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eBook The Black Path of Fear download

by Cornell Woolrich

eBook The Black Path of Fear download ISBN: 0345304888
Author: Cornell Woolrich
Publisher: Ballantine Books (July 12, 1982)
Language: English
ePub: 1564 kb
Fb2: 1748 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: rtf lrf docx mbr
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

Like much of Woolrich's work, Black Path of Fear deals with the destruction of love, the individual versus the system, and - of course - revenge. This book is one of Woolrich's famous "Black" series (possibly the series which helped to coin the term "noir")

Like much of Woolrich's work, Black Path of Fear deals with the destruction of love, the individual versus the system, and - of course - revenge. In this case, Bill Scott finds himself on the run from police and trying to prove his innocence after being framed for the murder of the woman he loved, the kept woman of a crime boss he worked for and stole her from. This book is one of Woolrich's famous "Black" series (possibly the series which helped to coin the term "noir"). A young man runs away with a gangster's wife to Cuba.

Cornell Woolrich writes these kind of innocent man on the run-type books very well, and either you're in or Suspense thriller about a woman . In the first few pages of Cornell Woolrich’s The Black Path of Fear, Eve is stabbed to death in a Cuban nightclub and the police blame Scott

Cornell Woolrich writes these kind of innocent man on the run-type books very well, and either you're in or Suspense thriller about a woman ending up with a knife in her back at some crowded nightclub. The guy has to run away from the Banana Republic police who are unimpeachably convinced he stabbed her to death. In the first few pages of Cornell Woolrich’s The Black Path of Fear, Eve is stabbed to death in a Cuban nightclub and the police blame Scott. We get the backstory of how Scott and Mrs. Roman got together in a long flashback, but the majority of the Bill Scott is honest, though obviously not the brightest guy in the world.

Those lines encompass the hot, sweaty fear that envelops Cornell Woolrich's The black path of fear. Bill "Scotty" Scott is an innocent guy, down on his luck. A stroke of fate puts him at the Miami doorstep of powerful, sadistic gangster Eddie Roman. Eddie offers Scotty a job as his chauffeur. But it’s love at first sight when Scotty meets Eve, Eddie’s beautiful, abused wife. The two lovers take the fast track to Havana, with a vengeful Eddie right behind them. Scotty and Eve stay on the run, constantly looking over their shoulders in fear

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The Black Path of Fear (1944) tells of a man who runs away to Havana with an American gangster's wife. There aren't many twists or surprises in Black Path of Fear, but that's not why one reads Woolrich; the focus of the story is on the main character's despair and loneliness, and how redemption, vengeance, or the occasional ally, do little to console those who have lost love.

Short fiction collections. The Chase (1946) (novel The Black Path of Fear). Fall Guy (1947) (story Cocaine). The Guilty (1947) (story He Looked Like Murder). Fear in the Night (1947) (story Nightmare). The Return of the Whistler (1948) (story All at Once, No Alice). I Wouldn’t Be in Your Shoes (1948) (story).

The Black Path of Fear. Works by or about Cornell Woolrich in libraries (WorldCat catalog). Cornell Woolrich Papers at the Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library, New York, NY. "Cornell Woolrich and the Tough-Man Tradition of American Crime Fiction" by Christine Photinos (Clues: A Journal of Detection 2., 2010). The melodrama star as a noir film heroine: The Trace of Some Lips (1952)" by Roberto Carlos Ortiz (article in Spanish about a Mexican adaptation of "Collared", by Cornell Woolrich).

The Black Path of Fear - Cornell Woolrich. Cornell Woolrich e a literatura policial LiteratusTV - Продолжительность: 9:18 LiteratusTV Recommended for you. 9:18. Luke Combs - Beer Never Broke My Heart (Audio) - Продолжительность: 3:09 Luke Combs Recommended for you.

Действие разворачивается в центре большого южно-американского города. Жители в панике - на волю из зоопарка вырвался ягуар.

Used availability for Cornell Woolrich's The Black Path of Fear. May 2016 : USA Hardback. July 1982 : USA Mass Market Paperback.

This book is one of Woolrich's famous "Black" series (possibly the series which helped to coin the term "noir").

Scotty flees to Havana to escape a woman's vengeful gangster husband, is framed for her murder, and trapped in an unfamiliar country
Comments: (6)
Survivors
Based on his original short story "Havana Night" (Flynn's Detective Magazine, December 1942), The Black Path of Fear is the fifth novel in Cornell Woolrich's Black Series. Like much of Woolrich's work, Black Path of Fear deals with the destruction of love, the individual versus the system, and - of course - revenge. In this case, Bill Scott finds himself on the run from police and trying to prove his innocence after being framed for the murder of the woman he loved, the kept woman of a crime boss he worked for and stole her from.

