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eBook He Who Fears the Wolf (Inspector Sejer Mysteries) download

by Felicity David,Karin Fossum

eBook He Who Fears the Wolf (Inspector Sejer Mysteries) download ISBN: 0151010919
Author: Felicity David,Karin Fossum
Publisher: Harcourt; First U.S. Edition, first printing edition (July 6, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1891 kb
Fb2: 1308 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt mobi doc lrf
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

Karin Fossum is the author of many novels and two collections of short stories. I am a fan of Karin Fossum's Insp Sejer mysteries and have read three of her works

Karin Fossum is the author of many novels and two collections of short stories. I am a fan of Karin Fossum's Insp Sejer mysteries and have read three of her works. In "He Who Fears the Wolf", Ms Fossum delves into the world of a troubled individual afflicted with schizophrenia. Errki has spent a great portion of his life in and out of mental institutions, and on the day he escapes from his latest confinement, an elderly lady living in a remote location deep in the woods is found brutally murdered.

KARIN FOSSUM is the author of the internationally successful Inspector Konrad Sejer crime series. Her recent honors include a Gumshoe Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for mystery/thriller. Библиографические данные. He Who Fears the Wolf Inspector Sejer Mysteries (Том 2).

Home Karin Fossum He Who Fears The Wolf . He who fears the wolf, . The author of poetry, short stories and several novels, her Inspector Sejer series has been published in twenty-six countries. Also by karin fossum. This electronic book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher's prior consent in any form other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser.

See what your friends are reading. Jeremy Megraw has 448 books on his read shelf: Hunted by Arne Dahl, The Girl Without Skin by Mads Peder Nordbo, Big Sister by Gunnar Staalesen, The Big S. He Who Fears the Wolf (Inspector Sejer Mysteries). Discover ideas about Crime Fiction. He Who Fears the Wolf (Inspector Sejer Mysteries): Karin Fossum, Felicity David. Crime Fiction Fiction Writing Fiction Books I Love Books Books To Read Good Books New York Public Library Detective Series Mystery Series.

In a nutshell, the books were what I'd expected A friend and I have been reading lots of Scandinavian mysteries since we finished the Stieg Larson books.

In a nutshell, the books were what I'd expected. He Who Fears the Wolf was the one I liked the best of the three I read (the other were Don't Look Back and When the Devil Holds the Candle). A friend and I have been reading lots of Scandinavian mysteries since we finished the Stieg Larson books. We read all of Henning Mankell, who is probably the best mystery writer around today, along with Ruth Rendell, but both of them are getting away from what I would consider "pure" mystery.

Start by marking He Who Fears the Wolf (Konrad Sejer, as Want to Read . In a nutshell, the books were what I'd expected.

Start by marking He Who Fears the Wolf (Konrad Sejer, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Fossum's writing gave me my love of Scandanavian mystery writers and I seek those writings out. Hands down,though, Fossum's work is the best I have come across so far.

Norway's Chief Inspector Konrad Sejer hunts a bank robber who's taken a murder suspect hostage. by Karin Fossum & translated by Felicity David.

Place of Publication. Karin Fossum made her literary debut in Norway with a collection of poetry in 1974. She has since published another volume of poetry, two collections of short stories and one non-crime novel.

Meet Inspector Sejer: smart and enigmatic, tough but fair. At the foot of the imposing Kollen Mountain lies a small.

Author: Karin Fossum. The second Inspector Sejer mystery from Norway’s Queen of Crime. Superb plotting, fresh style and compassionate, detailed treatment of characters have made the Insepctor Sejer Mysteries bestsellers in their native Norway. A twelve-year-old boy runs wildly into his local police station claiming to have seen Halldis Horn’s brutally murdered corpse. Errki Johrma, an escaped psychiatric patient and known town misfit, was sighted at the scene disappearing into the woods. But in a novel that will keep you desperate to turn each new page to find out more, Fossum brilliantly ensures that things are rarely as they would at first appear.

Inspector Sejer is hard at work again, investigating the brutal murder of a woman who lived alone in the middle of the woods. The chief suspect is another loner, a schizophrenic recently escaped from a mental institution. The only witness is a twelve-year-old boy, overweight, obsessed with archery, and a resident at a home for delinquents. When a demented man robs a nearby bank and accidentally takes the suspect hostage, the three misfits are drawn into an uneasy alliance. Shrewdly, patiently, as is his way, Inspector Sejer confronts a case where the strangeness of the crime is matched only by the strangeness of the criminals, and where small-town prejudices warp every piece of information he tries to collect. Fossum once again provides extraordinary insight into marginalized lives and richly evokes the atmosphere she captured so brilliantly in Don't Look Back.
Comments: (7)
Jugore
First: This is not a police procedural. It's not an Inspector Sejer novel.
Second: The book does not conveniently repeat a standard format like so many "series" books do. The reader won't be in the comfort zone of 'reading their weekly tv show.' This is a character driven crime novel with Inspector Sejer in it.
Third: This is not a good crime novel.

