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eBook What Freud Really Said: An Introduction to His Life and Thought (What They Really Said) download

by David Stafford-Clark

eBook What Freud Really Said: An Introduction to His Life and Thought (What They Really Said) download ISBN: 0805210806
Author: David Stafford-Clark
Publisher: Schocken; 1 edition (February 4, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 284
ePub: 1814 kb
Fb2: 1339 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr txt lit lrf
Category: Medics
Subcategory: Psychology

What Freud Really Said is a fairly slim volume that lacks detail and could be written in a more modern, understandable prose style for today’s audience.

What Freud Really Said is a fairly slim volume that lacks detail and could be written in a more modern, understandable prose style for today’s audience.

What Freud Really Said book.

David Stafford-Clark was an English psychiatrist and author. Библиографические данные.

As the person responsible for the birth of psychoanalysis and one of the sharpest clinical minds of the twentieth century, Freud continues to be one of the most influential thinkers of our time and one of the most controversial. For those interested in understanding the life and work of this seminal figure as well as the current debates that surround them, this book will prove an invaluable guide. David Stafford-Clark was an English psychiatrist and author.

What Freud Really Said. An Introduction to His Life and Thought. By David Stafford-Clark. Part of What They Really Said. As the person responsible for the birth of psychoanalysis and one of the sharpest clinical minds of the twentieth century, Freud continues to be one of the most influential thinkers of our time and one of the most controversial. For those interested in understanding the life and work of this seminal figure as well as the current debates that surround him, this book will prove an invaluable guide.

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This introduction to Freud describes his revolutionary ideas on hysteria and anxiety, and his interpretation of dreams, the unconscious mind, sexuality, the nature of neuroses and the techniques of psychoanalysis as well as his speculations on art, literature and life.

From The Life and Works of Sigmund Freud by Ernest Jones, Vo.

From The Life and Works of Sigmund Freud by Ernest Jones, Vol. I, ch. 1 (1953) p. . A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis, 1920, preface by G. Stanley Hall, Twentieth Lecture: General Theory of the Neuroses, The Sexual Life of Man, New York, Boni and Liveright, p. 273. (reprinted 1975 by Pocket pub.

What I’m really thinking: the owner of a 'dangerous' dog. There is at least one incident every week where a dog goes out of its . I won’t mention the latest terror attack. If you bring it up, I’ll say it’s sick, awful, depraved. There is at least one incident every week where a dog goes out of its way to make friends. She doesn’t want dog friends. Published: 4:00 AM. What I’m really thinking: the owner of a 'dangerous' dog. 11 November 2017. What I’m really thinking: the Muslim office worker. Is that enough? Or should I say I condemn it as a Muslim ? Published: 3:59 AM.

What Freud Really Said offers the most lucid overview available of Sigmund Freud, his legacy, and his place in our world. As the person responsible for the birth of psychoanalysis and one of the sharpest clinical minds of the twentieth century, Freud continues to be one of the most influential thinkers of our time and one of the most controversial. For those interested in understanding the life and work of this seminal figure as well as the current debates that surround him, this book will prove an invaluable guide.
Comments: (2)
Wooden Purple Romeo
What Freud Really Said is written in stodgy prose. Strafford-Clark is a good writer however and I began to prefer reading this to what I normally read. Late in the book his words do become tiring. Reading What Freud Really Said we learn that Freud was wrong about a few things. No surprise being Freud himself admitted much of what he wrote was speculation. Freud is really the beginning of understanding the human mind.

Freud would describe human motivation as Ero's, life/sex based drives, or Thanatos, death based instincts. Freud writes, in his opinion "men are not gentle creatures who want to be loved, and who at the most can defend themselves if they are attacked; they are, on the contrary, creatures among whose instinctual endowments is to be reckoned a powerful share of aggressiveness. As a result, their neighbor is for them not only a potential helper or sexual object, but also someone who tempts them to satisfy their aggressiveness on him, to exploit his capacity for work without compensation, to use him sexually without his consent, to seize his possessions, to humiliate him, to cause him pain, to torture and to kill him. . ." Freud, of course, also divided the mind into what he would label the ID, Ego and Super-ego. Freud attempted to categorize what perhaps can't be categorized. What Freud attempted to place in these different categories may spill over into each other. French writer Claparede, says, "Substitute 'unconscious' for 'heart' (in much of literature) and you have the very purest essence of the psychoanalytic doctrine".

Freud was criticized heavily for his belief that children from age 1 to 5 were sexual beings primarily motivated by sexual desire or Eros. From around age 6 to 10 they go into a latency period and from there return to interest in sexual things, or they sublimate their sexual desires into a yearning for other socially acceptable things. Surprisingly, that from birth humans are sexual creatures may be one thing Freud was right about.

In Freud's research into the unconscious mind he uncovered what Stafford calls 'screen memories'. On page 28 he writes, Freud's research "pointed to the possibility of large-scale seduction of infant daughters by their fathers". In time "Freud discovered that in the majority of cases these memories were what he came to call "screen memories": memories which corresponded not to events which had actually taken place but to fantasies of what in fact had never happened. They represented what the patient had feared or wished might happen, which had been at first consciously denied, and then unconsciously repressed to emerge in the course of analysis with a vividness and apparent reality indistinguishable in the patient's mind from other childhood memories which were capable of historical verification" Uncovering these false memories often relieve patients of their symptoms. The author discusses screen memories again on page 113. As I remember it, during the 1980's and 1990's, there were improbable arrests for child sexual abuse at daycare centers around the country. Perhaps prosecutors would have benefited by reading what Freud wrote about these cases. Perhaps they had benefited!

