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eBook The Murderer Vine (Hard Case Crime) download

by Shepard Rifkin

eBook The Murderer Vine (Hard Case Crime) download ISBN: 0857683721
Author: Shepard Rifkin
Publisher: Hard Case Crime; Unabridged edition edition (April 26, 2011)
Language: English
ePub: 1692 kb
Fb2: 1419 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: rtf lit txt azw
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

A hard case crime book. to Joseph Barrett and Evelyn Farrell.

A hard case crime book. Published by. Titan Books. They continually strive to penetrate the leaf canopy and attain sunlight - one hundred and fifty feet above the perpetual twilight of the forest floor.

Shepard Rifkin's The Murderer Vine is number 43 of the Hard Case Crime series. This is another selection worthy of being in the Hard Case lineup. Rifkin published it in 1970 and has written other books including King Fishers Road (1963), Ladyfingers (1983), McQuiad (1974), McQuaid in August (1979), the Snow Rattlers (1977), and What Ship? Where Bound? (1961). Rifkin also served aboard the . Ben Hecht, which in 1947 attempted to run the British Blockade of Palestine, carrying hundreds of Holocaust survivors to Israel. Rifkin does a great job of capturing the look and feel of the rural south in the early sixties and the racism embedded in southern society.

The Murderer Vine book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Murderer Vine book. On their summer off from college, three boys went to Mississippi. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Murderer Vine (Hard Case Crime as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Published by Thriftbooks. As a member of the Hard Case Crime book club I received THE MURDERER VINE in the mail six weeks ago and promptly put it on the shelf

Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. Hiding out in Puerto Lagarto as the novel opens, our hero Joe Dunne begins a detailed confession to a traveling American priest. As a member of the Hard Case Crime book club I received THE MURDERER VINE in the mail six weeks ago and promptly put it on the shelf. I had a few books to read before I could get to it, even though I found the description on the back cover very engaging. It was an angle that I hadn't heard before- the father of a young man murdered while he helped fight for civil rights sounded pretty darned good to me.

Hard Case Crime: The Murderer Vine. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Hard Case Crime is an American imprint of hardboiled crime novels founded in 2004 by. .Starting in 2011, Titan Books replaced Dorchester as publisher of the series.

Hard Case Crime is an American imprint of hardboiled crime novels founded in 2004 by Charles Ardai (also the founder of the Internet service Juno Online Services) and Max Phillips.

A Hard Case Crime novel. Joe Dunne is hired to find and kill the men responsible for the disappearance of three boys, who, during their summer off from college, went to Mississippi to work for the Civil Rights movement.

There were a lot of things I would need. A new driver’s license. But I knew people who would help me get them. I took a pad of yellow legal paper. and wrote down a list of illegal things I needed, illegal things I needed done. I wrote down several names of illegal people and connected them with pencil lines to my list. Crossed out. Reinserted. I must have changed my mind as many times as Kirby had when she was looking in that window across the street. Next I wrote down my plot.

General Interest The Murderer Vine (Hard Case Crime (Paperback)) (Hard Case Crime (Mass Market Paperback)) Product Details: Category: Books ISBN: 0843959614 Title: The Murderer Vine (Hard Case Crime (Paperback)) (Hard Case Crime (Mass Market Paperback)) The Fast Free Shipping Author: Rifkin, Shepard Publisher: Dorchester Publishing Year Published: 2007 Number of Pages: 256 Book Binding: Paperback Prizes: N/A Book Condition: VERYGOOD SKU .

Подписчиков: 6 ты. себе: Yesterday's and today's best crime ficti. себе: Yesterday's and today's best crime fiction, served piping hot.

BECAUSE OLD TIMES THERE ARE NOT FORGOTTEN On their summer off from college, three boys went to Mississippi to work for civil rights. They were never seen again. So the father of one of the boys hired New York private eye Joe Dunne. His assignment: Find the men responsible, and don’t come home until they’re dead…
Comments: (7)
ℓo√ﻉ
Shepard Rifkin's The Murderer Vine is number 43 of the Hard Case Crime series. Rifkin published it in 1970 and has written other books including King Fishers Road (1963), Ladyfingers (1983), McQuiad (1974), McQuaid in August (1979), the Snow Rattlers (1977), and What Ship? Where Bound? (1961). Rifkin also served aboard the S.S. Ben Hecht, which in 1947 attempted to run the British Blockade of Palestine, carrying hundreds of Holocaust survivors to Israel.

The Murderer Vine is an absolutely terrific book and an enjoyable read at that. The cover features top-notch artwork by Ken Laager of a compelling blonde in high heels and a bed sheet with her feet wrapped in a vine. Although this precise scene is not in the book, it gives some of the atmosphere of the book and the woman is obviously none other than Kirby. In a brief foreword to the book, Rifkin explains that that, in the Amazon, a vine grows that climbs higher every year and has tentacles that reach out, and block the sunlight and the tree that it grew on eventually dies. He explains that, in South America, it is called La Liana Matador or the Murderer Vine.

The book is definitely hardboiled and definitely noir. It is a combination of a hardboiled detective novel with the subject matter being the famous slaying of the civil rights workers in Mississippi. The route that Rifkin takes to this subject, however, is unique. He doesn't focus on the moral or ethical aspects of that shocking event. In his fictionalized account, a father of one of the three young men who were brutally murdered hires a private eye (Dunne) to go down to Mississippi and find out who did this, get proof of who did it, and execute those responsible. The bounty offered is $100,000 per murderer and that half a million is more than this poor private eye could hope to make in a lifetime. The story is brilliantly told and, although there are a few meanderings in the beginning, it all worked for me.

