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by Nicholas Blake

eBook Thou Shell of Death (A Hamlyn whodunnit) download ISBN: 0600201627
Author: Nicholas Blake
Publisher: Hamlyn; New Edition edition (1981)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1243 kb
Fb2: 1263 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: docx mobi rtf doc
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

Thou Shell of Death is a dazzlingly complex and addictive read, laced with literary allusions, from a master of. .The Morning After Death. I. The Assistant Commissioner’s Tale.

Thou Shell of Death is a dazzlingly complex and addictive read, laced with literary allusions, from a master of detective fiction. Nicholas Blake was the pseudonym of Poet Laureate Cecil Day-Lewis, who was born in County Laois, Ireland, in 1904. After his mother died in 1906, he was brought up in London by his father, spending summer holidays with relatives in Wexford. He was educated at Sherborne School and Wadham College, Oxford, from which he graduated in 1927.

There’s Trouble Brewing. Nicholas Blake, Thou Shell of Death. Thank you for reading books on BookFrom. The Beast must Die. The Smiler with the Knife. Malice in Wonderland. The Case of the Abominable Snowman. 55. 0. Published: 2003.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Worm of Death The a Hamlyn Whodunnit Blake . Author:Blake, Nicholas. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites

Author:Blake, Nicholas. million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Read full description.

Published November 8th 2018 by Agora Books. Thou Shell of Death (Nigel Strangeways, A Hamlyn whodunnit. Author(s): Nicholas Blake.

Nicholas Blake was the pseudonym of Poet Laureate Cecil Day-Lewis, who was born in County Laois, Ireland in.

Nicholas Blake was the pseudonym of Poet Laureate Cecil Day-Lewis, who was born in County Laois, Ireland in 1904. Blake initially worked as a teacher to supplement his income from his poetry writing and he published his first Nigel Strangeways novel, A Question of Proof, in 1935

Thou Shell of Death book. Nicholas Blake (the pen name of Cecil Day-Lewis) introduced his fictional detective Nigel Strangeways in A Question of Proof, set in a boys prep school

Thou Shell of Death book. Nicholas Blake (the pen name of Cecil Day-Lewis) introduced his fictional detective Nigel Strangeways in A Question of Proof, set in a boys prep school. This second mystery takes place in a more traditional setting, a house party, albeit with a twist. Nigel Strangeways is asked by his uncle, luckily the Assistant Commissioner of Police, to take on a new case. Fergus O'Brien, famous flying ace from WWI and intrepid hero, is staying at the Dower House in Strangeways aunt's estate.

A whodunit or whodunnit (a colloquial elision of "Who done it?" or "Who did it?") is a complex, plot-driven variety of the detective story in which the puzzle regarding who committed the crime is the main focus

A whodunit or whodunnit (a colloquial elision of "Who done it?" or "Who did it?") is a complex, plot-driven variety of the detective story in which the puzzle regarding who committed the crime is the main focus. The reader or viewer is provided with the clues from which the identity of the perpetrator may be deduced before the story provides the revelation itself at its climax. The investigation is usually conducted by an eccentric, amateur, or semi-professional detective.

Nicholas Blake ying at the camp?MoreLess Show More Show Less.

Thou Shell of Death: A Nigel Strangeways Mystery (Paperback). Nicholas Blake (author). Paperback 320 Pages, Published: 03/05/2012. It has all the virtues of culture, intelligence and sensibility that the most exacting connoisseur could ask of detective fiction" Times Literary Supplement "A master of detective fiction" Daily Telegraph "The Nicholas Blake books are something quite by themselves in English detective fiction" - Elizabeth Bowen.

Private inquiry agent Nigel Strangeways meets his future wife, the female explorer, Georgia Cavendish, who finds herself mixed up in a nasty piece of business in this 1936 case.
Comments: (7)
Worla
Nigel Strangeways, struggling to make awkward tea-time conversation with his old-fashioned uncle and aunt Lord and Lady Marlinworth, is relieved by the sudden intrusion of his former guardian, younger and livelier uncle Sir John Strangeways, Scotland Yard Assistant Commissioner, hoping for a cocktail. He doesn't get it (Lord Marlinworth disdains such "American beverages"), but he does succeed in enlisting Nigel's help in a delicate situation..

Fergus O'Brien, a famous aviator now retired, has recently rented the Dower House at Chatcombe, the Somerset country home of the Marlinworths. Since moving there O'Brien has received three mysterious threatening letters: an unknown person intends to kill him, for unknown reasons, on the Feast of St. Stephen, the day after Christmas. He has asked Sir John to recommend an amiable, intelligent private investigator who can identify the source of the letters, and prevent his murder, without disrupting his quiet country life. Sir John has told him about his detective nephew, and O'Brien thinks he would be perfect. He's planning a Christmas house party, and hopes Nigel will be his guest.

