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eBook One Was a Soldier (Clare Fergusson/Russ Van Alstyne Mysteries) download

by Suzanne Toren,Julia Spencer-Fleming

eBook One Was a Soldier (Clare Fergusson/Russ Van Alstyne Mysteries) download ISBN: 0792763912
Author: Suzanne Toren,Julia Spencer-Fleming
Publisher: Blackstone Audio; Unabridged edition (April 12, 2011)
Language: English
ePub: 1327 kb
Fb2: 1884 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: txt lrf azw mobi
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Mystery

Clare Fergusson wants to forget the things she saw as a combat helicopter pilot and concentrate on her relationship with Chief of Police Russ Van Alstyne.

Clare Fergusson wants to forget the things she saw as a combat helicopter pilot and concentrate on her relationship with Chief of Police Russ Van Alstyne. MP Eric McCrea needs to control the explosive anger threatening his job as a police officer. Will Ellis, high school track star, faces the reality of life as a double amputee. Orthopedist Trip Stillman is denying the extent of his traumatic brain injury. Julia Spencer-Fleming. On a warm September evening in the Millers Kill community center, five veterans sit down in rickety chairs to try to make sense of their experiences in Iraq.

One Was a Soldier: A Clare Fergusson Russ Van Alstyne Mystery (Clare Fergusson Russ Van Alstyne Mysteries). Download (epub, 409 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

In her dream, Clare Fergusson was flying. There was a long pause. Fast and low, heeled hard to the Black Hawk’s nose, aiming for the drifting gray-brown column of smoke and debris on the horizon.

Julia Spencer-Fleming. He wasn’t under any illusions. When Hector DeJean started talking about a good hostage, Russ knew it sure as hell wasn’t him. These guys didn’t think much of women, and a scared, pregnant. female probably seemed like a present wrapped up in a bow to them. They underestimated Clare-lots of men did-and she would use that. No matter what happened to him, she would find a way to save herself and the baby. He held to that thought like the last remaining ember in a dying fire. You sure you don’t want me to come along?.

Series: Clare Fergusson/Russ Van Alstyne Mysteries (Book 7. Clare Fergusson and Russ Van Alstyne Mystery). It is narrated once again by Suzanne Toren. I had forgotten how perfectly she delivers a Virginia accent. The publisher's blurb sets the scene: "On a warm September evening in the Millers Kill community center, five veterans sit down in rickety chairs to try to make sense of their experiences in Iraq. The Rev. Clare Fergusson wants to forget the things she saw as a combat helicopter pilot and concentrate on her relationship with Chief of Police Russ Van Alstyne.

The seventh in the New York Times bestselling mystery series for fans of Louise Penny and Elizabeth George. Books related to One Was a Soldier: Clare Fergusson/Russ Van Alstyne 7. Skip this list. Retired With Prejudice.

And Clare was a soldier and also a priest, And Russ was a vet and a chief of police. Spencer-Fleming's series reaches another apex with this book. By combining Clare's military experience with her calling as a minister, the plot reflects the difficulty of re-entry by a variety of combat pros into a different and far more sedate community.

Clare Fergusson and Russ Van Alstyne Mystery). It is, however, well worth the wait. Clare, an Episcopalian priest and a Major in the Guard, has finally returned from Iraq, where she flew helicopters. Both Clare, and the man she loves, Police Chief Russ Van Alstyne, are eager to be together again.

One Was a Soldier: A Clare Fergusson and Russ Van Alstyne Mystery. by Julia Spencer-Fleming. Clare Fergusson’s voice was dry. Sarah stopped herself before she could ask them to explain

One Was a Soldier: A Clare Fergusson and Russ Van Alstyne Mystery. Sarah stopped herself before she could ask them to explain. She’d need a clearer picture of their interrelationships eventually, but right now she wanted to focus on opening the first door to whatever issues they might have.

Chief of Police Russ Van Alstyne shook his head. What we really need is another officer on the force.

Sarah made a go-on gesture. Chief of Police Russ Van Alstyne shook his head. That way, we wouldn’t be overscheduling everybody.

At the Millers Kill community center, five veterans gather to work on adjusting to life after war. Reverend Clare Fergusson has returned from Iraq with a head full of bad memories she's using alcohol to wipe out. And down-on-her-luck Tally McNabb has brought home a secret--a fatal one. Police Chief Russ Van Alstyne just wants Clare to settle down and get married--to him. But when he rules Tally McNabb's death a suicide, Clare sides with the other vets against him. Russ and Clare's unorthodox investigation will uncover a trail of deceit that runs from their tiny Adirondack town to the upper ranks of the Army, and from the waters of the Millers Kill to the unforgiving streets of Baghdad.
Comments: (7)
Connorise
I've been a fan of this series for several years and had pre-ordered this book back before it was delayed a year due to a missed deadline. So my anticipation built up for an extra year and I was headed for disappointment. After all, many of my other favorite long-time running series have been disappointing me the last couple of years. I won't name them here, but it is tempting!

