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by Raymond Chandler

eBook The Raymond Chandler Papers : Selected Letters and Non-Fiction, 1909-1959 download ISBN: 0241140366
Author: Raymond Chandler
Publisher: No Imprint; First Edition edition (2000)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1582 kb
Fb2: 1263 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf doc txt lit
Category: Mystery

The Raymond Chandler Papers brings together the correspondence and other previously uncollected writing of. Roger Lowenstein, The Wall Street Journal" "For the Chandler fan, The Raymond Chandler Papers.

The Raymond Chandler Papers brings together the correspondence and other previously uncollected writing of America's undisputed master of crime fiction and creator of the iconic private eye Phillip Marlowe, revealing all aspects of the great artist's powerful personality and broad intellectual curiosity.

The Raymond Chandler Papers brings together the correspondence and .

The Raymond Chandler Papers brings together the correspondence and other previously uncollected writing of America’s undisputed master of crime fiction and creator of the iconic private eye Philip Marlowe, revealing all aspects of the great artist’s powerful personality and broad intellectual curiosity. Selected letters and nonfiction of one of America’s most beloved writers reveals the occasionally softer side of the man behind the hard-boiled mysteries (Library Journal).

The Raymond Chandler Papers book. Start by marking The Raymond Chandler Papers: Selected Letters and Nonfiction 1909-1959 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Oct 20, 2012 Brent Legault rated it really liked it.

Chandler returned to the US in 1919 to rekindle his literary career, but instead took a job with an oil company until he was fired in 1932 following a bout . The Raymond Chandler Papers: Selected Letters and Non-Fiction, 1909–1959. Hamish Hamilton, London.

Chandler returned to the US in 1919 to rekindle his literary career, but instead took a job with an oil company until he was fired in 1932 following a bout of depression, womanizing and heavy drinking. He began writing crime stories for the pulp magazines Black Mask, Detective Fiction Weekly, The Fortnightly Intruder and Dime Detective. The stories were subsequently brought.

The Raymond Chandler Papers brings together the correspondence and other previously uncollected writing of. .Tam incelemeyi okuyun. The Raymond Chandler papers: selected letters and non-fiction, 1909-1959. It would be a mistake to brush this work aside as just one more collection of letters written by yet another opinionated author with a drinking problem. This slim volume packs a powerful punch.

Raymond Chandler's letters and journalism are worth reading even by those not acquainted with his fiction. At moments, in fact, they match the lucid heights of his fiction. Chandler's papers start with his first creative output – poems and essays – written in London shortly before the outbreak of World War I. Chandler was in his late teens and early twenties at the time, having finished his education at Dulwich College in south London, and a year learning German and French on the Continent.

The Raymond Chandler Papers brings together the correspondence and other previously uncollected writing of America’s undisputed master of crime fiction and creator of the iconic private eye Phillip Marlowe, revealing all aspects of the great artist’s powerful personality and broad.

The Raymond Chandler Papers brings together the correspondence and other previously uncollected writing of America’s undisputed master of crime fiction and creator of the iconic private eye Phillip Marlowe, revealing all aspects of the great artist’s powerful personality and broad intellectual curiosity. A potted sketch of Chandler's life will be useful for those not familiar with his story.

Chris Petit reads the mournful, insomniac letters in The Raymond Chandler Papers. Certain authors generate the literary equivalent of merchandising: Raymond Chandler is currently one of them, fitting snugly into the overlap between popular and academic studies. This latest volume of correspondence and bits and bobs, much of it previously published, is the equivalent of the Chandler Heritage Mug with endorsement from P D James, and designed for the shelf rather than to be read. Read through, it's OK if taken at a clip with judicious use of the index, though too much bad early stuff is included for bulk.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Physical description; xi, 266 p. ; 25 cm. Notes; Includes index. Summary; "I don't know why the hell I write so many letters", Raymond Chandler once wrote, in a letter. "I guess my mind is just too active for its own good!" It was also, as Tom Hiney points out in this new selection from Chandler's correspondence, a result of his peripatetic existence, his intense reclusivity, and his insomniac efforts to keep the night at bay. Writing and dictating long into the early hours, Chandler crafted his letters with a natural ease and an acute eye for people and places around him. His obervations on Hollywood and southern Californian life are perhaps unsurpassed by anyone, and his comments on the craft of writing and on fiction generally offer a fascinating insight into his own unique and innovative style. This anthology also features the best of Chandler's journalism and poetry, some of it never published before, including a lost interview, held in a Naples hotel in 1947, with the American gangster Lucky Luciano, and Chandler's classic and blistering account of attending the 1948 Oscar ceremonies. "The Chandler Papers" is both an ideal companion to Chandler's work and an intriguing account of the man himself. These are the definitive chronicles of a famous writer and a uniquely fascinating man: Hiney's biographical commentary through the course of the papers illuminates them against the times, places and twists of the strange life of Raymond Chandler. Subjects; Chandler, Raymond (1888-1959) - Correspondence. Authors, American - 20th century - Correspondence. Detective and mystery stories - Authorship. Novelists, American - 20th century - Biography. Essays, journals, letters & other prose works. Literary Collections / Letters. Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs. Chandler, Raymond.
Comments: (7)
Beranyle
Not just for Chandler fans (though anyone who's read Chandler is a fan). Not just for writers (though anyone who writes will be comforted and instructed). The book is a wonderfully keen (and occasionally cranky) observation of America in the 1940s and 50s, with buckshot at Hollywood, politics, crime, critics, corruption, literature and life. Curl up on a snowy weekend with this crackling American voice. Chandler is great company.

