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eBook Murder in the Lincoln Bedroom: An Eleanor Roosevelt Mystery (Eleanor Roosevelt Mysteries) download

by Elliott Roosevelt

eBook Murder in the Lincoln Bedroom: An Eleanor Roosevelt Mystery (Eleanor Roosevelt Mysteries) download ISBN: 0312979193
Author: Elliott Roosevelt
Publisher: Minotaur Books; 1st edition (February 18, 2002)
Language: English
ePub: 1231 kb
Fb2: 1631 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf mbr lit doc
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

Book 21 of 22 in the Eleanor Roosevelt mysteries Series.

Book 21 of 22 in the Eleanor Roosevelt mysteries Series. Once again, Eleanor Roosevelt calmly juggles her official duties as First Lady with her unofficial role as amateur sleuth in this unpretentious, undemanding offering attributed to her late son Elliott, who according to St. Martin's left behind a number of unpublished manuscripts when he died. When lawyer Paul Weyrich, special White House counsel, turns up dead in the Lincoln Bedroom with an unauthorized gun in his suit jacket, Mrs. Roosevelt takes on the case, aided by old friend . police captain Ed Kennelly.

This from the Eleanor Roosevelt Murder series authored by her son Elliot Roosevelt. If you like mysteries, politics and history you might really enjoy these books

This from the Eleanor Roosevelt Murder series authored by her son Elliot Roosevelt. If you like mysteries, politics and history you might really enjoy these books. The basic plot line is that a murder is committed, often in the White House and the First Lady uses her logical prowess to solve the mystery. It is a traditional mystery format where there is a limited list of suspects and you are invited to think along with the detective. What makes this series particularly interesting is the This from the Eleanor Roosevelt Murder series authored by her son Elliot Roosevelt. If you like mysteries,.

Roosevelt, Elliott, 1910-. Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962, White House (Washington, . Women detectives, Presidents' spouses. New York : Thomas Dunne Books. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Roosevelt, Taft and Debs are running for the White House. Ty Cobb and Shoeless Joe Jackson are battling for baseball's batting crown. Shelve Shot Through the Hearth (A Fixer-Upper Mystery, Want to Read.

Book in the Eleanor Roosevelt Series). by Elliott Roosevelt. Fiction Historical Literature & Fiction Mystery Mystery, Thriller & Suspense Women Sleuths

Book in the Eleanor Roosevelt Series). Fiction Historical Literature & Fiction Mystery Mystery, Thriller & Suspense Women Sleuths. Recently Viewed and Featured. The Celebrity 411 : Spotlight on Paz de la Huerta, Including Her Personal Life, Famous Television Shows and Blockbusters Such As Enter the Void, Boardw.

Persisting in the fiction that the late Elliott Roosevelt left behind dozens of manuscripts, his publisher, abetted by (likely) ghostwriter William Harrington, once again presents First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt as sleuth. The year is 1943, and Winston Churchill, his daughter Sarah, and Field Marshall Alan Brooke are meeting secretly with General George Marshall, a perpetually grinning General Eisenhower, plus his toothsome driver Kay Summersby, and FDR to plot war strategy when the bludgeoned body of West Wing lawyer Paul Weyrich is found making a bloody mess of the Lincoln bedroom

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (/ˈɛlɪnɔːr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political figure, diplomat and activist

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (/ˈɛlɪnɔːr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political figure, diplomat and activist. She served as the First Lady of the United States from March 4, 1933, to April 12, 1945, during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office, making her the longest-serving First Lady of the United States. Roosevelt served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.

Eleanor soon realizes someone may have been trying to assassinate the president, but it is unclear why, after stabbing the officer . Elliott Roosevelt, son of Franklin and Eleanor, was a former writer and rancher. Библиографические данные.

Eleanor soon realizes someone may have been trying to assassinate the president, but it is unclear why, after stabbing the officer, the suspect didn't crash into the bedroom and finish the job. Furthermore, it appears the killer knew the White House and its routines sufficiently well, leading the First Lady to question the motives of her White House staffers and grow wary of she and the President's new surroundings.

Elliott Roosevelt (shown here with his wife, Patty), son of Franklin and Eleanor, was a former writer and rancher. He died in 1990 but left behind a number of unpublished manuscripts to be enjoyed by readers in the years to come. From Publishers Weekly: Once again, Eleanor Roosevelt calmly juggles her official duties as First Lady with her unofficial role as amateur sleuth in this unpretentious, undemanding offering attributed to her late son Elliott, who according to St.