I've tried to think of this book like a movie. In film, you can often get away with a convoluted and complex series of events, unbelievable events, because the viewer sees it unfold before their eyes (The use of video recreations in trials is limited because of its power to make juries believe its version of events). As weak as this is as a book, I think a movie version would fail also.
The book is readable, but you'll quickly get the feeling the writer is throwing in everything but the kitchen sink to keep your interest and move things along. In a good Jim Thompson novel (which this can be compared to, in a BAD way), the action is driven, pushed along by a series of events. But each driving event feels either unavoidable, or inevitable.
In this book nothing feels inevitable. Nothing feels honest. The reader is constantly aware of the writer pulling strings throughout.
Rather than write a finely crafted book that forces the plot and pulls the reader along, in this instance the writer has chosen to simply push the entire book along, like a broken down car.
Add in a neophyte use of crime novel elements. There's nothing refined about the plot. I can hear a sophomore writer's voice anxiously telling me, "You know what happens next? THIS happens next!"
In the end it's as if the writer decided to advance Sejer's character one step along his romantic path and tacked on an unfinished backstory to do it.
Roru
I am a fan of Karin Fossum's Insp Sejer mysteries and have read three of her works [two others are on my nightstand waiting to be read]. In "He Who Fears the Wolf", Ms Fossum delves into the world of a troubled individual afflicted with schizophrenia. Errki has spent a great portion of his life in and out of mental institutions, and on the day he escapes from his latest confinement, an elderly lady living in a remote location deep in the woods is found brutally murdered. The only witness apparently is a troubled, obese young delinquent, Kannick Snellingen who informs the local police chief. Because of the gravity of the crime, Chief Insp Konrad Sejer is brought in to investigate the case. Matters are complicated by another crime - a bank robbery, in which the chief murder suspect from the previous case, Errki, is found to have been taken hostage by the unidentified robber.

This a tautly-written suspense and psychological thriller - one of the most interesting story arcs in this novel is the dynamics of the relationship between the robber, Morgan and Errki. Though Morgan holds a weapon and seems to be the one in charge,the reader gets the sense that this is not really the case, especially as the story progresses. The way these two individuals interact really drives the story and makes for interesting psychological analysis.

Meanwhile, Insp Sejer tries to solve the case in his usual style - calm, intuitive and deliberate, leaving no stones unturned, and in the process even experiencing a romantic epiphany [Sejer has been widowed a number of years and has been leading a rather quiet existence].

I'd recommend this book to fans of insightful psychological thrillers.
Enila
Norwegian writer Karin Fossum's characters often operate on the outer circle of society. In "He Who...", a psychotherapist who has been caring for a murder suspect argues to Chief Inspector Konrad Sejer that "All the interesting people in the world are losers"..."Or rather, those we call losers. Every type of deviation contains an element of rebellion...and I've never been able to understamd a lack of rebelliousness." The focus of her comments is a patient, Errki Johrma, the central figure in this murder mystery and a young man who has been so damaged by childhood traumas that he believes his physical being self-destructs continuously. Errki is brilliant but the consummate social exile--reviled and feared by the community that he lives in and enable to communicate in any normal way. It's not surprising that he is suspected of killing an elderly farm woman after his escape from a mental institution.

"He Who Fears the Wolf" is largely about Errki's unlikely relationship with an inept bank robber, who is also one of society's losers. This brotherhood of suffering somehow provides a psychic salve to Errki in a way that conventional psychotherapy has been unable to accomplish. The already dark story becomes pitch black when a third damaged character is added to the mix.

This is very much a psychological drama rather than a conventional crime mystery, although the estimable Inspector Sejer and partner Svarre are involved on the perimeter. The story features some of Karin Fossum's most interesting writing. It is always engaging if not always entertaining. Recommended.
Fesho
I bought this book for my Kindle recently, mainly because it was on sale. I read it straight through to the end and found it mildly entertaining--but as I read along, I realized I'd read it before. No, I didn't remember what was going to happen next; I didn't remember how it would all come out in the end--I didn't even remember the seemingly memorable title. I was simply aware, page by page and paragraph by paragraph, that I was revisiting things. In fact, it was as almost though what I'd actually read once before was a different book--but one with the same creepy characters caught up the same unpleasant situation, and for the very same reasons. In summary, this book is highly forgettable. I'm giving it three stars because it's readable but won't change your life.