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eBook Jerusalem Inn download

by Martha Grimes

eBook Jerusalem Inn download ISBN: 0440141818
Author: Martha Grimes
Publisher: Dell; Reissue edition (October 1, 1990)
Language: English
ePub: 1403 kb
Fb2: 1229 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr azw rtf doc
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

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Bestselling author Martha Grimes is the author of more than thirty books, including twenty-two Richard Jury mysteries.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Bestselling author Martha Grimes is the author of more than thirty books, including twenty-two Richard Jury mysteries. She is also the author of Double Double, a dual memoir of alcoholism written with her son. The winner of the 2012 Mystery Writers of America Grandmaster Award, Grimes lives in Bethesda, Maryland. Библиографические данные. Jerusalem Inn A Richard Jury Mystery.

Martha Grimes presents us, in this 5th book of her Jury series, a literary mystery rather than an action adventure or strict police procedural. We get detailed and intimate looks into both Jury and Plant before the murders are discovered as well as during the investigative stages. We learn more about the source of Jury’s chronic depression, a source that actually resonates with the circumstances surrounding Helen Minton’s murder.

Martha Grimes ner toughness; to the sanguine . .

Martha Grimes ner toughness; to the sanguine attitude, but businesslike approach. It was that with which she confronted Jury’s question about her husband and Beatrice Sleight. I’ve known for some time, of course. Her directness was disorienting.

At Jerusalem Inn, a mentally-challenged teen-age orphan is allowed to perform chores for room and board. At Spinney Abbey, a teen-age nobleman chaffs under the strict rules of his loving elderly guardian. She wants him to uphold the ancient heritage of the English nobility. It was a mishmash of characters that you can't remember how they got there or why. It's a puzzlement that all the scenes where Inspector Jury appears are successful.

Jerusalem Inn (Boston: Little, Brown, 1984). The End of the Pier (Ballantine Books, 1993). McFarland, December 16, 2010). "Best Literary Mysteries (1435 books)". Help the Poor Struggler (Boston: Little, Brown, 1985). The Deer Leap (Boston: Little, Brown, 1985). Hotel Paradise (Knopf, 1996). Retrieved October 20, 2019. "Awardees" nerowolfe. "Mystery Writers of America Announces the 2012 Edgar Award Nominees" prnewswire. com, January 19, 2012.

Jerusalem Inn. by. Martha Grimes. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on April 11, 2012. 0 5 Author: Martha Grimes. From the rough but colorful pub that provides the book’s title, to the snowboard Gothic estate nearby, the chilly English landscape has never held more atmosphere-or thwarted romance. And Jury will never have a more mysterious Christmas. Five Days Before Christmas: On his way to a brief holiday (he thinks) Jury meets a woman he could fall in love with. (Book in the Richard Jury Series). Bad tidings come to Scotland Yard's Richard Jury and his sidekick, Melrose Plant, when clues from two corpses lead them to a remote country inn where holiday cheer turns to fear.

Used availability for Martha Grimes's Jerusalem In.

October 1987 : UK Hardback.

A white Christmas couldn't make Newcastle any less dreary for Scotland Yard's Superintendent Richard Jury--until he met a beautiful woman in a snow-covered graveyard.  Sensual, warm, and a bit mysterious, she could have put some life into his sagging holiday spirit.  But the next time Jury saw her, she was cold--and dead.  Melrose Plant.  Jury's aristocratic sidekick wasn't faring much better.  Snow bound at a stately mansion with a group of artists, critics, and idle-but-titled rich, he, too, encountered a lovely lady . . . or rather, stumbled over her corpse.  What linked these two yuletide murders was a remote country pub where snooker, a Nativity scene, and an old secret would uncover a killer . . . or yet another death.
Comments: (7)
Andronrad
In 1982, American Martha Grimes started a series of mystery novels featuring Scotland Yard detective Richard Jury and his official side-kick Sgt. Wiggins and his unofficial side-kick reluctant aristocrat Melrose Plant. In each, the action centers around an old pub. There must be a steady stream of mystery-loving Anglophiles in the U.S. because it's been a very successful series and she's still cranking them out.

Jury is the perfect hero for a series - modest, likable, and absolutely incapable of sustaining a romantic relationship for more than one book. Sometimes his romances never get out of the starting gate and sometimes they look promising before the lady dies. In this fifth book in the series, he's headed to Newcastle to spend Christmas with his only living relative - a whining, cadging cousin and her hard-luck family. He goes reluctantly, but heroically. It's the right thing to do and he does it. That's why you can't help liking the guy.

On the way, he meets an attractive, wealthy woman who seems to have buried herself in a small village for no apparent reason. What is she looking for there? And did her search have anything to do with her death? Before Jury can make much progress, another death occurs and this time, it's definitely a murder. And one of the house-guests is (you guessed it!) none other than Jury's friend Melrose Plant. The two of them must try to figure out a motive and who had that motive. They are hampered by the unwelcome presence of Plant's awful Aunt Agatha. She was not (sadly) the victim.

