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eBook Mood Indigo download

by Charlotte Vale Allen

eBook Mood Indigo download ISBN: 0965743713
Author: Charlotte Vale Allen
Publisher: Island Nation Pr Llc; 1st edition (April 1, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 284
ePub: 1371 kb
Fb2: 1559 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mbr lit azw mobi
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

Mood Indigo brilliantly catches the mood of depression era Manhattan inside a smooth, well-executed mystery. Acclaimed and best-selling mystery writer Charlotte Vale-Allen began her career in her native Canada.

Mood Indigo brilliantly catches the mood of depression era Manhattan inside a smooth, well-executed mystery. The who-done-it is fun and Honoria lives up to her name as an honorable and interesting character. The support cast adds a veritable feel for the era even as they propel the tale forward. She now lives in Norwalk, where she publishes her novels under the aegis of her own publishing company, Island Nation Press. Her latest mystery Mood Indigo, comes with a quote from Colin Dexter, author of the Inspector Morse series and an admirer of Allen.

It is late winter 1934 in Manhattan when DeeDee Carlson dies after falling from the balcony of her apartment at the Ansonia. Honoria Barlow reluctantly agrees to investigate the death of her friend DeeDee Carlson, at the request of DeeDee's boyfriend Chip, and she discovers that her friend had many dangerous secrets.

Charlotte Vale-Allen was born in Toronto and lived in England from 1961 to 1964 where she worked as a television actress and singer

Charlotte Vale-Allen was born in Toronto and lived in England from 1961 to 1964 where she worked as a television actress and singer. She returned to Toronto briefly, performing as a singer and in cabaret revues until she emigrated to the United States in 1966. Shortly after her marriage to Walter Allen in 1970 she began writing and sold her first novel Love Life in 1974.

Mood indigo : a novel. by. Allen, Charlotte Vale, 1941-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on July 26, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Charlotte Vale Allen has written many books, all different, and Mood Indigo is no exception. I have always teased my vanity with the thought I would write a book one day. I am a librarian and all of us are wannabee authors I think. She makes you care about the characters. Mood Indigo is a must read for mystery buffs. Were I an author I would like to be one like Charlotte Valle Allen. Mood Indigo is set in 1934 and that is more than a date. The fashions, the newspaper articles, the slang and the behavior of the character ring true and clear.

Charlotte Vale-Allen (born January 19, 1941) is a writer of contemporary fiction. She lived in the United Kingdom from 1961 to 1964 working as a singer and actress. She emigrated to the United States in 1966 following a brief return to Canada. After marrying Walter Bateman Allen Jr. in 1970, she moved to Connecticut where she has lived since

Used availability for Charlotte Vale Allen's Mood Indigo.

Used availability for Charlotte Vale Allen's Mood Indigo.

At the urging of guileless Chip Stevenson, the son of Honoria's deceased best friend, the women try to uncover the secrets behind the murder/suicide of hing Dee Dee Carlson, Chip's fortune-seeking girlfriend. Curiously, the mystery-solving endeavors of Honoria and Maybelle take a backseat to the interaction between Honoria's comrades and housemates and Allen's vivid portrait of Depression-era America.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Charlotte Vale Allen books online. Matters of the Heart. Charlotte Vale Allen. Charlotte Vale-Allen. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

Honoria Barlow reluctantly agrees to investigate the death of her friend DeeDee Carlson, at the request of DeeDee's boyfriend Chip, and she discovers that her friend had many dangerous secrets
Comments: (7)
lolike
This is what happens when you have an out of control TBR pile of books. This buried treasure got caught up in a divorce, a move, and the chaos of starting over before I found it again. What a writer! This is my first experience with this author, and finding the words to describe what she does with words ... puts me to shame. I had no trouble keeping track of the characters and their back stories, which is often a problem for me in other books. She is articulate and insightful and even though I *thought* I knew where she was going with her story I was wrong, and I was not disappointed. Her pacing and rhythm had me turning page after page and I got emotional and even weepy. That doesn't happen for me often either. She's smart, she knows what she's talking about and I so appreciate that. The woman has written and published 34 books according to the jacket on this one ... and it's out of stock! What does that tell you? I will definitely be reading more of her work ... and I'm sorry it took me so long to get to this one.
Vudozilkree
I think the part of this book that hooked me was Honoria's energy towards everybody around her. In a time when many people still looked at black people and assumed they were nothing more than hired help, Honoria hired May as her personal assistant and treated her as an equal from day one. When the son of Honoria's best friend comes to her for help (wanting to prove that his fiancee was murdered, and didn't commit suicide) she reluctantly agrees to ask around and see what she can find. Toss in her loyal housekeeper, Mick (her Russian lover who everybody thinks is her husband), and a smattering of other characters and you've got a great story. Aside from the actual story, I liked the fact that the author kept the number of characters minimal so that you didn't have any trouble following who was whom.
Uriel
Mood Indigo is my favorite book. The writing is excellent.
Mood Indigo is brilliant; it kept me guessing "who did it" until the end. Usually in mystery books I can tell right off the bat who the killer is. But not this time. And usually I can say at least one thing I didn't like about a book. But not this time.
I highly recommend Mood Indigo to anyone who wants to read a mystery with exceptional characters in a time before the internet and cell phones. I guarantee you will not be disappointment.
Charlotte Vale Allen has written many books, all different, and Mood Indigo is no exception. She makes you care about the characters.
Mood Indigo is a must read for mystery buffs. Once you've read the book you will see why it's my all-time favorite book.
Terr
I have always teased my vanity with the thought I would write a book one day. I am a librarian and all of us are wannabee authors I think. Were I an author I would like to be one like Charlotte Valle Allen.

