carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Enter the Lion: A Posthumous Memoir of Mycroft Holmes

eBook Enter the Lion: A Posthumous Memoir of Mycroft Holmes download

by Michael P. Hodel

eBook Enter the Lion: A Posthumous Memoir of Mycroft Holmes download ISBN: 0460044834
Author: Michael P. Hodel
Publisher: Orion Publishing Co (1980)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1926 kb
Fb2: 1714 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: rtf lrf mobi docx
Category: Mystery

Mycroft as he felt that there was already an abundance of Sherlock Holmes pastiches. Mycroft Holmes at Titan Books.

Having been a fan of the original Sherlock Holmes stories as a child, Abdul-Jabbar specifically chose to write about Mycroft as he felt that there was already an abundance of Sherlock Holmes pastiches. Reading Michael P. Hodel and Sean M. Wright's Enter the Lion: A Posthumous Memoir of Mycroft Holmes caused Abdul-Jabbar to realize "more could be done with. this ‘older, smarter’ character and his window on to the highest levels of British government – at a time when Britain was the most powerful country in the world.

The authors of Enter the Lion - A Posthumous Memoir of Mycroft Homes, who portray themselves . Note: The author, Michael P. Hodel, succumbed to lung cancer in 1986. I was gifted a copy of his late brother’s book by retired LAPD Homicide detective and true-crime author Steve Hodel

Note: The author, Michael P. I was gifted a copy of his late brother’s book by retired LAPD Homicide detective and true-crime author Steve Hodel.

Hodel, Michael P; Wright, Sean . joint author. Holmes, Sherlock (Fictitious character). New York : Hawthorn Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

That's for Mycroft Holmes - with the aid of his younger brother Sherlock - to find out! The tale is cleverly told in the literary debut of Mycroft, seven years older than his celebrated sibling, quite Falstaffian in appearance but no less.

That's for Mycroft Holmes - with the aid of his younger brother Sherlock - to find out! The tale is cleverly told in the literary debut of Mycroft, seven years older than his celebrated sibling, quite Falstaffian in appearance but no less intelligent, and very much the sleuth. In 1875 a strange party of arrogrant Americans visits Whitehall on suspicious business. Shortly thereafter, on the streets of London, a shooting takes place; one of the Americans is injured. A mysterious black stranger makes a threatening appearance at the door of the British government. What does it mean - where will it lead? That's for Mycroft Holmes - with the aid of his younger brother Sherlock - to find out!

and by JM Dent & Sons Ltd. in 1980 in London.

and by JM Dent & Sons Ltd. ISBN 0-460-04483-4) and in paperback by Playboy Press in 1980). The action takes place in 1875, ten years after the end of the American Civil War, at the time when Mycroft Holmes was a minor official in the Foreign Office.

Yes-Mycroft Holmes, who, as any Baker Street Irregular will tell you, was Sherlock's older, fatter, lazier, but equally gifted brother

Yes-Mycroft Holmes, who, as any Baker Street Irregular will tell you, was Sherlock's older, fatter, lazier, but equally gifted brother. Here he's the pleasant narrator of a slab of harmless folderol about a dastardly 1875 plot: several Confederate diehards have arrived in London, determined to bribe and connive their way into an alliance with Britain to overthrow the . Mycroft learns of this scheme through his position in the Foreign Office; in fact, it's his boss there, Jerrold Moriarty (yes, father of the Moriarty), who is in cahoots with the Rebels!

Bibliographic Details  . Hodel and Wright go a step further, and offer insightful footnotes throughout which help to illuminate past and future items in the Canon, as well as historical perspective

Bibliographic Details Publisher: Hawthorn Books, New York. Publication Date: 1979. Hodel and Wright go a step further, and offer insightful footnotes throughout which help to illuminate past and future items in the Canon, as well as historical perspective.

Manufacturer: Playboy Press Release date: 19 August 1979 ISBN-10 : 0872167119 ISBN-13: 9780872167117. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Enter the Lion: A Posthumous Memoir of Mycroft . Books spine may be slightly creased due to age and wear.

Books spine may be slightly creased due to age and wear.