The story begins in Puerto Lagarto (Porto Lizard) somewhere south of the Yucatan. It is a "dump" that is hot, sweaty, and has no paved streets and only one place with ice. Dunne explains that the refrigerator in the cantina is packed full of beer every morning and "I sit in the Bitterness and drink my way from the front to the back of the refrigerator and look at the bay." He hasn't seen any outsider in two years, but is now offering a sort of confession to a priest who has happened along. He explains: "If someone came here by mistake, he wouldn't like the food or the damp heat or the hammocks or the people. I don't like them either. But there's one big advantage living here. They don't extradite." Let that one sink in for a while.

The tale he tells goes back in time and he describes how he was once worked a job in Haskell (wherever that is) and a pusher had moved into the area, selling to the high school kids and the soccer moms. What happened, he explains, is that "one of the mothers walks in one evening into her fifteen-year-old daughter's room to find the kid mainlining horse into her thigh. Horse, that's heroin." He explains that the police wouldn't do anything and he wanted Dunne to do something, anything.

Well, after doing that job apparently his reputation for getting a tough job done, no questions asked, got out and Parrish walks into his office. "Parrish looked like a rich guy with a problem." The narrator "had him figured for a banker with a nice Bahama tan and a wandering wife who may have been necking with the mate of his chartered fishing boat." Instead, Parrish leans in and tells him that he wants him to kill five people.

Part of the story (and a major part at that) is the burgeoning romance between Dunne and his secretary, Kirby, who had originally been from the South and had been taking diction lessons trying to lose her upper-class Southern accent. "She had put her legs up on the desk. For the first time I noticed how long they were. She was holding the book above eye level, and her head was tilted backward. Her long yellow hair was swinging free. She was smiling at the book and tugging at her earlobe. I suppose that was the first time I noticed her."

And notices her, he does. "Her eyelids were painted a pale blue. I watched as she ran an index finger over the left one and her thumb over the other. They were the color of an early morning sky in summer."

Kirby volunteers to accompany the detective deep into the South as he will stick out like a sore thumb as a northerner and she can smooth the way with her down-home ways. Of course, once they pose as husband and wife, you know the fireworks are starting.

A lot of first half involves the preparations for going undercover, including creating an identity as a Canadian professor researching accents. The real action takes place as they head into the small town in the South and Dunne has to find ways to make time with the redneck sheriff and his cronies and figure out where the bodies are buried.

The writing is superb and the build-up to the climax is fantastic. This is another selection worthy of being in the Hard Case lineup. Rifkin does a great job of capturing the look and feel of the rural south in the early sixties and the racism embedded in southern society. He makes the reader feel as if they are back in the backwoods country, drinking moonshine with the rednecks who are quick with guns and tire chains and don't tolerate outsiders poking into local affairs.

This is one of those books that, as a reader, you don't want to put down until you finish. It's that good.
Ishnllador
Good but a little too colloquial.
Thorgahuginn
Suffice it to say that this is one of the better Hard Case Crimes I have read (in my top 5). Well written and plotted and has a morality to it as is common with the best of the genre.
I intend to see if I can find other books by this author (nothing listed on Amazon)
Saintrius
If you are a mystery reader, this needs to be on your list. It will stay with you.
Tiainar
Good story. Liked it very much.
Abandoned Electrical
Moved very very SLOW
Alianyau
This book has no redeeming qualities and no social agenda - it is pure escape and lots of fun. Plot spoiler (?) - you can figure out the ending long before the end of the book if you've watched TV mysteries or read a dozen books in this category. Even so, I'll bet you'll keep reading until the last page - I did.
As I read more and more of Hard Case Crime's re-releases of old mysteries from decades past, I have noticed that in a certain way they are mostly similar in that they focus on crime. That, in itself, is not surprising (especially given the name of the publisher), but what is a little more so is where the focus isn't: on anything even vaguely political. The Murderer Vine by Shepard Rifkin, originally published in 1970, is an exception.

The politics in this case deal with the civil rights movement in the Deep South. Then three young men disappear while trying to register black voters, murder is the obvious conclusion to be arrived at and, of course, the fix is in to make sure no one is ever prosecuted for the crime. One of the victims, however, has a rich father, and he hires ex-cop-turned-private-eye Joe Dunne to find the bodies, determine who the killers are, and make sure they pay the ultimate price. Dunne has some ethics, but the hundreds of thousands of dollars his client offers overrides any moral concerns.

Dunne heads down to Mississippi along with his beautiful assistant Kirby, who not only offers cover, but as a native Southerner, can teach him the ways of Dixie. Figuring out who the killers are will require blending into small town Southern life and - against Dunne's better nature - adopting a bit of a racist nature.

Will he succeed? Well, the novel begins with Dunne hiding out in Latin America, telling his tale in the form of a confession to a visiting priest. He has committed some sort of crime to justify his hiding out here, but what it is - and how it was done - is the basis of the story.

The Murderer Vine is not the best in the Hard Case Crime series, but it is a decent book. The main flaw is that the first half is pretty slow moving, and it takes nearly a hundred pages (out of a 250 page book) for Dunne to finally get to his destination. Once he's there, however, things to pick up, and by the end, things really move. This one should not be your first choice in this series, but when you get to it, you won't be disappointed.