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eBook 4.50 From Paddington (Miss Marple) download

by Agatha Christie

eBook 4.50 From Paddington (Miss Marple) download ISBN: 0001056042
Author: Agatha Christie
Publisher: Harpercollins Pub Ltd; Abridged edition (December 31, 1999)
Language: English
ePub: 1191 kb
Fb2: 1388 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: txt azw rtf doc
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

4:50 From Paddington, . 2. Part of Miss Marple series by Agatha Christie

4:50 From Paddington, . Part of Miss Marple series by Agatha Christie. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23. Miss Marple dropped her handbag and Bryan politely picked it up. At the same moment Mrs. McGillicuddy approached Emma and murmured, in an anguished voice-the anguish was quite genuine since Mrs. McGillicuddy deeply disliked the task which she was now performing: I wonder-could I go upstairs for a moment?

50 from Paddington is a detective fiction novel by Agatha Christie, first published in November 1957 by Collins Crime Club. This work was published in the United States at the same time as What Mrs McGillicuddy Saw!, by Dodd, Mead

50 from Paddington is a detective fiction novel by Agatha Christie, first published in November 1957 by Collins Crime Club. This work was published in the United States at the same time as What Mrs McGillicuddy Saw!, by Dodd, Mead. The novel was published in serial form before the book was released in each nation, and under different titles.

Miss Marple did indeed call attention to some new and rare species she had acquired for her rock-garden but did so in an almost absentminded manner.

Chapter 1. Mrs. McGillicuddy panted along the platform in the wake of the porter carrying her suitcase. Miss Marple did indeed call attention to some new and rare species she had acquired for her rock-garden but did so in an almost absentminded manner. And Mrs. McGillicuddy did not, as was customary, counter-attack with a list of her own recent acquisitions. The garden is not looking at all as it should," said Miss Marple, but still speaking absentmindedly.

50 from Paddington is a detective fiction novel by Agatha Christie, first published in November 1957. The 1961 film Murder, She Said was based on it. Elspeth McGillicuddy, an old friend of Jane Marple, comes to meet Jane from Scotland. While travelling by train, Elspeth sees a murder occurring in a train on a parallel track.

Agatha Christie 4:50 from Paddington A Miss Marple Mystery Contents Cover Title Page Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four . Other Books by Agatha Christie.

Agatha Christie 4:50 from Paddington A Miss Marple Mystery Contents Cover Title Page Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five. One. McGillicuddy was short and stout, the porter was tall and free-striding.

Miss Marple investigates the wealthy Crackenthorpe clan, believing . Agatha Christie - The Best. A friend of Miss Marple, Mrs Elspeth McGillicuddy, is traveling down to meet Miss Marple on the . 0 from Paddington.

Miss Marple investigates the wealthy Crackenthorpe clan, believing a body to be hidden on their estate after a visiting friend witnesses a brutal strangling murder occurring on a passing train. a list of 40 titles created 08 Sep 2016. That Spinster from St. Mary Mead. a list of 38 titles created 22 Sep 2014. Collections: Agatha Christie. On the way she witnesses a murder when her train draws alongside another train briefly traveling in the same direction. Mrs McGillicuddy reports her sighting to the Railway Police but no body is found.

In Agatha Christie’s classic mystery 4:50 From Paddington. In this book, the plot is driven by the fact that Miss Marple KNOWS that her friend Elspeth McGillicuddy is a woman with honesty, common sense, and NO imagination

In Agatha Christie’s classic mystery 4:50 From Paddington. In this book, the plot is driven by the fact that Miss Marple KNOWS that her friend Elspeth McGillicuddy is a woman with honesty, common sense, and NO imagination. Thus while everyone else dismisses Mrs. McGillicuddy's story of having witnessed a murder, Miss Marple simply starts figuring out how and where the body was disposed of and then goes looking for it.

4 Miss Marple knows Mrs McGillicuddy is a sensible woman with no imagination, so believes that she saw exactly what she claims.

50 from Paddington is a detective fiction novel by Agatha Christie, first published in November 1957 by Collins Crime Club. Miss Marple knows Mrs McGillicuddy is a sensible woman with no imagination, so believes that she saw exactly what she claims. Feeling too old and unfit to snoop around herself, Miss Marple asks Lucy Eyelesbarrow to hunt for the body and so Lucy takes a job at Rutherford Hall.

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Comments: (7)
zzzachibis
Poor Dame Agatha! When she started writing her mysteries in the 1920's she had no idea that she would still be cranking them out fifty years later. If she had, she wouldn't have made her two detectives (Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple) so old to start with. On the other hand, she got to explore the advantages and disadvantages of old age in a way not often found in mystery novels.