And if you're really into Chandler, try Frank McShane's biography of him.
Dugor
Selected letters--what else is there to say? If you are interested in Raymond Chandler, these letters provide insight into the man and his personal and professional life. Recommended reading.
Meztihn
Chandler'spapers demonstrate that he was far ranging in his commentary and show convincingly that he was first of all a writer beyong crime and Phillp Marlowe!
Anarawield
Great copy.
Gralinda
Good stuff, but if you're a devotee of Chandler you won't gain any startling new insights, or any insights at all. Nevertheless, even devotees should enjoy immersing themselves once again into the mind and times of Chandler. How that man could write!
Zyangup
What a fun collection this is! Another book of letters by another famous author I read recently was embarrassingly boring--it never should have been printed. But Chandler's style and pithy observations make this collection a treat. Though a loner and a lush, he maintained cordial relations with his colleagues, and his comments on the passing scene are keen. From acerbic observations on life in southern California, to wry descriptions of his cat's habits, to sometimes generous and sometimes acerbic appraisals of agents, publishers, and fellow writers, his prose is absolutely sparkling.
His coverage of Oscars night in the mid-Forties for The Atlantic magazine is a masterpiece of scorn for the glitterati. Around the same time he accurately dismisses the new medium of television's supposed threat to the book industry. People who tune in to watch "fourth-rate club fighters rub noses on the ropes are not losing any time from book reading." Just as frequently, Chandler comes across as thoughtful and a good friend--not at all Marlowe-ish, though you get the feeling he could be a tough guy if need be. If you read only one book of collected letters of a famous author this year, etc.
Rainpick
Much of The Raymond Chandler Papers: Selected Letters and Nonfiction 1909-1959 is gleaned from Chandler's La Jolla years, when he would dictate his correspondence late into the night. Written with a pitch-perfect ear for the American vernacular and the grammatical fastidiousness of a man born, bred, and classically educated in England, Selected Letters is an omnium gatherum of blunt, bleakly funny bon mots. On California: "There is a touch of the desert about everything in California, and about the minds of the people who live here." "We are so rootless here. I've lived half my life in California and made what use of it I could, but I could leave it forever without a pang." On his fan mail: "...[A]nother letter I had once from a girl in Seattle who said that she was interested in music and sex, and gave me the impression that, if I was pressed for time, I need not even bother to bring my own pyjamas." On himself: "All my best friends I have never seen. To know me in the flesh is to pass on to better things." Written in the dead of night with a Dictaphone and a bottle of gin, Chandler's letters are an inexhaustible fund of insights into the noir aesthetic, the sublime agonies of the writer's life, the American Language (as Mencken called it), and, forever and always, the sunbelt existentialism that shadows the California Dream.
Raymond Chandler wrote his letters, for the most part, late at night after a day of drinking. The letters provide an insight into the man who created the quintessential fictional PI, Philip Marlowe, and elevated what he called formula writing into a class of literature recognized by his contemporaries as art. The letters range from his laugh-out-loud take on science fiction--"Did you ever read what they call science fiction? It's a scream. It's written like this: I checked out K19 on Adabaran III, and stepped out through the crummaliote hatch..." to the sadness he experienced when his wife of more than thirty years passed away. I enthusiastically recommend this book. Even people who hadn't had the good fortune to read his classic mystery novels will be highly entertained.