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by Per Wahloo,Tom Weiner,Maj Sjowall

eBook Cop Killer (A Martin Beck Police Mystery) (Library Edition) download ISBN: 1433263157
Author: Per Wahloo,Tom Weiner,Maj Sjowall
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.; Unabridged LIBRARY edition (July 13, 2010)
Language: English
ePub: 1529 kb
Fb2: 1242 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: doc lrf rtf mobi
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo stated that McBain's work was an inspiration and model for their Martin Beck . Cop Killer focuses on the working relationship between Martin Beck and Sten Lennart Kollberg, his most trusted colleague.

Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo stated that McBain's work was an inspiration and model for their Martin Beck series, so was this title an homage to McBain? Whether it was or not, Sjowall/Wahloo's writing style continues to owe much to that established by McBain in his police procedurals. The writing is spare and straightforward, although the series does allow for considerable character development. Together they go to the village of Anderslolv in southern Sweden to investigate the disappearance of a woman.

Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo stated that McBain's work was an inspiration and model for their Martin Beck .

Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo stated that McBain's work was an inspiration and model for their Martin Beck series, so. .

Martin Beck, a police inspector in Stockholm, Sweden. The Man Who Went Up in Smoke. Roseanna (Martin Beck, The Man Who Went Up in Smoke (Martin Beck, The Man on the Balcony. The masterful first novel in the Martin Bec. ore. The masterful second novel in the Martin Bec.

Cop Killer: A Martin Beck Police Mystery. From the Martin Beck series by Sjowall and Wahloo, and one of the best of those books. This has a "cops gone bad" underpinning, but also terrific, realistic characters and gut-wrenching story line. Protagonist Martin Beck leads an investigation into the violent murder of a retired senior policeman which gradually uncovers 40 years of a one-man reign of terror. Many of the conventions of crime fiction have their roots in this seminal series.

Widely recognised as the greatest masterpieces of crime fiction ever written, these are the original detective stories that pioneered the detective genre. Written in the 1960s, they are the work of Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo – a husband and wife team from Sweden. The ten novels follow the fortunes of the detective Martin Beck, whose enigmatic, taciturn character has inspired countless other policemen in crime fiction. Maj Sjowall is an important writer for any mystery addict. It's my understanding that his police procedurals helped to set the stage for the popularity of that form. The Man on the Balcony: A Martin Beck Police Mystery. Historically, the novels are set in Sweden in the 60s at a time when that country was beginning to undergo dramatic socioeconomic changes.

The shocking ninth novel in the Martin Beck mystery series by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö finds Beck investigating parallel cases that have shocked a small rural community. In a country town, a woman is brutally murdered and left buried in a swamp. There are two main suspects: her closest neighbor and her ex-husband.

The incredible fourth novel in the Martin Beck mystery series by the internationally renowned crime writing duo Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö, finds Martin Beck heading a major manhunt in pursuit of a mass-murderer. With a new introduction by Jonathan Franzen: "I've read The Laughing Policeman six or eight times. The incredible fourth novel in the Martin Beck mystery series by the internationally renowned crime writing duo Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö, finds Martin Beck heading a major manhunt in pursuit of a mass-murderer.

This is Book 4 of the 10 mysteries featuring Martin Beck written by Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo between 1965 and 1975. Set in Sweden and identifying the changes taking place in Swedish society,they were the forerunners of police procedural novels and inspired a whole generation of writers. A mass killing in Stockholm set in the late 60's including a policeman sets up the plot for a team of detectives to solve before the public gets very uneasy.

[Library Edition Audiobook CD in Vinyl case.][Read by Tom Weiner] In the penultimate installment of this masterful crime-fiction series, Martin Beck, now head of the National Murder Squad, is called in to a sleepy part of the countryside to investigate a woman's disappearance. What Beck doesn't know is that the woman has already been murdered, her body dumped in a swamp. At the same time, a midnight shoot-out between three cops and two teenage boys ends with one policeman dead. As Beck and his partner, Lennart Kollberg, investigate both cases, they encounter two figures from their earlier cases. Folke Bengtsson, the convicted killer from the first novel of the series (Roseanna), has been recently released. Since that murder shared many characteristics with Beck's present case, Beck comes under pressure to arrest Bengtsson. But Beck has begun to doubt that Bengtsson was guilty of any murder at all. The media swarms over the little town and among the journalists is the man who was convicted of murder in the second novel of the series (The Man Who Went Up In Smoke). The presence of these two killers, one who may not be guilty at all and another who killed by accident, raises a theme from previous books: there are different kinds of murder and different kinds of guilt. The fugitive ''cop killer'' will accidentally provide the solution to Martin Beck's murder case but that's not really important. What matters is the juxtaposition of the sleepy countryside with the violent city and the tension between the ever decreasing number of capable police officers and the growing number of incompetent or corrupt ones.
Comments: (7)
Sagda
If anything, the authors not only continue the high tradition of the previous novels in the series, but advance their quality even more with this, their 9th entry in the Martin Beck police novels. a lot is happening in this novel: a woman is murdered on page 1 and her body hidden in a location where it seems probable it could remain hidden for years; later, of course, it is discovered by some hikers. Her neighbor is the man who strangled Rosanna in the first novel. He has done his time and been released, yet the condition of the body recalls some of the elements of the earlier murder, and her personality is in accord with the psychological profile of the murderer and his disapproval of "loose women." The bumbling criminals who kill a policeman and give the title to the book appear later. Martin Beck, now an eminent man who thinks he might be promoted to a desk job against his will, lends his expertise and legendary skepticism to both investigations, and ultimately reaches a satisfying conclusion.
The authors have evidently thought better of their lapse in No. 8 of the series, where they indulge themselves in a mercifully short harangue on the politics of justice which is simply denied and made to look foolish by the action of the book. In this book, they let the plot tell the story, with the characters doing their best with the situations they find themselves in, on both sides of the law. We can sympathize with some of the criminals who are trapped in a culture where being not too bright is a crippling disadvantage, but still wish for them to be caught and punished.
FailCrew
I can't help noting the similarity in titles between this book and the first of the Ed McBain books that I read earlier this month. McBain's book was Cop Hater. Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo stated that McBain's work was an inspiration and model for their Martin Beck series, so was this title an homage to McBain?