Elliott Roosevelt, son of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was born in New York City on September 23, 1910. His books range from an insider's view of his famous family to mystery novels set at the White House. Roosevelt died on October 27, 1990.

It is 1943 and upon the eve of the Trident Conference-a highly classified council attended by FDR, Winston Churchill, and Dwight Eisenhower with the purpose of planning an invasion of Western Europe-the White House is aflutter with preparations and the presence of extra Secret Service agents and soldiers. When a body is discovered in the Lincoln Bedroom while the conferees are still in session, Eleanor Roosevelt knows that in order to keep the murder (as well as the Conference) a secret from the prying eyes of the press, not to mention foreign agents, she must solve it herself. Eleanor soon learns that the victim, Paul Weyrich, was a White House employee-one of the President's top advisors-who had been having an affair with his secretary. At first glance, it looks to be a crime of passion, instigated by Mr. Weyrich's refusal to marry his secretary. However, the deeper Eleanor digs into the case, the more clouded and uncertain the investigation becomes. Gradually, Eleanor discovers that the victim was part of a plot to assassinate the President, and she embarks on a daring plan to trap the assassin, using FDR as bait. Eleanor's skills will be put to the ultimate test as she must race to solve the mystery before the assassin strikes again.
Comments: (6)
Runemane
Elliott Roosevelt has written a series of mysteries in which his mother, the First Lady, solves one or more murders. Each gives us a mystery plus a sense of the White House and popular culture during the Roosevelt administration in the 1930-1940 era. In this story, it is 1943. The allies and the axis powers are fighting desperately around the world. Winston Churchill and his Generals have come to the White House secretly to plan the invasion of France. But upstairs, a policeman finds the body of one of the President's aides, murdered in the Lincoln Bedroom. Realizing that this must be kept secret because of the conference, Eleanor Roosevelt sets out to solve the killing. With the aid of a Secret Service agent and a Washington Police detective, she uncovers and thwarts a plot to assassinate the President. The book is enjoyable, more for the flavor of 1943 than for its simple plot, but it is a smooth-reading story.
Rich Vulture
I like the history in this book. It was interesting to learn about the quarters of the White House then.
Anayanis
This was my third of the Eleanor Roosevelt mysteries and I feel the same as I did in my review of the first. "As a historian I was tickled by some of the historical minutae that doesn't often surface about the White House or the Roosevelts. It is a light weight mystery but what a lark."
Samulkis
In 1943, the Roosevelt White House worries about the corpse of attorney Paul Weyrich found in the Lincoln Bedroom due to the timing of the event. FDR hosts a critical conference attended by Prime Minister Churchill and European Theater of Operation Commander Eisenhower with the agenda being the plan to liberate Europe from the Nazis.

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt accompanied by her friend local police officer Ed Kennelly begin investigating the homicide thinking it is probably a stand alone murder. As Eleanor digs deeper into the background of the culprit, she soon realizes that the homicide is part of a gamut to kill her spouse. With the free world at stake, Eleanor sets in motion a plan to use Franklin as bait to capture an assassin before the deadly deed occurs.

The latest Eleanor Roosevelt amateur sleuth novel, MURDER IN THE LINCOLN BEDROOM, is typical of the long running series. The story line is fun but a no brainer and the motives when revealed seem feeble when considering the momentous event envisioned by the criminals. Still Elliot Roosevelt writes in a easy to read, smooth manner including using self deprecating humor when other noted twentieth century figures discuss the shortcomings of the Icon,s son. The opportunity to see the major players during the long running FDR Administration turns this novel like its twenty or so predecessors into an enjoyable, albeit one-sided experience for historical mystery buffs who are not concerned with a historiographer's perspective.

Harriet Klausner
Fek
... and very boring. The pace of the book is slow, and it is very conservative in its ideas. Even though I don't enjoy excessive dirty language, the morals of this book are so different than the 'modern' ones that it makes it hard to thoroughly understand, especially for a non - American who doesn't have the proper historical background.
Then why 2 stars? Because I think that this is the sort of book can appeal to people who are looking for all the points mentioned above in a book - the slower pace, the historical perspective and 'name dropping', etc.
Runehammer
For anyone who loves history (and my preferred historical periods are the Great Depression and World War II), Elliott Roosevelt offers the sense that you are actually there, reliving the events themselves. So many facts that he includes in his books are historically accurate, and a delight to encounter in a novel. His mysteries are, to me, less about solving various murders than about his fascinating parents, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. And the mysteries are pretty good, too! I'd recommend them to anyone.