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eBook Ah, Treachery! download

by Ross Thomas

eBook Ah, Treachery! download ISBN: 0446400319
Author: Ross Thomas
Publisher: Grand Central Pub (November 1, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 264
ePub: 1789 kb
Fb2: 1648 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf lrf lit lrf
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Thrillers and Suspense

ah, treachery! also by Ross Thomas The Cold War Swap The Seersucker Whipsaw Cast a Yellow Shadow The . An imprint of St. Martin's Press.

ah, treachery! also by Ross Thomas The Cold War Swap The Seersucker Whipsaw Cast a Yellow Shadow The Singapore Wink The Fools in Town Are on Our Side The Backup Me. Printed in the United States of America. For information, address St. Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, .

The late Ross Thomas wrote some of America's most fondly remembered novels about politics, espionage, and crime, creating some of the most colorful characters in the genre

Ah, Treachery!, the last novel Thomas wrote before his death, tells. The late Ross Thomas wrote some of America's most fondly remembered novels about politics, espionage, and crime, creating some of the most colorful characters in the genre. One measure of the esteem in which Thomas was held by his peers in the Mystery Writers of America were the awards they granted him for his writing, including a posthumous lifetime award.

And we’ve also got us Senora Trigueros, age twenty-six, who’s just as dead. No passports and not much in the way of ID except for some of his old Army papers and her civilian stuff that gives an address in San Salvador. Where’d it happen? Patrokis said. Over on Mintwood Place just off Columbia Road. What’s it look like? A pro hit.

Ross Thomas left us with twenty novels- each uniquely entertaining and original- a rare commodity these days. Ah, Treachery! is perhaps one of his best.

Next in our continuing reprint of the late Ross Thomas's work. Ross Thomas left us with twenty novels- each uniquely entertaining and original- a rare commodity these days. But then, I suppose that's like saying this well polished gem shines better than the others in the proverbial light. Then again, maybe it's just a matter of perspective.

Ross Thomas (February 19, 1926 in Oklahoma City – December 18, 1995 in Santa Monica, California) was an American writer of crime fiction. He is best known for his witty thrillers that expose the mechanisms of professional politics. He also wrote several novels under the pseudonym Oliver Bleeck about professional go-between Philip St. Ives.

Ah, Treachery!, the last novel Thomas wrote before his death, tells the story of one Captain Edd "Twodees" Partain, drummed out of the Army and hounded by r. .Ah, Treachery! Ross Thomas; Introduction by Joe Gores. St. Martin's Publishing Group.

Ross Thomas took the talent and time to turn out truly good and entertaining books, this one in particular. Incidentally, Thomas only explains the title, Briarpatch, close to the end of the book. Is BRIARPATCH a great book? Well, that's subjective because what's great to some, sucks for others. All I know is that when I get tired of the popular mystery or thriller writers of the day-this day- I go back and find a John D. MacDonald or Ross Thomas to enjoy reading again.

Ah, Treachery!, the last novel Thomas wrote before his death, tells the story of one Captain Edd "Twodees" . Ross Thomas is that rare phenomenon, a writer of suspense whose novels can be read with pleasure more than once.

Ah, Treachery!, the last novel Thomas wrote before his death, tells the story of one Captain Edd "Twodees" Partain, drummed out of the Army and hounded by rumors of his involvement in a secret operation in El Salvador. Twodees gets hired on to help a fundraiser for the "Little Rock folks" recover funds that were stolen from an illicit stash used to smooth over problems and pay off hush money.

Ah, treachery! by. Ross Thomas. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 19, 2014.

When his rainmaker associate discovers that $1.2 million has been stolen from her war chest, gun shop clerk Edd "Twodees" Partain is forced to return to his former life of spies, revolutionaries, and murderers. Reprint.
Comments: (7)
Swift Summer
The late Ross Thomas wrote some of America's most fondly remembered novels about politics, espionage, and crime, creating some of the most colorful characters in the genre. One measure of the esteem in which Thomas was held by his peers in the Mystery Writers of America were the awards they granted him for his writing, including a posthumous lifetime award. Another is that each of the books in the reprint editions brought out under the Minotaur Books imprint of St. Martin's Press early in the 21st century includes an introduction by one of today's best-known authors of suspense fiction.

Joe Gores introduced the 2007 reprint of Thomas' twenty-fifth and final novel, Ah, Treachery! His introduction is typical. Like every one of the others, there are several hilarious anecdotes about Thomas, clearly establishing him as a man who defied categorization. For example, Gore describes an exchange between Thomas and the screenwriter for a film based on one of his books set in Africa. The screenwriter "remarked that the locale wasn't coming through enough in the script. 'Then let's set it in Omaha,' said Ross. He was serious." Gores also quotes Thomas from a dinnertime conversation with him: "'I'm not a cynic . . . I'm a spoiled romantic.'" And the description fits many of the protagonists in Thomas' novels.

