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eBook The Big Fix (A Moses Wine Mystery) download

by Roger L. Simon

eBook The Big Fix (A Moses Wine Mystery) download ISBN: 0671039067
Author: Roger L. Simon
Publisher: I Books Inc.; New edition edition (March 1, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 180
ePub: 1266 kb
Fb2: 1883 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi txt docx lit
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

Moses Wine thought he had put his interest in politics far behind him when he became a Los Angeles-based private detective.

Moses Wine thought he had put his interest in politics far behind him when he became a Los Angeles-based private detective. Sure, he'd once been an activist, but that had been during the Sixties or so it seemed, before Lila Shea showed up on his doorstep. had they remained together after their Moses Wine thought he had put his interest in politics far behind him when he became a Los Angeles-based private detective.

Apparently, author Roger L. Simon was trying to update the classic Phillp Marlowe type . story to the hip and strange place that Southern California (especially the criminal underworld) had become by the early 1970s. The Big Fix" has a very strong sense of place and time, and today reads like a snapshot of that very confused era. However, as a mystery, the plot is fairly pedestrian.

Big Fix. Roger l. simon. Director's Cut" is the latest mystery novel starring the wise-cracking LA-detective Moses Wine, a private hack who cut his cultural teeth during the 1960s. if you know what I mean. but this book contains more than a few surprises, and I don't mean the "mystery novel" kind. It starts off with a bang in Chapter One, speaking favorably of John Ashcroft, and unfavorably of Louis Freeh.

Roger L. Simon (screenplay), Roger L. Simon (novel). In Los Angeles, Moses Wine, who was part of the counter-culture of the late 1960s at UC-Berkeley, still has those radical feelings but no longer does anything about them. His wife Suzanne, who has transformed from a 1960s hippie to a 1970s new-ageist, divorced him when his law school background didn't materialize into the upper middle class liberal life she was expecting, she having sole custody of their two young sons, with Moses having visitation rights.

Six weeks later, Simon had finished the first Moses Wine novel, "The Big Fi. At the time, Simon was living in Echo Park, California, where many of the stories in the Moses Wine series take place.

Moses Wine thought he had put his interest in politics far behind him when he became a private detective, until he meets the politically-minded Lila again. The Senator asks for his help in a smear campaign against him, but then Lila turns up dead and politics are the last thing on Moses' mind.

The complete series list for - A Moses Wine Mystery Roger L. Simon Series List. A Moses Wine Mystery. Series List:9 titles. Genre: All Private Investigator Hard-Boiled Suspense.

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Moses Wine, for example, is an unreconstructed 1960s radical who, in the 1970s, has gone into the private gumshoe . A neat premise, because it allows The Big Fix to solve its case while at the same time exploring the ways we've changed in the last decade.

Moses Wine, for example, is an unreconstructed 1960s radical who, in the 1970s, has gone into the private gumshoe game because it's one way to keep his integrity. His wife has left him because he refuses to become a lawyer. She's moved in with a trainer for an est-like outfit. The Eppis character (unashamedly modeled on Abbie Hoffman) provides Wine's connection with the past. His investigation leads into the craziness of everyday Southern Californian life styles.

Introduction by Academy Award winning actor Richard Dreyfuss, who portrayed Moses Wine in the acclaimed screen adaptation of 'The Big Fix.'With a new afterword by Roger L. Simon. Who Killed the Sixties-Or Was it a Suicide? Moses Wine thought he had put his interest in politics far behind him when he became a Los Angeles-based private detective.Sure, he'd once been an activist, but that had been during the Sixties.A lifetime ago?or so it seemed, before Lila Shea showed up on his doorstep.Lila was a woman who could have been the love of his life?had they remained together after their last night of passion in 1967.Nevertheless, she's back, and her political views are as strong as they were when Moses last saw her. Before he knows it, Moses finds himself at the campaign headquarters of Senator Miles Hawthorne. .The job Hawthorne offers seems simple: Locate Howard Eppis, chairman of the Free Amerika Party, and convince him to end the smear campaign he's been waging against the senator during his bid for presidency. But then Lila turns up dead, and suddenly politics are the last thing on Moses' mind?...You can share your thoughts about Roger Simon's The Big Fix in the new ibooks virtual readers' group at www.ibooksinc.com.
Comments: (7)
Defolosk
It should not have been such a surprise. A murder mystery I’d found hilarious shortly after its publication in 1973 left me cold in 2016. The Big Fix was the first of seven novels in Roger L. Simon‘s series featuring private eye Moses Wine. Set in L.A. in 1972, the book was a nonstop celebration of the drug-addled culture of the 1960s. I should have left it behind with pretty much everything else in that era. History looks better in hindsight.

