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by Scott Turow

eBook The Laws of Our Fathers (Windsor Selections) download ISBN: 0745154212
Author: Scott Turow
Publisher: Chivers Large print (Chivers, Windsor, Paragon & C; Large Print Ed edition (March 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 933
ePub: 1208 kb
Fb2: 1324 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf rtf docx mobi
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Thrillers and Suspense

Home Scott Turow The Laws of Our Fathers. Which leaves us with the awful doomed inquiry of our middle years, the harpy's voice that whispers in dreams, at sunrise, at those unforeseen instants of drilling isolation: Is this as happy as I will ever be? Do I have the right to just a little more?

Home Scott Turow The Laws of Our Fathers. The laws of our fathers, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63. 64. The laws of our fathers. Which leaves us with the awful doomed inquiry of our middle years, the harpy's voice that whispers in dreams, at sunrise, at those unforeseen instants of drilling isolation: Is this as happy as I will ever be? Do I have the right to just a little more? Or is there nothing better I should hope for?

The Laws of Our Fathers, published in 1996, is Scott Turow's fourth and longest novel, at 832 pages

The Laws of Our Fathers, published in 1996, is Scott Turow's fourth and longest novel, at 832 pages. When last seen in Turow's The Burden of Proof, Sonia Klonsky was a prosecutor with the U. S. Attorney's office in Kindle County with a failing marriage, an infant daughter, and a single mastectomy. She becomes one of the narrators here.

he Laws of Our Fathers is different than Turow's previous novels. It is a story about our legal system, but it is more of an exploration of the sixties and events that sculpted a generation

he Laws of Our Fathers is different than Turow's previous novels. It is a story about our legal system, but it is more of an exploration of the sixties and events that sculpted a generation. Sonia Klonsky, whom we met in The Burden of Proof, is a newcomer to the Superior Court bench.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A drive-by shooting of an aging white woman at a gang-plagued Kindle County housing project sets in motion Scott Turow's intensely absorbing novel. With its riveting suspense and idelibly drawn characters. The Laws of Our Fathers has been added to your Cart.

Pleading Guilty (1993). The Burden of Proof (1990). Presumed Innocent (1987). For Rachel, Gabriel, and Eve. Contents.

The Laws of the Fathers, by Scott Turow (read 7 Aug 2019) This is the sixth book I've read by this author. I was so tremendously impressed and caught up by his book, One L, about his first year. Scott Turow is the author of worldwide bestselling novels including Presumed Innocent, Innocent, Ordinary Heroes, The Burden of Proof, Reversible Errors and Limitations.

Unlike some of his fellow ists, Turow takes his time with his books: one every three years since Presumed Innocent. This time it has been spectacularly worth the wait. Laws of Our - Publishers Weekly. Пользовательский отзыв - AliceAnna - LibraryThing. A good, if not great, book. A nice look at the class.

THOSE OF US BORN IN THE YEARS OF BOUNTY AFTER WORLD War II knew we had a different outlook than earlier generations of Americans. But we took seriously the promise of the Declaration of Independence that the birthright of America was not merely life or liberty, but the pursuit of happiness. Personally, as a child, I always assumed that was the point of growing up. So I'd feel better than I did then.

The Laws of our Fathers.

Comments: (7)
komandante
Since I loved his earlier books, I was very disappointed by the excruciatingly slow pace of this one. Despite having grown up in the late 1960s myself, I found many if the flashbacks quite boring and not that credible. I felt like I was forcing myself to finish the book and eventually gave up because I didn't really care what happened to the characters. While the writing itself was good, and quite descriptive, I didn't feel much depth to the characters, it felt like reading a book about your neighbors by someone who didn't know them very well. I don't plan to read anything else in this series and feel the book would have been greatly improved by trimming, tightening and amping up the narrative arc.
Dyni
Is this an abnormal psychology text? The plot is so convoluted and difficult to follow that I found myself having to refer back to find out the timeframe or who us talking. I suppose it is an attempt to give context to the characters but for me it was laborious. Frankly, knowing why the players were so conflicted and tormented by their lives and felt so frustrated and angry doesn't add that much to the story. And the whole last 1/3 of the book is a character analysis after the plot has played out. I kept reading thinking there might be one final twist. But no. A general disappointment as a mystery but at times an interesting character study.
Thordibandis
Technically, Scott Turow is a very good writer. In this story he's done a fine job of describing what it's like for hippies to grow up -- at least for those who do grow up. Unfortunately, as seems to be the usual case, he's vastly overwritten his story, and in the end the whole thing comes apart, falling into pieces like a musical theme unresolved. It's too bad. The poor man badly needs a capable editor who can help him get under control his tendency to overwrite.
Winawel
After reading some of the reviews and the criticisms, I have to disagree with those that found the last 100 pages unnecessary or boring. Yes, it is a complex courtroom dramtic story with very complicated characters. Typical of Turow, each of the main characters are explored in depth as to their make up and what contributed to whom they have become. The flashbacks to the sixties were wonderful for me having lived through that time and, seeing who they became 25 years later was very realistic. But it was the psychological insight, honesty and development of these people in the last 60 or so pages that blew me away. I had to struggle to read some of the passages through my tears. At times, I felt like my heart was being ripped out by what he was saying. As always, he is a master in dealing with all these levels of story telling which puts him more than head and shoulders above the other legal thriller writers.
Narim
Turow is a great writer who can really develop characters, but if you are looking for a legal thriller, forget this one. It's really the life story of a female judge who is presiding over a trial with lengthy flashbacks to develop each of the characters, who happen to be from her past. The actual trial is interesting, but it's probably only about 15-20% of the book. I was thinking about giving this book only two stars, because I really didn't care about most of what was written about the characters, but that could just be me.
skriper
I think that the book was longer than it needed to be. The story was interesting and i thoroughly enjoyed it but I found myself wondering how much longer it would take to tell it. He has a gift for dialog as is illustrated by the coversation's between the protagonist and his best friend and his coversations with his lover's daughter. His descriptions could be overly long and at times confusing enough that I had to reread some of them multiple times. I would reccommend this book because the issues it raises are important and thoughtfully presented.
Vathennece
I normally enjoy Turow's books, including the Kindle County book. This is a large departure from his previous formats and one that I did not find to be enjoyable - in fact, it was actually difficult to read. I almost put it down after a couple of chapters. It improved, but the ending was as bad as the first couple of chapters.

Very disappointed.
The story moves at a very slow pace and drags out way too long. It is told partially through flashbacks and a lot of the dialogue could have been shortened to make the story move faster. There is also a lot of unnecessary foul language in this book which is also very distracting. Not one of Scott Turow's best efforts.