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eBook St. Peter's Finger download

by Gladys Mitchell

eBook St. Peter's Finger download ISBN: 085468140X
Author: Gladys Mitchell
Publisher: Imprint unknown; New edition edition (April 1972)
Language: English
Pages: 351
ePub: 1130 kb
Fb2: 1809 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi lrf docx azw
Category: Mystery

Printed in the United States of America.

Printed in the United States of America. For information, address St. Martin’s Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, . Mitchell, Gladys, 1901-St.

Gladys Mitchell wrote some fine mysteries featuring psychologist/sleuth Beatrice Lestrange Bradly and I think this is one of the best

Gladys Mitchell wrote some fine mysteries featuring psychologist/sleuth Beatrice Lestrange Bradly and I think this is one of the best. It takes the formidable Mrs. Bradley right out of her natural element and pits her against a breed of human with which she's unfamiliar - Roman Catholic nuns. St Peter's Finger is a sea-side convent which runs both a boarding/day school for girls whose parents can afford the fees and an orphanage.

by. Mitchell, Gladys, 1901-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Bradley, Beatrice Lestrange (Fictitious character), Women detectives. New York : St. Martin's Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on May 14, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

This is a vintage murder mystery. Dame Beatrice Lestrange Bradley becomes involved in investigating an apparent mystery at a convent school.

St Peter& Finger Mitchell, Gladys Random House 9780099583950 Глэдис Митчелл: Палец Св. Петра : Mrs Bradley, renowned psychologist and private detective, is. .St Peter& Finger, Mitchell, Gladys. Варианты приобретения. Петра : Mrs Bradley, renowned psychologist and private detective, is summoned to the convent school of S.

Peter's Finger (Mrs. Bradley). Hillmaston School has chosen The Mikado for their next school performance and, in recognition of her generous offer to finance the production, their meek and self-effacing arithmetic mistress is offered a key role. But when she disappears mid-way through the opening night performance and is later found dead, unconventional psychoanalyst Mrs Bradley is called in to investigate.

A VINTAGE MURDER MYSTERY Rediscover Gladys Mitchell – one of the 'Big Three' female crime fiction .

A VINTAGE MURDER MYSTERY Rediscover Gladys Mitchell – one of the 'Big Three' female crime fiction writers alongside Agat. If you like Poirot and Miss Marple, you’ll love Mrs Bradley.

Comments: (7)
Malakelv
Gladys Mitchell wrote some fine mysteries featuring psychologist/sleuth Beatrice Lestrange Bradly and I think this is one of the best. It takes the formidable Mrs. Bradley right out of her natural element and pits her against a breed of human with which she's unfamiliar - Roman Catholic nuns.

St Peter's Finger is a sea-side convent which runs both a boarding/day school for girls whose parents can afford the fees and an orphanage. Many of the "orphans" simply lack family who can care for them ( or who want to .) Kindly Father Thomas sends these girls to the nuns in hope of giving them a better life. But in 1930's England, a "better life" for the poor doesn't include the notion of equality. The paying students and the orphans are kept separate and the orphanage is run on austere (harsh by our standards) lines. Some of the girls become institutionalized and are afraid of returning to the outside world. Others - like the "refreshingly unregenerate" Bessie - can't wait to get away.

It's among the paying students that trouble breaks out. Three cousins - granddaughters of a rich American - are boarders and one is found dead under suspicious circumstances. There's an out-cry among the locals. Do they really believe that the nuns are neglectful or is it a symptom of anti-Catholic prejudice - still very strong in England at that time? Mrs. Bradley is called in at the request of her lawyer-son, who's a friend of Father Thomas. She has no prejudice against the nuns, but finds their secretive ways baffling.

As with all of Mitchell's books, the mystery is less important than the characters. The personalities, quirks, and backgrounds of the various nuns are explored in loving detail. These are not just cardboard figures in habits, but real women with real emotions. They include a famous actress and several respected artists and most of them are women who could have been successful professionals. Although not a Roman Catholic herself, Mitchell clearly respected the religious life and was sympathetic to those who choose it. But the "Rule of Silence" prevents the free-flowing gossip during which Mrs. Bradley normally picks up so many clues. The nuns are women who are accustomed to keeping their thoughts to themselves.