The plot at the core of the book is strong. The story is full of suspense, and it holds up well as a murder mystery. It’s likely to keep any reader guessing until the book’s final chapters. But the fixation on sex, drugs, and rock ‘n roll gets in the way.

Moses Wine is broke. Even though he has little respect for mainstream politics and a long history of radical activism, Moses finds it impossible to turn down an assignment from the Presidential primary campaign of a Democrat whose policies closely resemble those of George McGovern. Senator Miles Hawthorne is on the cusp of gaining the Democratic nomination for President when flyers start appearing in Los Angeles associating him with a notorious radical. The flyer claims that Howard Eppis, chairman of the Free Amerika Party and author of Rip It Off, has not just endorsed Hawthorne but that his election will result in converting the country into a Communist state. (Eppis, of course, is a stand-in for the Yippie activist Abbie Hoffman, author of Steal This Book! It turns out, as we learn in an author’s note at the end, that Simon knew Hoffman.) Moses’ assignment is to track down Eppis and stop him from sabotaging the Hawthorne campaign.

The complicated story that follows involves Moses’ old girlfriend from Berkeley, a multimillionaire music producer, and the cast of a radical Chicano acting troupe. (The latter could only be, faintly disguised, the then-famous Teatro Campesino that figured prominently in organizing farmworkers in California.) For anyone who lived through that time as an adult, there are rewards to be found in The Big Fix. But the book conjured up more bad memories than good ones for me.
Arcanescar
I bought this book because I saw it among a list of the 100 best detective stories. I knew nothing about the author or the subject. I read this book straight through in just a few hours. The writing flows very easily. His casually tossed off descriptions of place and setting are terrific. I'm not entirely in the camp of the perspective of the main character, he's a liberal while I'm a libertarian but there's a lot of overlap. The story could be enjoyed by anyone other than a diehard opposite of Moses Wine, though, because the perspective isn't put across obnoxiously. I'd really like to have given this book four and a half stars. My only reservation was that some aspects of the plot didn't quite work for me. It was still a very entertaining read and one I'd recommend to anyone.
Faegal
I was attracted to this book by fond memories of the movie. The same author wrote both the book and subsequent screenplay, but the two are definitely different. A different Moses Wine chases different bad guys down different mean streets of LA. The book is a good read just the same.

This book was scanned and no one has bothered to edit it, so you have to correct the misspelled words as you read it, which seems pretty shabby treatment for the author, the work and the reader, especially since Amazon is charging ten bucks for the download.
Unh
Always have enjoyed the movie - wish it would make it to dvd!!!! Curious to see how the stories are.
Agalas
The protagonist is an ex SDS detective of the new left, who cheated on his ex-wife but can't stand it that she is doing the same thing with a guru.They have two kids together who are shown to us. Other characters include Moses' Old Left Aunt Sonia, a thinly disguised Abby Hoffman -or was he Jerry Rubin; some twisted rich people, satanism, and Chicano political theater, all set in California of the 1970s. A rich brew, full of period detail up and and down the class spectrum and a page turner.
Grillador
I should start by saying that am a huge fan of Private Investigator fiction and that this was my first Moses Wine novel. Apparently, author Roger L. Simon was trying to update the classic Phillp Marlowe type P.I. story to the hip and strange place that Southern California (especially the criminal underworld) had become by the early 1970s. "The Big Fix" has a very strong sense of place and time, and today reads like a snapshot of that very confused era. However, as a mystery, the plot is fairly pedestrian. Set on the backdrop of a political campaign (though we never meet the candidate himself), one of Wine's ex-girlfriends is murdered shortly after bringing him a case. However, Wine doesn't seem particularly outraged and pursues the case with a curious detachment. Along the way he encounters a cornucopia of early 70s revolutionaries and hippies. Ultimately though, the climax is a disappointment not worthy of the story's buildup.
Simon has all the moves of a classic P.I. writer. Wine is appropriately cynical, hardedged and wise-cracking. What he needs is a truly Marlowe-esque plot to sink his teeth into.
artman
I'm not too familiar with mystery novels but this one was pretty good. I followed the overall plot but the details did get a bit convoluted. Perhaps a second read through would clear that up, but there's too many other books awaiting my attention. Overall I thought it was good and gave it four stars.
Roger Simon has a terrific sense of how our political identities are rooted in so much more (or less) than the depth or purity of our ideas. We identify with those who are the models for the kind of person we think we are, or the group to which we want to belong, and in the process we lose sight of our real political objectives, if we ever knew what they were in the first place. This book explores this dilemma for Moses Wine as he grapples with his own personal history of the sixties in investigating the murder of the woman who symbolizes both his love and politics at that time. Now he must ask again, what really motivates our search for truth? I won't impose my solution to this fascinating mystery.