Many mystery and suspense authors construct elaborate plots that create suspense and offer multiple surprises on the way to a shattering conclusion. Thomas' plots may be a little more diabolical and surprising than most. But what is most distinctive about a Ross Thomas novel are the endlessly colorful characters he creates. In Ah, Treachery! the protagonist is a cashiered Army major who was involved in the "secret" U.S. effort to support Salvadoran death squads in the 1980s. He is hired as a bodyguard by a woman who was a rainmaker for the Democratic Party in the 1992 Presidential election and is now feigning fatal illness by hiding out in a luxurious hospital suite to escape being named Ambassador to Togo. There are two other women, one the rainmaker's daughter, and both step right out of real life onto the page. Two generals, a colonel, an assassin-for-hire, and a Greek-American CIA officer who rides a motorcycle and wears an earring, an eyepatch, and a red bandanna around his head are among the other characters who round out the cast.

Gores obviously loves Ah, Treachery! He concludes his introduction, "[L]ike most of Ross's novels, after all the twists and turns and betrayals and murders and blood and assaults, it has a totally satisfying ending. Even a happy ending of sort, in a Ross Thomas sort of way. Nobody ever wrote 'em like Ross Thomas, and to me Ah, Treachery! is Ross at his very best." I agree. And so did Kirkus Reviews: "The title, a sly translation of Beethoven's aria, perfectly captures the disapproving, exhilarated tone of this effervescent concoction . . . [A]ll the characters project such a deliciously matter-of-fact sense of knowing exactly what they're talking about, from campaign finance reform to assassination techniques, that just meeting, listening to, and watching them in action will leave you dizzy with pleasure." Publishers Weekly favored it as well, calling it a "sprightly new suspense thriller" upon its publication. Sadly, this was the final Ross Thomas novel.

What Gore doesn't mention but comes out in the introductions to other Ross Thomas novels is that Thomas may have been a spook for a time, as are several of the characters in his books. And when he writes about electoral politics, he clearly knows what he's doing as well. I was never a spook, but politics is a field I know well.
Malodora
The late Ross Thomas, in his last novel (and not his best), shows his genius in character description, which he paints with light and fast strokes of his literary brush. For the old political junkie, as he defined himself in an early interview, It’s just business as usual, another great Ross Thomas thriller. Many of his works begin in a fairly abstract place, none more so than Ah, Treachery! The reader just needs to hang on and keep reading for a chapter or two, it will all make sense soon enough.
Raymond Chandler said, “When in doubt, have a man come through the door with a gun in his hand.” Thomas uses treachery like Chandler uses guns, and through overuse undercuts the dramatic power of his stories. This kind of failing is hardly unique, or even problematic for general success. There's no sign that Chandler's prestige is on a downslide, and "upping the ante by delivering another unnecessary twist" is everywhere in contemporary popular thrillers.

Since Chandler is so famous, you can find criticism of his work. I haven't found much criticism of Thomas; people say that he is great and underrated and leave it at that. Probably his place in 20-century literature is reasonably secure but it would be nice to get him a little more respect. It doesn't matter that Thomas doesn't always provide a satisfying dénouement. He provides voice, subtle perception, history, and a passionate but cynical love of politics unrivaled by any other author in the genre.

Ah, Treachery! references the incoming Clinton administration with characteristic dry acceptance. Just after publication, Thomas died from lung cancer, not yet 70 years old.
Nikok
Ross Thomas is a new addiction of mine. I stumbled upon "Briarpatch" in a translated version (my first language is Portuguese) and eagerly finished it in no time. This being the only title available in Brazil, I set out to buying Kindle editions (most of them are available for Kindle) and "Ah, Treachery" was the first I got.

It has the same vibe from "Briarpatch", a fast-paced story with lots of actions. I like the plot, I like the characters and all in all reading it is a good, fun experience.

However, the Kindle edition lacks professional proof-reading. A lot of words are merged together, no spaces between them. A lot of dialogue lines end up on the same paragraph, making it harder to tell who is saying what.

I would probably not bother about them or mention them, were they not so frequent. Also, I think that the price is high for such a poorly proofed book. At $9.99, I would expect a lot more care from the publishers, specially because Thomas seems to be well regarded by the lovers of the genre.

One of the reviews mentions that this seems to be an issue with most of the Kindle editions, which bothers me a bit, as I intend to purchase them and the Kindle edition is convenient.
Kage
First, let me note that my Kindle book had numerous run-on lines (multiple lines with no spaces between any of the words, making the text almost unintelligible) and incorrect paragraph breaks. Whoever formatted the book for Kindle did an awful job.

In general, I found the book slick, a bit too slick. Many killings, and the reader can usually guess when one is about to happen. The vile military corruption never becomes a real theme of the book, either -- one does not know if the author suggests that it is rampant or unusual. As the father of a Marine officer I found the portrayal of the military (chewing up the good guys and making thieves or murderers out of the others) to be troubling. The book is an escape, one without any kind of deep meaning, and one that leaves the reader with no very good idea of what makes the hero tick.