carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Nine Wrong Answers (Carr, John Dickson)

eBook Nine Wrong Answers (Carr, John Dickson) download

by John Dickson Carr

eBook Nine Wrong Answers (Carr, John Dickson) download ISBN: 0786701749
Author: John Dickson Carr
Publisher: Carroll & Graf; 3 edition (December 21, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 168
ePub: 1715 kb
Fb2: 1952 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: txt docx lrf mobi
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

The 9 wrong answers; a novel for the curious. by. Carr, John Dickson, 1906-1977.

The 9 wrong answers; a novel for the curious. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

This book, like many by John Dickson Carr, has a powerful gothic element- a sense of fear, dread, and doom that draws the reader into the book. I was impelled to read this entire novel in little more than 24 hours. In some ways, the first half of the book was more gripping than the conclusion. While the crimes are ingeniously solved, they are almost too contrived. Carr almost goes too far in forcing us to see how every tiny detail thoughout the book was "in line" with the denoument.

The Nine Wrong Answers book. Generally speaking, I adore Carr and his alter ego Carter Dickson and devour his books like they might disappear out of my hands before I finish

The Nine Wrong Answers book. Generally speaking, I adore Carr and his alter ego Carter Dickson and devour his books like they might disappear out of my hands before I finish. I like his impossible crimes and his effortless way of playing fair with the reader and still making you come up with the wrong answer. And I have a very clear memory of being astounded and delighted by The Nine Wrong Answers when I discovered it at the tiny little public library in Spencer, IN twenty-some years ago.

The Nine Wrong Answers, first published in 1952, is a detective story by John Dickson Carr which does not feature any of Carr's series detectives. It is an expansion of Carr's 1942 radio play "Will You Make A Bet With Death". This novel is a whodunnit mystery, with an emphasis on the puzzle aspect.

Die spannendsten Detektiv Geschichten. Edgar Wallace, Arthur Conan Doyle, Stanley Ellen, John Dickson Carr, Arthur Morrison, Ernest Bramah, Maurice Leblanc, . Chesterton, Edgar Allan Poe, Emmuska Baroness Orzy, Jacques Futrelle, Guy Newell Boothby. It Walks by Night: A Paris Mystery. John Dickson Carr, Martin Edwards. Val Gielgud, John Dickson Carr. I could not put it down. It starts off fast and doesn't slow down until the final page. I've read a lot of Carr's books and got to know his style somewhat so I was almost right about some of the answers but all the twists are guaranteed to outsmart practically any reader.

This thorough, fun-to-read book answers those questions and many more. Affordable books great deals on new, used and rare/out of print bestsellers. Gymnastics in 1936 was pretty tame – Nothing like what we have today. How did Kerri Strug go from Olympic hopeful to Olympic champion? How does Dominique Moceanu spend a typical day? This thorough, fun-to-read book answers those questions and many more.

Showing all works by author. Would you like to see only ebooks? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next . The life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

The Nine Wrong Answers, first published in 1952, is a detective story by John Dickson Carr which does not feature . John Dickson Carr was an American author of detective stories, who also published using the pseudonyms Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson and Roger Fairbairn. It is an expansion of Carr's 1942 radio play Will You Make A Bet With Death.

John Dickson Carr (November 30, 1906 – February 27, 1977) was an American author of detective stories, who also published using the pseudonyms Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson and Roger Fairbairn. Carr is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of so-called "Golden Age" mysteries; complex, plot-driven stories in which the puzzle is paramount.

Does anyone have nine wrong answers by John dickson carr. Нравится Показать список оценивших. Luna Tsuki 17 фев 2019 в 10:35.