What sounds like a convoluted plot comes across straightforward, as do many of our hero's escapades, as he winds his way through the labyrinthine streets and underworld - from dark, narrow alleys to decrepit opium dens - of Havana. There aren't many twists or surprises in Black Path of Fear, but that's not why one reads Woolrich; the focus of the story is on the main character's despair and loneliness, and how redemption, vengeance, or the occasional ally, do little to console those who have lost love.

The Black Path of Fear is my favorite title in the Black Series, for while likely intended to describe a lone man's flight from injustice or pursuit of justice, it can also stand as a description of life itself, and how all people are loners struggling to hang on to that brief glimmer of light that the rest of the world seems determined to extinguish at any given chance.
Helldor
Scotty and Eve are in love. The problem is Eve's married to a vicious gangster who she hates. Scotty and Eve escape to Havana...but they're not safe. Eve is killed in a Havana bar and Scotty is framed for her murder. He's alone in a strange land with no friends and unjustly accused of murder. What to do?

The first part of the novel is great. Full of twists and turns and hair-raising escapes. However it bogs down seriously in the second half where Scotty is trapped in the villains lair. It gets confusing and ridiculously convoluted. It DOES recover at the end however. Still that section really slows it down. Still--worth getting. VERY short (under 200 pages).
Vichredag
Cornell Woolrich's THE BLACK PATH OF FEAR (1944) is excellent in some passages and in a few scenes, particularly in the early chapters, but overall this adventure with a "happy ending" is thoroughly unbelievable.

The "plot" involves a drug lord in Florida getting revenge on his wife and his wife's lover, a chauffeur known as Scotty, who run away together to Havana, Cuba ... and the wife's lover then seeking revenge on the drug lord. The style in the opening chapter is similar to "noir" films and American tough-guy novels of the 1930s and '40s (and even '50s). It is elsewhere often filled to the brim with lyrical descriptions, which add to the novel's sense of unreality.

As far as the course of events is concerned, incredible LUCK rules. Once the drug lord's wife has been murdered and Scotty has been iron-clad framed for her stabbing, Scotty almost miraculously escapes from the Cuban police, finds a preternaturally gifted female underworld helper with a heart of gold, and over and over and over and over has the totally implausible GOOD LUCK to get closer and closer to the truth and to his main goal: payback.

The only character in this novel who is enjoyable is the tough, ingenious, resourceful Cuban woman whom Scotty LUCKILY encounters while fleeing the police. She, among other things, is brilliant at disguises and possesses the ability of seeming to change her personality to fit any situation. Perhaps the finest example of her brilliance is when the Cuban police search her shabby bedroom for Scotty and fail to notice him there, hidden right in plain sight.

The whole adventure is narrated after the fact by Scotty himself. Insofar as he claims to be a simple, uneducated guy, his lengthy, often poetic descriptions and high-toned diction suggest that Woolrich got carried away while writing. And insofar as Scotty knows absolutely no Spanish, his ability to remember and quote the Spanish words and phrases of dozens of the Cubans around him--and CORRECTLY SPELL AND PUNCTUATE THAT SPANISH--is another incredible feat that suggests Woolrich either hadn't sorted out his manner of narration or assumed that readers would not notice or would not care about the inconsistencies.

In my judgment, the confrontation with the drug lord in Florida is poorly presented. And the final scenes back in Havana are just slightly better.

If I were giving this book a letter grade it would be a "D+" ... that high solely because the Cuban underworld woman is such an enjoyable gem.
Phobism
This book is one of Woolrich's famous "Black" series (possibly the series which helped to coin the term "noir").
A young man runs away with a gangster's wife to Cuba. When they are barely off the boat, the ganster has his wife murdered, and now the young man is left framed for the murder in a country where he has no friends and doesn't speak the language. This story is his struggle to clear himself while staying out of the hands of the authorities, find the real killer(s), and exact revenge.
While it starts out as a very promising noir thriller, Woolrich's pulp magazine writing roots show through, and the action turns into a "fast-action whiz-bang", with the story-line moving at breakneck speed through opium dens, Cuba, and the United States. Fortunately, Woolrich was very good at writing whiz-bangs, and much noir remains in the story. It is a shame, though, that the story has an almost schizophrenic nature.
It's an enjoyable stor! ! y, but not one of Woolrich's best. By all means read it, but try to find some of his better "black" novels, such as "Rendezvous in Black", or his William Irish novels, such as "Phantom Lady", too.