carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » A Window in Copacabana: An Inspector Espinosa Mystery (Inspector Espinosa Mysteries)

eBook A Window in Copacabana: An Inspector Espinosa Mystery (Inspector Espinosa Mysteries) download

by Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza

eBook A Window in Copacabana: An Inspector Espinosa Mystery (Inspector Espinosa Mysteries) download ISBN: 0805074384
Author: Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.; 1st edition (January 10, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1307 kb
Fb2: 1677 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: docx lrf rtf azw
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

Uma Janela Em Copacabana (Inspector Espinosa - Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza Cia das Letras, 2001 .

Uma Janela Em Copacabana (Inspector Espinosa - Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza Cia das Letras, 2001, 218 páginas Lido de 15/02/17 a 16/02/17 Nota 4 em 5. SINOPSE. Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro. I originally chose to read this book to get a taste of Brazil, and I did notice a lot of comparisons between law enforcement in Rio versus America.

Series Title: Inspector Espinosa Mysteries. Nothing is quite as it first appears as Espinosa finds himself in his old haunts of Leme and Copacabana, and in the all-too-familiar terrain of corruption, greed, and fear

Series Title: Inspector Espinosa Mysteries. Publisher: Picador USA. Book theme: Police Procedural. Author: Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza. Street Date: January 24, 2006. Nothing is quite as it first appears as Espinosa finds himself in his old haunts of Leme and Copacabana, and in the all-too-familiar terrain of corruption, greed, and fear. If the item details above aren’t accurate or complete, we want to know about it. Report incorrect product info.

Nothing is quite as it first appears as Espinosa finds himself in his old haunts of Leme and Copacabana, and in the all-too-familiar murky terrain of corruption, secret lives, greed, and fear.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Nothing is quite as it first appears as Espinosa finds himself in his old haunts of Leme and Copacabana, and in the all-too-familiar murky terrain of corruption, secret lives, greed, and fear. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

A distinguished academic, Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza is a bestselling novelist who lives in Rio de Janeiro. A Window in Copacabana is the fourth book in the series; the fifth, Pursuit, was published in winter 2006. Garcia-Roza lives in Brazil.

Inspector Espinosa takes on another investigation A good fun read, the fourth book in this author’s series of Inspector Espinosa mysteries. The story is set in Rio de Janeiro and translated from the Portuguese.

Inspector Espinosa takes on another investigation. His fellow cops are being murdered and there seems to be no obvious explanation nor connection. But hang in there, Espinosa is a tough and cleaver detective and figures it all out in the end, but with plenty of surprises along the way. Again, this series of stories by Garcia-Roza is an entertaining offering and readers will not be disappointed. A good fun read, the fourth book in this author’s series of Inspector Espinosa mysteries. Someone is killing cops – shooting them at point blank range.

A Window in Copacabana. Inspector Espinosa Mysteries (Volume 4) Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza Picador. Three policemen have been killed over the course of a few days

A Window in Copacabana.

Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza. An elderly lady approaches the front desk at the Twelfth Precinct in Copacabana and demands to speak with the chief. Inspector Espinosa unwittingly ignites the obsessions of a menacing misanthrope in the latest from the highly acclaimed mystery author. Tired after a long day, she leaves without further explanation, promising to return.

by Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza & translated by Benjamin Moser . Inspector Espinosa, the imperturbable maverick of Rio de Janeiro’s 12th Precinct, matches wits with a serial killer whose path seems to be equally fortuitous. The second murdered Rio cop could be just a coincidence. But the third, also shot in the neck, establishes a definite pattern, though it’s a zigzag pattern. Garcia-Roza, who writes like nobody else in the world, has produced altogether the most ebullient and delightful tale of serial homicide you’ll read this year. Pub Date: Jan. 10th, 2005. Inspector Espinosa Series. by Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza. 1. At the end of the afternoon, the big digital clock on the corner announced that it was one hundred degrees.

A ruthless group of corrupt cops is playing a lethal game of cat and mouse in the latest installment in the seductive bestselling Brazilian crime series Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro. Three policemen have been killed over the course of a few days. They were mediocre cops, and their deaths have a lot in common: they were eliminated by a cold-blooded assassin, who leaves no trace and likes to fire at point-blank range. Immediately the police world is thrown into turmoil. Who would risk running around the city killing cops, even unpopular ones? People involved in drug trafficking? Other policemen? Espinosa, chief of the 12th Precinct, doesn't have much to go on. And when the body of a woman connected to one of the dead cops is found on the sidewalk below her apartment window, things get even more complicated, as a reputed "witness"-the wife of a high-ranking government official--becomes obsessed with the case, and with Espinosa. Nothing is quite as it first appears as Espinosa finds himself in his old haunts of Leme and Copacabana, and in the all-too-familiar murky terrain of corruption, secret lives, greed, and fear.
Comments: (7)
Fog
This is a very clever mystery. But the real charm of the book is the exquisitely nuanced writing - and the endearing character of the detective, Inspector Espinoza.

Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza spent most of his career writing theoretical essays and books on philosophy and psychology. Perhaps this is why his novels have such a rare mental atmosphere.

The psychology of his characters is complex. This author is clearly at home with moral ambiguities and unanswerable questions. Crime is not portrayed as an aberration but as part of the peculiar psychology of the human race.

In other words, Garcia-Roza is writing genuine literature, as well as absorbing crime fiction.

The plot of this book is steeped in paranoia. Three cops are murdered. They were probably on the take, and this terrifies all the other cops on the Force who are on the take. A woman who thinks she saw the murderer from the window of her apartment is also terrified that she'll be silenced by the killer. Espinosa is forced to conduct a secret investigation, since he's investigating his own people.

Espinosa is obsessed with three beautiful women in this novel. He doesn't sleep with all three. He's a middle-aged man with bookish tastes, not a super-hero or a super-stud. But they fill his thoughts and influence his actions.

We get a very intimate view of what daily life is like for Espinosa. We sympathize with his attachment to his malfunctioning toaster. We follow his eyes when they rest upon the slit skirt of a attractive woman. We feel his sweaty shirt in the hundred-degree heat. He is easily sidetracked from the office and easily seduced by the wrong women - and we don't mind. Garcia-Roza has a subtle and irresistible subtle sense of humor.

I love these books. A Window in Copenhagen is especially deep and delicious.
Rainbearer
"A Window in Copacabana" starts off with six murders that are to give Rio's top cop, Inspector Espinosa, a run for his money and a few sleepless nights. Three of the victims are unexceptional Rio cops and the other three are women that they were involved with. The motivation for the killings and their possible connections are unclear and Espinosa's painstaking investigation is slow to turn up answers. Meanwhile, the Inspector finds himself with three women in his life--two more than he wants, but all three impossible to dispose of for various good reasons. Eventually, someone else intervenes and at least one of the harem is pushed out of a high-rise window--replicating one of the earlier murders.

This early Espinosa crime novel is as entertaining as its successors in most respects, but most especially because of author Luiz Alfredo Garcia-Roza's knack for interesting narrative about life in Rio de Janeiro and Brazilian cops and Cariocas living on the edge. Garcia-Roza has a clean writing style reminiscent of the best American noir crime writers and he is well-served by a gifted translator.

This is a fun read and highly recommended.
Tolrajas
As usual, shipping and delivery condition were excellent. I absolutely love the characters and how real they are presented, as human beings. I think the writing helps one learn about the country and the people living there...along with the culture. A good light-hearted read (though, it's not a book that my mother might tolerate as some of the scenes and implications are a tad too read for her 91 years).
Umge
I enjoy all of Garcia-Roza's books. Unfortunately. I have read them all now. I relate to the main character, Inspector Espinosa.
net rider
Inspector Espinoza is a fascinating policeman - intelligent, thorough, and extremely interesting. Book is very well written. I am currently reading my way through the entire series.
MEGA FREEDY
Inspector Espinosa takes on another investigation. His fellow cops are being murdered and there seems to be no obvious explanation nor connection. But hang in there, Espinosa is a tough and cleaver detective and figures it all out in the end, but with plenty of surprises along the way. Again, this series of stories by Garcia-Roza is an entertaining offering and readers will not be disappointed. It is enough like classic cop fiction to be familiar; but it also is strange enough to introduce the reader to Brazilian culture and climate. Enjoy!
Kiaile
A good fun read, the fourth book in this author’s series of Inspector Espinosa mysteries. The story is set in Rio de Janeiro and translated from the Portuguese.

Someone is killing cops – shooting them at point blank range. Three have been killed and now the girlfriends of the three are being killed off one by one. The murdered policemen all led remarkably similar lives: they lived “above their pay grade;” they were all married but had separate apartments where they kept or met with their women friends.

The inspector is divorced, has one kid, and he has an active love life. He also gets involved with one of the women involved in the case and he gets his regular woman friend to help out a victim in the investigation. Naturally, we have a surprise twist at the end and we didn’t suspect who the murderer is.

There’s good writing – here are some passages I liked:

“Air conditioning placed a city in parentheses: it might as well be Paris or New York as Rio de Janeiro.”

“Serial killers are American. We don’t have those in our culture.”

“…we’re just not going to tell the press everything. If they ask, tell them someone killed a prostitute. They’ll lose interest immediately.”

“Sir, it’s almost impossible to report everyone on the take. They just think it’s part of their pay.” Police corruption is a major theme in the story.

There’s a lot of local color of Rio with most of the action set between downtown and the Copacabana beach. I liked the fact that the author mentions actual streets. I like to look at them in google maps and I click the “little yellow map guy” that gives you a walking view of the neighborhoods.

The title and part of the plot are a bit of a take-off on “Rear Window” by Alfred Hitchcock.