Knowing O'Brien's popular image as a war hero, daredevil flyer, and all-round free spirit, Nigel is surprised to find him a rather small, vulnerable, philosophical person, obviously far from well, seemingly close to death and resigned to the inevitable. Still, O'Brien fears the threat of murder, having set himself one last important task to complete. He is designing what he believes will be the war plane of the future, but fearing his plans will fall into the hands of a foreign government, he has kept the crucial details safe inside his own head. Though his personal feelings now incline towards pacifism, he expects there will always be wars, and the nation with the best planes will win.

He admits he has made more enemies in his adventure-filled life than he can name, but his suspicion is that the author of the threatening letters may not be an enemy but someone he considers a friend. This is why he needs a detective at his Christmas party, to observe the people he feels closest to, including his heirs, and determine, before it's too late, if one of them means to kill him.

The morning of St. Stephen's Day Nigel awakens to an unusual silence. Overnight the ground has been blanketed by snow. Nigel's plan had been to check on his host during the night in the wooden hut where he often slept (gratifying an austere taste acquired in wartime), but Nigel has slept late and unusually soundly. By this time O'Brien himself is normally out feeding the birds. Nigel rushes out to the hut, finding the aviator shot through the heart, a revolver beside his dead hand. Nigel is devastated to have failed the man who had so quickly earned his deep respect and affection. It looks like suicide, but how could it have been?

Beautifully written, as befits the work of a Poet Laureate. A much more coherent, organic story line and Nigel's character more professional and credible than in his first mystery, published a year earlier.
Paster
Nigel is visiting his aunt and uncle, Lord and Lady Marlinworth. His His Uncle, who raised him, Sir John Strangeways, Assistant Commissioner of Police arrives with a job for Nigel. The Great Fergus O'Brien, an ex-flyer in WWI with the most German kills, is staying at Dower House on the Marlinworth's estate, and needs some help. He has received three threatening letters that he will be killed the day after Christmas. Nigel travels to the estate with the Marlinworths and gets to know Fergus some before the others (who might include the man sending the notes) arrive to spend Christmas. Fergus seems to spend a lot of time, including sleeping, in a hut in the front yard. The first guest to arrive was Philip Starling, an expert in Homeric civilisation and literature whom Nigel knows. Then, Lucilla Thrale (a very attractive vain blond) and Knott-Sloman, who owns a pub with a poor reputation. Lastly, Georgia Cavendish, the African explorer and her middle-aged brother Edward arrive. Lucilla has been sleeping with Fergus and used to sleep with Cavendish. After two days, Nigel has noticed nothing suspicious. Also in the house are Arthur, Fergus' servant and the cook.

On Christmas night, it appeared that both Nigel and Arthur might have been slipped something to make them sleep. The next morning, they wake late, see footsteps in the snow going to the hut, and hurry to find Fergus in the hut. Fergus is lying dead in the kitchen, his revolver next to his hand. Nigel calls in police Superintendent Bleakley and his uncle. It appears to be suicide, but Nigel is sure it's murder and finally convinces Bleakley.

Meanwhile, Nigel is falling in love with Georgia, and all the members of the party are possible suspects. However, soon an attempt is made to kill Arthur, and then Knott-Sloman is found dead. The three main suspects are now Georgia, her brother Edward, and Lucilla. Nigel realizes he needs to find out more about old history of what happened in Ireland before the war. He talks to a man who fought with Fergus to find that Fergus never talked about his former life and that he signed up with Fear, who talked a lot about his big house and his sister. Fergus spent a lot of time trying to protect Fear, until Fear was shot down when he was ordered to a different air group. Nigel makes a quick trip to Ireland and learns more history which finally convinces him of the real culprit.

The story ends with another death, and a completely new version of what happened! This book has a very complicated plot and a real surprise ending.
Folsa
Nigel Strangeways, private investigator, is invited to spend Christmas with flying ace, Fergus O'Brian, who has rented the Dower House from his aunt and uncle. Fergus's life appears to be under threat from an anonymous letter writer. Nigel finds himself part of a Christmas house party with a selection of people who might or might not be the letter writer.

When Fergus is found shot dead with his own revolver on Boxing Day morning in circumstances which indicate it may have been suicide Nigel is faced with a complex case to unravel. But first he has to convince the local police that it isn't suicide. I really enjoyed this well plotted and well written crime story which recreates a bygone age as it was first published in the nineteen thirties. The characters are interesting and believable as is the motivation for the murder when it is finally uncovered.

Nicholas Blake was the pseudonym of Cecil Day Lewis, academic and poet laureate and quality of the writing reflects this. Latin quotations are not translated for the reader, though the gist is clear from the context. Even if you consider yourself well read you may find yourself resorting to a dictionary while reading. It served to remind me of the much higher standard of education expected of crime story readers in the nineteen thirties though it did not spoil my enjoyment of the story. If you enjoy Ngaio Marsh and Agatha Christie then try Nicholas Blake.
Bynelad
Read a few pages...it did not hold my interest.