So you have a grungy old inn where the patrons are all on the dole and given to senseless fighting and a stately mansion filled with wealthy, prominent people who are too well-bred to ever be suspected of wrong-doing. But there's that body and they were snowed in so it was one of them. And there's a dreary orphanage with a shifty director who seems less interested in the welfare of the children than in using her position to line her pockets. Blackmail, anyone?

At Jerusalem Inn, a mentally-challenged teen-age orphan is allowed to perform chores for room and board. At Spinney Abbey, a teen-age nobleman chaffs under the strict rules of his loving elderly guardian. She wants him to uphold the ancient heritage of the English nobility. He wants to play pool.

The whole premise is absurd, but you can't have a mystery without a murder and people do commit murders for seemingly trivial reasons. The ending is over-the-top outrageous. No cop could get by with it and a sane one wouldn't try. It doesn't really matter. People read Grimes for her skillful writing and the charm of her characters. If they seem unrealistic, well, what do we know about how the English do things?

It's not her best, but it's far better than the average mystery series. That's why devoted fans of Jury and his creator keep snapping them up.
Yalone
A different editor might have changed the outcome of this book #6 in Martha Grimes series. It was a mishmash of characters that you can't remember how they got there or why. It's a puzzlement that all the scenes where Inspector Jury appears are successful. If the ensemble characters are on stage, you almost give up. Jury is a likable character, which saves the book as far as I'm concerned. Do you play snooker? After pages about games that are being played, you probably won't take it up. Too much of a good thing. All of a sudden the crime is solved, a character that confesses...what? why? In all this confusion, I underlined some nice pieces of writing, a great metaphor, a description, a detail. I'm willing to give Grimes another chance, but hope Jerusalem Inn is just a poor example of her work.
Marr
Superintendent Richard Jury of Scotland Yard seems to constantly be meeting beautiful women to whom he is instantly attracted, but the attraction never goes anywhere. The women never stick. That's true again in Jerusalem Inn, but at least this time the beautiful woman has a good reason for not pursuing a relationship. She's dead.

Jury meets the lovely Helen Minton in a snow-covered graveyard in the Newcastle village of Washington at Christmastime. He has taken days off to spend Christmas with his cousin's family in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and, delaying the inevitability of their company on a afternoon, is taking a walk in the graveyard when he comes upon Helen. She seems unwell and he walks her back to her home and makes a date to have dinner with her. But, on the appointed day, when he goes to collect her at the Old Hall museum where she works, he finds the local police already there. Helen Minton has been discovered dead.

She had a heart condition and at first it appears that her death may have been due to natural causes, but a postmortem confirms that she was poisoned.

Jury sets off through the snowbound countryside to find her only known relative, a cousin who is in a nearby village. Meanwhile, his aristocratic frequent sidekick, Melrose Plant, is already headed for that same village, along with Aunt Agatha and Vivian Rivington, one of Jury's previous "beautiful women who didn't stick." Melrose, Agatha, and Vivian are going to a Christmas house party at a famous critic's house, along with a number of writers and artists.

Tensions are apparent from the beginning among the various house partiers, but who would ever guess that those tensions would end in murder? Well, only someone reading a Martha Grimes cozy mystery perhaps.

Soon, a thoroughly disliked member of the party is found dead in the snow, having been shot, and Jury and the local constabulary, as well as Melrose Plant, seek the murderer. But was this murder somehow related to the murder of Helen Minton and why does the critic's wife seem to be fading fast? Another case of poisoning perhaps?

Well, we can be sure, of course, that Superintendent Jury will make all the necessary connections and that murder will out and justice be served. In a manner of speaking anyway.

This series is a fun and light read, not at all taxing for a hot summer day. All problems are solved and inconvenient facts are swept under the rug by the ending.

And the handsome Richard Jury who is always very attractive to the women and young girls in his cases still hasn't found a woman who'll stick.
Yananoc
I HAVE READ ALL OF THE RICHARD JURY BOOKS EXCEPT FOR THE ONE THAT JUST CAME OUT - GRIMES' FIRST FIVE OR SIX WERE EXCELLENT. THE CHARACTER OF MELROSE PLANT IS SO GOOD THAT HE AND JURY AND WIGGINS MAKE IT ALL WORK . THE OLD CONTEMPTIBLAFTER THAT, HER EARLIER BOOKS ARE BETTER THAN HER LATER ONES, IN MY OPINION. SOME OF THE BOOKS FOCUS ON CHILDREN BEING MURDERED AND THAT BOTHERS ME. THE OLD CONTEMPTIBLES WAS THE FIRST ONE I READ AND THAT GOT ME HOOKED. AFTER THAT I RENTED FROM THE LIBRARY EVERY ONE I COULD GET MY HANDS ON AND TRIED TO READ THEM IN SUCCESSION.
GRIMES IS A MASTER IN THE USE OF ADJECTIVES AND PUTTING DESCRIPTIVE SENTENCES TOGETHER THAT ADD SO MUCH ENJOYMENT TO HER BOOKS. I LIKE THE FACT THAT HER CHARACTERS KEEP RETURNING, AND MELROSE PLANT JUST ADDS TO THE WHOLE STORY IN SOLVING THE MURDERS.