With typical humor, Mitchell makes the part-time Physical Education teacher one of the most prominent suspects. She was a "Games Mistress" herself (although she also taught English) and she seems to have enjoyed poking fun at her profession. But there's a serious side, also. This woman is a teacher who isn't suited to be one and who doesn't really like teaching and it shows in her treatment of the students. Mitchell felt strongly that education was a career that should be open only to those who loved it as much as she did.

I think this is one of the most intriguing of a wonderful series. Mrs Bradley's driver George is in fine form - whether he's searching for evidence or debating the merits of Dickens with his employer. The shockingly violent ending isn't typical of Mitchell's books, but it's handled with her usual verve. Don't miss this one.
MARK BEN FORD
I have to admit this has been a tough read. There are so many words that are "1930's England - related" that at times I spend more time with a dictionary - and of course many of the words are not even covered there. But of course that is not a fault - just a fact for a non-Brit reader. (and it does satisfy a desire to learn about history while reading the mystery). Second - there are so many characters that one needs a scorecard to try to remember who said or did what as the story progresses. On the positive side, I have found it mentally challenging - though it felt like a series of alternating boring reading followed by a realization that grabbed my interest, over and over again. During the boring parts, I was very tempted to just skip to the end and be done with it... but then some interesting pearl appears and I keep reading on. I may very well purchase other books by the author.
Ieslyaenn
When a boarding student is found dead in a bathtub full of water everyone wants to think it was suicide but she did not drown. She died from carbon monoxide poisoning... and she was the heiress to a huge fortune. The coroner rules it an accident but no one can accept this. Mrs. Bradley waves her fee and conducts an investigation. I did figure out who was the murderer and early on but, with the author's convoluted plot lines I was not sure I was right until the end. The nuns and the girls from their orphanage were no help either. They tidied up the bathroom! When "accidents" occurred someone was always cleaning up any mess. Honestly! Today's police investigators would be furious. However, Mrs. Bradley manages to ferret out the culprit.

Life in a convent is certainly interesting and Gladys Mitchell makes it as fascinating as any modern thriller. I am sorry I missed her books when I was younger but I am very happy to be reading them now. I love the complicated plots and the diverse variety of characters in each book. If you like tangled webs of deceit then you will enjoy this book.
Kearanny
Set in a convent/girls' school, this novel is another enjoyable entry in the Mrs. Bradley mystery series. Despite being not especially likable as a person, Mrs. Bradley is an entertaining, eccentric sleuth in the mold of classic detective fiction. The setting is atmospheric and the mystery is clever, though a bit unfair as the reader is not privy to everything that Mrs. Bradley knows until she reveals all at the end. As seems to be the case with many of the books in this series, a superabundance of characters sometimes makes following who is doing what a bit of a chore. Nonetheless, fans of Golden Age British mysteries should find St. Peter's Finger a pleasant read.
Umrdana
One of my most enjoyed genre. I bought this as a Kindle deal and enjoyed it so much, I bought a couple more by this same author. The main character is a woman well ahead of her time. Women at the early part of the twentieth century were groomed and expected to focus solely on making an advantageous marriage, have children and run a household. The only deviation from this would be to engage in charitable activities. Not Mrs. Bradley!
Don't be put off by the fact that the time frame is in the pre World War II era. Gladys Mitchell is in the same league as Agatha Christie - timeless!
Boyn
Enjoyable read. Interesting mystery. Fascinating characters. Look into a time gone by, but be prepared to pay attention if you want to keep up witj Mrs B.
Direbringer
I did like this story. Throughout the book I was kept guessing trying to figure out how this thirteen year old girl was drowned in the bathtub and why! Interesting characters, too. I will mostly likely give this one a re-read after I've completed the others. It's a well thought out story, as I've come to expect from Ms. Mitchell's writings.