So I started reading One Was a Soldier the day it arrived on my doorstep. And I read it through in one day and was satisfied. Yes, it has some flaws--all books do--but they were considerably outnumbered by the overall excellence of the book. Spencer-Fleming writes a good mystery--this wasn't her strongest, but it's fine--and centers her characters in the real world. This novel is more about soldiers coming home from deployment which can be a tough topic but was adeptly managed here to avoid too many cliches or depression. After all, I read this series overall for entertainment. I do want to think and be challenged, but not depressed. That balance was achieved for me.

Most importantly, many of my favorite characters are back. What Spencer-Fleming does best is create an entire town of people you know and care about. Each person is an individual and does not get confusing even if character names are similar. That's a feat. It's not a cozy mystery although cozy fans will probably enjoy it, but the characters are just as important as the story. I thought the device of the support group meetings introducing the continuing elements of the story worked well and I admit those kind of devices often bore or frustrate me if they aren't done well. The character growth and development made sense even if it felt some were becoming stagnant and others took a step or two backwards. However, the effects of being a soldier explained that for some of the characters. I don't want to give anything away.

If you are a fan of the series, I think you'll be as happy as I was. If you aren't, this book would be fine for starting but it is definitely HIGHLY RECOMMENDED to start at the beginning and enjoy the entire journey. Be warned, that there is also a cliffhanger ending as well as some unresolved relationships that make the long wait for the next book another bittersweet challenge for the series' fans.
Ishnllador
This is the best in the series! Start with:In the Bleak Midwinter (A Rev. Clare Fergusson and Russ Van Alstyne Mystery).

The publisher's blurb sets the scene:

"On a warm September evening in the Millers Kill community center, five veterans sit down in rickety chairs to try to make sense of their experiences in Iraq. The Rev. Clare Fergusson wants to forget the things she saw as a combat helicopter pilot and concentrate on her relationship with Chief of Police Russ Van Alstyne. MP Eric McCrea needs to control the explosive anger threatening his job as a police officer. Will Ellis, high school track star, faces the reality of life as a double amputee. Orthopedist Trip Stillman is denying the extent of his traumatic brain injury. And bookkeeper Tally McNabb wrestles with guilt over the in-country affair that may derail her marriage. But coming home is harder than it looks. One vet will struggle with drugs and alcohol. One will lose his family and friends. One will die.

Since their first meeting, Russ and Clare's bond has been tried, torn, and forged by adversity. But when he rules the veteran's death a suicide, she violently rejects his verdict, drawing the surviving vets into an unorthodox investigation that threatens jobs, relationships, and her own future with Russ. As the days cool and the nights grow longer, they will uncover a trail of deceit that runs from their tiny town to the upper ranks of the U.S. Army and from the waters of the Millers Kill to the unforgiving streets of Baghdad."

Although the author's over-use of vulgarity weakens her written word, one of Spencer-Fleming's strengths is her prose style. There are over twenty words and phrases describing the human voice, and sometimes an animal's voice. For example:

"He could hear her talking, shrill and distant, like a bird afraid of a stranger under her nest."

At times Spencer-Fleming creates phrases, for example, "early modern valium," but it works:

"The waiting room was done in early modern valium, all mellow colors and soft lights. The well-sprung modular seating said: 'Stretch out here and have a nap. Everything will be fine.'"

At the core of ONE WAS A SOLDIER is the courage and compassion of the military and the tellling of their stories. It is not to be back-seated for a mere body or two in a mystery story.

It is about police officer, Eric McCrea:

"The pedestrians bothered him. He was ok with people walking, and he was relaxed as he ever was with other drivers when he was behind the wheel. But, driving past pedestrians, getting flickering views of faces, back packs, hands, shopping bags, made his shoulders bunch up around his ears and his scalp tighten."

It is about high school track star, Will Ellis.
He is a parishioner of Rev. Clare's and she reminds him:

"Anger just is. . . . We're all so in love with the idea of moving on and growing through loss and making lemonade when life hands us lemons that we don't take time to mourn. Before you can move on, you have to stand still and account for what's been lost. Sometimes you have to throw the . . . lemons against the wall and yell, 'I wanted chocolae chip cookies, not this bitter fruit.'"

And finally, it is about Rev Clare Fergusseon. She says to Will: "There are a lot of us who came back wounded, some of us just don't show it on the outside."

Clare draws upon her faith in God. With a touch of humor in her voice she asserts: "That's my civilian job, I'm God."

But Clare draws upon her faith in Russ as well:

"He just stood there. His grip warm and steady.
Letting her hold the truth in her hands, letting her raise it up and swallow it was cold, very cold, and no amount of sugar could sweeten its bitter taste. . . . Russ looked at her, looked into her, inviting her to lay down all her lies and deep-dive into the truth with him. She couldn't face that bottomless well. 'I'm afraid.' He wrapped his arms around her."

This book is not to be missed. It is narrated once again by Suzanne Toren. I had forgotten how perfectly she delivers a Virginia accent. Thank you.
Westened
Each book in this graceful series about the lives of an Episcopal priest, Clare, and her soul mate (and husband, by book's end), police chief Russ, sensitively and organically weaves an important issue into the narrative. In this book, the issue is the struggle undergone by soldiers returning to everyday life after the horrors of war. As ever, the story is engaging and well plotted, and the message, as ever, is effectively conveyed without being heavy-handed. I'm very happy I judged the first book in this series by its cover and became acquainted with these people.