, or foolish and destructive; are drawn vividly, colorfully and quickly. Francis uses each character to present interplay of disciplined control and uncontrolled feeling.

Great!

“But when it happens . . . I try to sort myself out. To see some logic.”
“And once you see some logic, you act on it?”
“Try to.”
I paused. “Yes.”
“It sounds . . . cold.”
I shook my head.
“Logic doesn’t stop you feeling. You can behave logically, and it can hurt like hell. Or it can comfort you. Or release you. Or all at the same time.”
After a while he said, stating a fact, “Most people don’t behave logically.”
“No,” I said.
“You seem to think everyone could, if they wanted to?”
I shook my head. “No.”
He waited, so I went on diffidently,
“There’s genetic memory against it, for one thing. And to be logical you have to dig up and face your own hidden motives and emotions, and of course they’re hidden principally because you don’t want to face them. So . . . um . . . it’s easier to let your basement feelings run the upper stories, so to speak, and the result is rage, quarrels, love, jobs, opinions, anorexia, philanthropy . . . almost anything you can think of. I just like to know what’s going on down there, to pick out why I truly want to do things, that’s all. Then I can do them or not. Whichever.”

(This conversation presents the verbal, intellectual, theoretical idea that Francis uses as underlying theme.)

He looked at me consideringly. “Self-analysis . . . did you study it?”
“No. Lived it. Like everyone does.”
He smiled faintly. “At what age?”
“Well . . . from the beginning. I mean, I can’t remember not doing it. Digging into my own true motives. Knowing in one’s heart of hearts. Facing the shameful things . . . the discreditable impulses . . . Awful, really.”
He picked up his glass and drank some brandy.
“Did it result in sainthood?” he said, smiling.
“Er . . . no. In sin, of course, from doing what I knew I shouldn’t.”

The psychological impact (on victim, family and villain) of kidnapping covered in detail. I found this fascinating!

For example . . .

“His fury bubbled on, and I couldn’t blame him. It often seemed to those who loved that literally no price was too great to pay for the safe return of the loved one, but I’d learned a great deal about the unexpected faces of stress over the past four years, and I’d seen that for the future health of the family’s relationships it was essential that one member had not in fact cost the rest everything.’’

Why?

“After the first euphoria, and when the financial loss had begun to bite, the burden of guilt on the paid-for victim became too great, and the resentment of the payers too intense, and they too began to feel guilt for their resentment, and could eventually hate the victim for love of whom they had beggared themselves. To save the victims’ future equilibrium had gradually become to me as important as their actual physical freedom, but it was an aim I didn’t expect Paolo Cenci at that moment to appreciate.’’

Long range thinking.

Another psychological insight of father whose infant son kidnapped . . .

“ ‘John Nerrity,” I said neutrally, “is like one of those snowstorm paperweights, all shaken up, with bits of guilt and fear and relief and meanness all floating around in a turmoil. It takes a while after something as traumatic as the last few days for everything in someone’s character to settle, like the snowstorm, so to speak, and for all the old pattern to reassert.”
“I’d never thought of it like that.’”

Like all of Francis books, the title includes multiple implications . . .

‘The Danger’ seems to embrace not just risk of victims dying, but also - victims mental breakdown, family destruction, financial bankruptcy, police guilt from incompetence, etc. etc..

This work directed to psychological, philosophical drama more than physical conflict.

Nevertheless - the story, the people, the reading - is fast, captivating and interesting.

Francis does it again!
ZEr0
Having read this book a number of years ago, I wondered if I would enjoy having it on my Kindle. Buying the book was so easy, so quick, I began reading immediately. I found the book as entertaining, suspenseful, and as informative on the unthinkable challenges faced by a kidnap victim as I had the first time I read it. I hadn't remembered all the details and the action is rapid, so I wasn't at all bored. As Francis takes his hero, Andrew Douglas, into three countries, the characters of the criminal and Douglas slowly unfold along with some techniques used to negotiate a safe release of a kidnap victim. This is a hard book to put down from its beginning in Italy to the ending in Washington, D.C. A young lady has been captive for over 5 weeks, and the attempt to ransom her was bungled by a glory-seeking officer. Douglas is faced with convincing the criminal, the family, and the police to renegotiate, from the beginning. In the process he learns valuable information, that aids him in rescues in England and the United States. One kidnapping master mind, three different cultures, three different attitudes toward the process of liberating a captive, but the endeavor is successful until Douglas himself is kidnapped. He knows he will never be ransomed: His captor wants revenge. This is Dick Francis at his best, holding the reader in suspense from the first paragraph to the last word. Anyone who enjoys a good mystery will enjoy this book!
Jogrnd
This is Dick Francis at his best. The hero, Andrew Douglas, is a partner in a company that advises families and companies in cases of kidnapping.

Andrew understands the psychology of both kidnappers and victims. He gets involved in ransom negotiations, recovery of the victim and helping the rescued victim reintegrate into ordinary everyday life.

When we meet Andrew, he's working in Italy (his highly specialized profession takes him all over the world). Alessia Cenci, world-class champion girl jockey, has just been kidnapped. The daughter of a rich, devoted father, Alessia is young, beautiful and brilliant. (If you sense the potential for romance here, you are correct!)

There are lots of things to love about this book. The hero is low-key, thoughtful, cool headed in a crisis and wonderfully compassionate - a rock with a soft heart. The methodology of dealing successfully with kidnappers is fascinating, and we see this unfold on more than one case. All the supporting characters are well drawn. And the plot has a symmetry about it that's truly elegant.

In particular, Dick Francis does a tremendous job of portraying the emotional damage a victim of abduction suffers and the subsequent symptoms of posttraumatic stress.

This is not a particularly horsy book, but rather a thriller that feels totally real - and a love story of ineffable charm. I recommended it wholeheartedly.
Marilbine
I have read many Dick Francis' books. This one was not on my favorite list. It had some interesting twists but I just didn't get the same 'kick' out of the story that I usually do with his books.
Nenayally
I've read many of these Dick Francis books and this one hovers on the fringe of racing and is an interesting story, the hero isn't into horse racing but helping kidnap victims and negotiation for their release. He helps free a young lady jockey in Italy and then tracks her kidnaper in England and the United States. A bit of romance and the high moral character of the lead make for a good story. Glad I purchased it. These books help me feel connected in a way with my English roots.
Alsardin
There is nothing better than a Dick Francis novel........I have read over 20 of them and keep getting more. His research is well done.
Chuynopana
Characters who draw you in and a plot that hurdles toward the finish. Dick Francis weaves another well written, twisty tale.