Whether it was or not, Sjowall/Wahloo's writing style continues to owe much to that established by McBain in his police procedurals. The writing is spare and straightforward, although the series does allow for considerable character development. We've gotten to know Martin Beck and the members of his team very well in the course of these books.

The books have gotten progressively better as the series has continued, in my opinion, and I have to say that this one, the penultimate entry, is my favorite so far.

Cop Killer focuses on the working relationship between Martin Beck and Sten Lennart Kollberg, his most trusted colleague. Together they go to the village of Anderslolv in southern Sweden to investigate the disappearance of a woman. A few days into the investigation the woman's body is found in an out-of-the-way location near a lake. She has been murdered, so now the two have a murder case on their hands. They are aided in the investigation by a local policeman, Herrgott Allwright, who seems to know everything about everyone in the small village.

Suspicion immediately falls on the woman's next door neighbor who turns out to be the culprit who was apprehended by Beck and his team in the first novel, Roseanna. The man had been released from prison and was trying to make a new life for himself in Anderslolv.

Beck's superiors insist that the neighbor be arrested and Beck and Kollberg reluctantly comply although neither really believes the man is guilty and they continue investigating.

Meanwhile, in another part of the country, two inept young criminals have burgled an unoccupied summer cottage and taken everything that wasn't nailed down. In their escape, they drive without turning on their headlights which gets the attention of a police patrol and they are stopped by the infamous Karl Kristiansson and his new partner (His first one was killed in The Abominable Man.) Kenneth Kvastmo, who is just as inept as his old partner but is much more zealous in the pursuit of criminals. It is Kvastmo who insists on pursuing and stopping the car and he emerges from the police vehicle with his gun drawn. Before the encounter ends, two policeman are shot and another is injured in a very weird way and one of the young criminals is dead. The other one escapes and later ditches his car and steals another one. As serendipity would have it, that car turns out to be connected to Beck's murder case!

It all turns into a typical horrible mess, again exemplifying the ineptitude of the Swedish police system. As always in these books, Sjowall/Wahloo are very critical of the brutality and excesses of the police which they see as an outgrowth of failings of the Swedish welfare state of the period. All of this is portrayed in a very sardonic way in their prose. They use humor very effectively to make their points and often the reader can't help chuckling over some of the Inspector Clouseau-like episodes.

At the same time, individual policemen like Beck and Kollberg and several of their colleagues - Gunvald Larsson, Fredrik Melander, Per Mansson, etc. - are shown as dedicated and hard-working, if flawed, professionals who doggedly pursue their investigations of criminality, even in the face of bureaucratic indifference or ignorance.

On a lighter note, we finally see Martin Beck in a satisfying romantic relationship after so many years in a very unfulfilling marriage that ended in divorce. Rhea Nielsen, a woman that he met in the last novel, has become his lover and for the first time since we've know him, he actually seems happy! But will it last?

Only one more book to go in the series. I miss Martin Beck already and he's not even gone.
Tholmeena
Another highly entertaining crime novel from the Swedish writers Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo. "Cop Killer" has a challenging plot, with three stories interlinked; some extremely well-drawn characters, not the least of which are the illustrious Martin Beck, his long-time partner, Lennart Kollberg and the slightly outrageous, Gunvald Larsson, and a few surprises sprinkled throughout the story. As is the case with many of the books in this series, the authors express some strong feelings about the problems of the Swedish welfare state (circa 1979 in this case) and some sharp-edged criticism of the country's criminal justice system. For a crime novel with a cop protagonist who had reached the status of international icon at the time this book came out, there is surprisingly harsh commentary about the quality of Swedish policemen and their alleged lack of commitment to their work. Sjowall and Wahloo also use the book to examine the question of guns and their use by police. Their views on the matter--voiced by a couple of cop characters in the book--would be controversial in a lot of societies, certainly in ours here in the U.S.

Despite the fact that this is a murder story with other serious crimes and misdemeanors tossed in and the writers are liberal with their criticism of the Swedish state throughout, Sjowall and Wahloo manage to keep the tale light-hearted and funny from beginning to end. This is done largely through their really brilliant character sketches, but they are also well-connected with the absurdities of life and skilled at threading a good dose of that element throughout the book.

I'm not getting into the details of the plot--others have already done that with some skill. I can add that "Cop Killer" surprisingly brings three different crimes together in a perfectly plausible and entertaining way. This is a really good read and does justice to the whole series. Highly recommended.