Carr's forte is the rational crime problem costumed as an eerie tale of the seemingly supernatural. This tale set in London is an elaborate puzzle that concerns a large inheritance and contains a wonderful scene at Sherlock Holmes' rooms on Baker Street.
Comments: (7)
Wizer
This book, like many by John Dickson Carr, has a powerful gothic element-- a sense of fear, dread, and doom that draws the reader into the book. I was impelled to read this entire novel in little more than 24 hours.
The book gets off to a rapid, fast-paced start and does not slow down. In some ways, the first half of the book was more gripping than the conclusion. While the crimes are ingeniously solved, they are almost too contrived. Carr almost goes too far in forcing us to see how every tiny detail thoughout the book was "in line" with the denoument.
The characters were well developed, and the evil characters seem to be Carr's forte. There's also a love interest in the book, and the sense of a loner protagonist going up against enormous odds.
Generally speaking, I liked the book and feel I got my money's worth. A caution for older readers such as me-- the print size on the page is uncomfortably small.
Murn
Bill Dawson is an Englishman in New York who gets a strange proposition. Larry Hurst offers Dawson $10,000 to impersonate him in London. Hurst's uncle has sent him a letter offering to make him his primary heir if he will agree to visit once a week for six months. But Hurst was tormented by the old man as a child and is afraid the old man means him harm. He asks Dawson to take his place and impersonate him with the old man so he can get the inheritance without having to face the old buzzard. As if this isn't weird enough, Hurst is poisoned hours later and pleads with Dawson not to let him down. The story has many more twists and turns which I won't reveal as it would rob new readers of the ability to enjoy the story.

As mysteries go, this is a bit of an odd duck. The story is convoluted from the start and gets progressively more so as it moves along. It is short, at 186 pages so at least it doesn't drag. The title comes from footnotes in the novel that suggest possible solutions that readers might be considering and then tells you that the answer is wrong. It's an odd approach that pulls you out of the story without adding anything positive to the novel. The characters are pretty cardboard. Dawson has some depth to him, but the others come out of casting central for mystery stereotypes with no additional depth supplied.

This was my first experience with John Dickson Carr and it will almost certainly be my last. The book isn't really bad but time has passed it by. The characters are flat and boring. The mystery is convoluted but not particularly interesting. When reading the solution, I really just wanted to hurry up and finish so I could put the book down and be done with it. I'm sure fans of the author would probably enjoy this, but I wouldn't recommend it to anyone else.
Mavegelv
Interesting book. I felt as though I had run a race by the time it was finished.
Conjukus
This is one of the better mysteries I have read lately. Although it was a bit melodramatic sometimes - the love story was a bit too contrived and coincidental- the story reads like an old movie. There are bits of mystery, some horror elements, and sort of a game between the reader and the author in which the author- through footnotes- dissuades the reader why the the obvious assumption is wrong - hence, the nine wrong answers. This was a definite page turner as I was never sure where the story was going. The characters are scary and the book has a forboding atmosphere, but this is an original!
Gamba
This is a non-series novel by Carr, but, while the reader will miss Gideon Fell and Sir Henry Merrivale, the characters of this book will fascinate. It is one of Carr's most ingenious plots. And while there are no locked rooms, the mystery and its solution are absolutely brilliant - and, I suspect, will completely fool the reader, despite the author's rigorous adherence to fair play. Carr was a genius at misdirection, of course, and he is at his absolute best here in that regard. There is more than enough action, and the device of the "nine wrong answers" is wonderful. Highly recommended (and when will an enterprising publisher get this back in print?).
Adrierdin
One of the most consistently entertaining later Carrs, reminiscent of classic Hitchcock. Bill Dawson, a young Englishman working in America, is employed by a fellow expatriate to impersonate him for six months in order to inherit his splendidly sadistic uncle's fortune; the nephew is poisoned, and suspicion falls upon Dawson, who travels to Britain to avenge the murder. Full of excitement and tension, with just a touch of diffuseness in the shift from England to America-splendid scenes at the B.B.C. and in Uncle Gaylord's flat. Smash surprise solution given, very aptly, in Sherlock Holmes's rooms. Catch this Carr!
Water
I finished this book in one sitting. I could not put it down. It starts off fast and doesn't slow down until the final page. I've read a lot of Carr's books and got to know his style somewhat so I was almost right about some of the answers but all the twists are guaranteed to outsmart practically any reader.

The little footnotes at strategic points (The Nine Wrong Answers) keep you on track to some degree and true to Carr fashion, the real clues are there to spot if you're observant enough. I have to admit I took this one as a challenge and spent ages thinking about what I'd read, going back over sections and re-reading bits to glean more information.

Readers of Carr who enjoy his detectives will perhaps be disappointed in this one as the "detective" in this case is the reader him/herself. However, I had no hesitation in giving this five stars, it was a stunner of a book.