Although I like Hercule, I must admit that I prefer Christie books and stories that feature that gentle-but-shrewd old lady Miss Jane Marple. I think that they are more autobiographical since Christie was an old style English gentlewoman herself and since she spent a great deal of time as a child with her beloved "Grannie-Auntie." Her observations of this grandparent and her many old lady friends gave the author a deep insight into the wide knowledge of human nature that even an apparently sheltered woman acquires over a long life of dealing with family, friends, servants, and "tradesmen." Those who have the luxury of TIME may see things overlooked by those who are busy with careers and young families.

In this book, the plot is driven by the fact that Miss Marple KNOWS that her friend Elspeth McGillicuddy is a woman with honesty, common sense, and NO imagination. Thus while everyone else dismisses Mrs. McGillicuddy's story of having witnessed a murder, Miss Marple simply starts figuring out how and where the body was disposed of and then goes looking for it. But by this time (mid-1950's) Jane Marple is a very old lady indeed and needs help in the physical task of snooping around.

Enter the fascinating character of Lucy Eyelesbarrow, a brilliant young University graduate who deserts her academic field (mathematics) to take up the less prestigious, but more varied and more lucrative field of domestic engineering. For a very large sum, she will move into your house and do anything that needs to be done. She cooks, cleans, cares for children and elderly, and generally takes the burden of day-to-day living completely off your shoulders. There is no woman in the world who wouldn't LOVE to have a Lucy Eyelesbarrow around. However, she only takes temporary assignments and she doesn't come cheap. All Miss Marple has to do is arrange for Lucy to be employed at the estate where she suspects the missing body is hidden and the ultra-efficient domestic diva takes it from there.

I'm sure that Dame Agatha enjoyed creating Lucy. She liked studying mathematics herself and once said that she thought she would have been a good math teacher if she hadn't gotten married and become a writer. I also think that the two delightful teen-aged boys who play a pivotal role in the mystery were probably modeled after her beloved grandson Mathew and his friends.

It's a fine, well-plotted story with lots of off-beat characters and it kept me guessing until the end. If you want to commit murder, make damned certain Miss Marple doesn't get wind of it!
Mora
I'm officially rating Agatha Christie's "4:50 from Paddington: A Miss Marple Mystery (Miss Marple Mysteries Book 8)" at a Very Good 4 stars out of 5. But, purely because of the ending, I'd like to rate it a half a star lower (3-1/2 stars). For the most part, the book is very well written and interesting. I also enjoyed Miss Marple using Lucy Eyelesbarrow as a surrogate through most of the book. But, once again, Christie waits until the very last chapter of the book to have Miss Marple just pull the answer out of her bonnet and reveal new information. In this case, the reveal is almost within reason. So, that's why I'm docking the book only a half star instead of more. But, Christie's tendency to just string us, the readers, along and reveal something new at the end doesn't make for the best mysteries. Again, it's a good book. But, it could have been better.
Zyniam
This is an excellent mystery story. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and was mystified throughout the book until the last chapter. The characters were very interesting and well described and anyone of them at various times could have been guilty. An very exciting mystery.
Ishnsius
I forget about Agatha Christie's books and when I read one I remember why they are still being read today. They are good! This is one of Miss Marple's books. Her friend has seen a murder on a train but no one believes her. It is up to Miss Marple to find the body and the murderer.

I enjoyed this book. I tried to figure it out but was wrong on the culprit. I liked how different people were purposed as the culprit, each with a motive. The story moves rapidly. I liked Alexander and the women in the book. The men left much to be desired. The plot was believable.

I will be reading more by Agatha Christie.
Grinin
Instead of taking the night train to Memphis the elderly Mrs McGillicuddy took the 450 from Paddington. Suddenly a train running parallel to her train reveals a murder in progress! A dark headed man is strangling to death a woman. Mrs M. returns home to report the foul deed to the local constables. She then tells the tale to Miss Marple the greatest old lady in all of English murder fiction. The story revolves around the dark secrets of a large old English family the Crackenthorpes who live at Rutherfurd Hall. Among the members of the family are":
Old Mr Cracenthorpe a sour man who hates his sons and doesn t want them to reap the material benefits which would accrue to them in his will.
Harold-The son who is a prosperous businessman in London
Alfred-The black sheep of the family who has been involved in petty crime.
Cedrick-An artist who lives abroad but has come home to visit.
Miss Marple puts her amateur sleuthing niece Lucy Eyelesbarrow to work doing domestic chores for the family. Lucy discovers the corpse of the murdered woman in an old barn on the estate.
Dr. Quimper is the local physician who hankers for Emma ';s hand. She is the only sister of the three living Crackenthorpe sons.
Bryan Eastley is the widower of the other Crackenthorpe daughter who has died. His young son is Alexander.
The plot is clear and Christie keeps the number of characters small enough to stay clear in the mind of the reader. This novel features a great
ending as Miss Marple solves the crime. A good read for a stormy night or to peruse during a vacation. Christie wrote the novel in 1957.