Mood Indigo is set in 1934 and that is more than a date. The fashions, the newspaper articles, the slang and the behavior of the character ring true and clear. The book is 1934 rather than being set there.

The action is swift. There are no long passages of explanation, no artificial leaps into the past or future, and the dialog and vocabulary are effortless to comprehend. The characterization is deep and handled without spending much time diverting us from the plot.

The book reads like its a movie without a screen, no other quick way to explain it. I highly recommend it.
Vareyma
Wonderful as always, Charlotte develops and then allows us to explore vivid and complex characters. She weaves an amazing tapestry of a book, starting with only a few colors then leading us on with the promise of more and brilliant additions, and she does not disappoint.
The pace of this book is exactly as a novel should be paced -giving us time to savor yet propelling us to turn the page. There are valuable insights into the reality of abuse even in the setting of the great depression. Add to all of this a perfectly consummated mystery and you have MOOD INDIGO.
Xaluenk
The book starts off lightly, like an evocative Blues song -with a couple of instruments playing, teasing us with a hauntingmelody line. We 'witness' the crime and are introduced to some of the main characters. We don't know them well at this point, but they are intriguing enough to keep us reading, wanting to know more.
In Blues tradition, as each new segment of the song is played, more instruments are added, a few at a time, adding depth and power to the resulting sound, and we don't even realize how subtly we've been drawn into the heart of the music. So it is with "Mood Indigo". These are people we'd like to know (most of them, anyway!), and their lives, both past and present, form a rich tapestry which comes to life as we share with them this frigid winter month in the heart of New York City during a year when a lot of us weren't even born yet. The settings in which they operate and the clothes they wear, as well as the language they use, draw us back into that era.
As the rhythm of this story picks up momentum, all of the players are now in place, interacting with each other in fascinating, surprising ways, giving us entrancing 'solo' action at unexpected moments. Their individual 'melody lines' weave in and out, all headed in the same direction, but traveling in their own unique way. Honoria, who occupies the pivotal position in the story, is all at the same time strong and vulnerable, in control and at the mercy of, loved and feared - wonderfully, powerfully human. She is the rich, underlying 'melody line' throughout the piece, and her commitment and loyalty draw the remaining players along with her, including us as observers to their drama. We follow eagerly, gratified to be involved.
The end of the 'song' is approaching, all the 'players' are in full swing. The mystery has drawn us in, full of surprising twists, giving us clues, so far, but no answers. We proceed quickly, devouring paragraphs in great gulps as the story expands. We attempt to take it all in, not wanting to miss anything along the way. Once everyone's part in the performance has been disclosed to the fullest (in a song), and the characters' roles have been defined, giving us the answers to our questions (in a story), the individuals begin to slowly withdraw from the inner circle, backing away one or two at a time, leaving Center Stage to the one with the lead melody line. "Mood Indigo" follows this path. The music slowly fades in our heads, and the book is reluctantly closed, because we're not yet ready to be finished with either the entertaining 'song' or the remarkable people whose lives we've shared.
From the haunting picture on the cover to the last typewritten line, "Mood Indigo" will captivate its readers, as it gives us yet another pearl to add to our string of Charlotte Vale Allen treasures. I laughed out loud, cried real tears, and was disappointed only by the fact that the end of the story came so soon. My thanks, once again, to the author!
Duktilar
I thoroughly enjoyed this book; I really wish it was a series.