Physical description; xxii, 237 pages ; 24 cm. Notes; Bibliography: p. 236-237. Subject; Fiction in English.
Comments: (5)
net rider
I enjoyed this story immensely. The byplay between the introspective brothers, Mycroft and Sherlock, is really fun. And the mystery is intriguing. But I still wonder why Mycroft wd describe his kidnapping as taking him across Tower Bridge in 1975 shen it wasn't built until 20 years later.
Геракл
This is a thoroughly compelling novel. I highly recommend its reading. The authors of “Enter the Lion - A Posthumous Memoir of Mycroft Homes”, who portray themselves as “editors” of a long-lost Mycroft Holmes manuscript had me accepting their premise from dust jacket to dust jacket.

As a novelist and true-crime writer myself, how anyone accomplishes a whole novel in collaboration with another writer is still a mystery to me. Suffice to say, they accomplished their mission with alacrity, aplomb, a hearty and facile vocabulary, and with imagination that felt totally Holmesian!

Fiction is an expansive and inclusive genre. It allows the author (or authors, in this case) to tell the story that their imaginings fabricate. Within the stricture (unless a fantasy) seeming to be 'of real life' there is little restriction as to content. When one adds strictures such as an historical time-period or historical events plus the “Holmesian Canon” to circumscribe the fiction you fabricate one makes one's effort the more mentally and physically intense. I applaud Messrs. Hodel and Wright for their fine accomplishment in story-telling!

Note: The author, Michael P. Hodel, succumbed to lung cancer in 1986. I was gifted a copy of his late brother’s book by retired LAPD Homicide detective and true-crime author Steve Hodel.
Wizard
This is as unique an effort to capture the essence of the Mycroft Holmes character as I have ever been fortunate enough to enjoy. Second probably only to Quinn Fawcett's more recent work on the "Brotherhood" series, this 1979 novel by Michael Hodel and Sean Wright really brings the Mycroft Holmes character alive.
The authors explain how they stumble across the hidden manuscript in an antique store, and then present the work for the reader. I believe this book pre-dates or is a contemporary of the work of Nicholas Meyer, who used a similar device in his books ("Seven Percent Solution", etc.), to explain how he came across new Sherlock stories. Hodel and Wright go a step further, and offer insightful footnotes throughout which help to illuminate past and future items in the Canon, as well as historical perspective.
In the manuscript (reportedly written in the clear, concise hand of Mycroft himself), a young Mycroft relates an adventure involving a political plot to embroil England in a second American Civil War. Murder and intrigue are the order of the day, and our hapless Foreign Office assistant is right in the middle! The pace rarely slows, and Sherlock is on hand to assist as he begins laying the groundwork to become the world's first consulting detective.
One of the interesting things about the story is that authors Hodel and Wright eschew the usual Dr. Watson stand-in, and allow the Mycroft character to relate the events in first-person. The result is a Sherlock story with a completely different and refreshing perspective. This is especially important as we gain an understanding of the Holmes/Moriarty feud.
The real mystery is why the book is not more well-known to followers of Mycroftia (let alone Sherlockia), and why there were no further Mycroft tales from these authors.
Andromakus
The plot is too farfetched to make the story work. A group of southerners plan to get enough low ranking ministers on their side to join them in reclaiming not only the south but the entire United States for the Confederacy, which will then rejoin Britain as an semi-independent country. Of course Mycroft Holmes learns of the plot and works with his brother to stop it, along with a mercenary former slave and other unlikely helpers.
There's too much of the elder Holmes in this one, running around and almost falling in love. The Great Detective is reduced to a bit part and comes off rather dull when described by his brother rather than Watson. There are a few showy deductions, but with no Watson to impress there's little point in them.
One huge mistake cannot be overlooked either. On being abducted Mycroft deduces he's being driven over Tower Bridge, quite a trick for a book set in 1875 since Tower Bridge was opened in 1894! One could overlook a mistake like that in a story supposedly written by Watson, he's always hazy with facts, but Mycroft is supposed to be a genius and would know when things were built.
I'm giving it three stars anyway since Sherlock Holmes at least remains more or less true to his origins for a change.
Arilak
It must be very difficult to write in a tone that comes close to Conan Doyle's, let alone in the voice of Sherlock Holmes's "smarter brother." The authors fail, in my opinion. I was able to stay with the story for 50 pages, before wincing and groaning at the language exhausted me. Maybe you'll have better luck with it.