Freud believed medicine would eventually be capable of treating mental illness but until that time psychoanalysis held the best hope for treatment. Freud also believed that around half of mental illnesses, especially the most severe kinds, were for the most part untreatable. In the beginning of the chapter on neurosis Stafford-Clark claims he believes most mental illnesses are biologically based. Then, in perhaps contrast to this solitary statement, the entire chapter, and in the entire book, Stafford-Clark follows Freud and his beliefs that these are caused by unconscious processes and does not countermand Freud. When he disagrees with Freud, Stafford-Clark isn't shy about telling us. One has to assume Stafford-Clark, who was himself a psychoanalysis, for the most part does agree with Freud and his theories as to the causes of mental illness.

Stafford-Clark writes, concerning melancholia, "Freud concluded that there the ego is in fact mourning for somebody or something who has been lost or denied and with whom, once all investment of libido in that person or possibility has been withdrawn, the ego now identifies itself. 'I cannot have you any longer for myself, and so I will become you for myself. . .' But this unconscious mechanism is not enough to prevent the sense of outward loss. Not only must the lost object be abandoned and its image identified with the ego, but the lost object must become a bad object because it has been lost, otherwise its loss would be quite unbearable. (it could almost sound like a sports star traded to another team) It may have to be so bad an object that it no longer deserves to live. In these circumstances, the ego having taken this object into itself, or introjected it, then becomes victim to the super-ego which threatens, criticizes or punishes the ego in this situation unmercifully. In this way Freud explained the tremendous denigration and despair which is so characteristic a feature of severe depression. If contact with reality was finally broken, then this despair would be heightened and intensified by delusions, either of punishment to come or of self-destruction which must be inflicted" In other words we become the person we truly love, and then punish ourselves for the act of rejection. Perhaps the solution would be for the ego, or the ID, to somehow understand it is not the center of the universe and perhaps deserved to be rejected? Or would that bring on more melancholia?

Stafford writes, "the close relationship between homosexuality and paranoia was supported in Freud's view by the frequency with which paranoid delusions took the form of intense pathological jealousy of other people. A man might become jealous of his wife because his repressed homosexual impulses compelled him to deny that he did not want her, and for him to substitute the displaced projection that she did not want him and was therefore being unfaithful to him. As always, the price of compulsively maintained innocence can be delusional"

This view might be considered hatred or homophobia today. Freud felt the human mind was neutral toward sexuality. That the preferred sexual object and the preferred sexual act were something learned. Freud also felt the difficult path toward heterosexuality was something to be nurtured. And of course, within the family, Freud felt that the relationship between the child and the opposite sex parent was of most importance. And then of course, for the child to turn outward, toward another object, the affection he held for the opposite sex parent. Would be interesting to see what Freud would think about equal rights today. Perhaps his professional lively hood would depend on supporting them. In our own 'tolerant' times, we may be approaching a time where the human mind may see homosexuality as something equal to or just as worthy as heterosexuality identity. There are certainly marches for homosexuality, and continuing efforts to criminalize heterosexual expression. The challenge may be to encourage and publicize homosexual adoptions. Perhaps, this is where the central problem lies. Because he can't father/mother children, on some level the homosexual suspects that he is in a sense going to die? If adoptions can become common place or the norm, and homosexual expression can truly be given equal praise, because so much of mental illness is caught up in homosexuality, at least in Freud's view, this could be a liberating development in our society. Considering about half the population or more are on psychotropic drugs, it might not be a bad idea.

With equal rights and wholesale adoptions or more preferably sperm donation type of births, where does this leave 'men's rights'? Despite the national obsession with equality (for at least the last half Century) the only way to truly engender equality in our society is to give men an equal right to abortion. This would be a sort of forced equality, as a beginning. It would limit women to a role closer to that men play? And perhaps having women seeking the permission or the hand of men, in theory. Perhaps instead of men's rights (in our tolerant and equal society) the party that will be given rights will be the state, and the state will, not have the right to abort children but be required to abort them, unless both parents are married and are held financially accountable for raising the coming child?

Such a scenario might seem more likely in our country. There is, however, the possibility of some kind of reactionary or extremist backlash. One which will frown upon homosexuality and give men 'equal rights' (and perhaps not the state). Perhaps more likely still would be the first scenario coupled with a later Adolph Hitler type leader, a white male Ghandi, MLK or Malcolm X type, who would be empowered, whom some of the masses would be expect to identify with (even preventing their paranoia, possibly), and who would basically help those remaining at least feel better? The true fear is of the younger population actually. That in seeing what their future holds (by seeing what has become of the older population) they will rebel (and of course do so by believing or rationalizing they are rebelling in the name of that gone population)? It's hardly a fear for them, just something to account for. What better place to speculate on the future of civilization than a work on Freud? Anyway, this isn't a bad introduction to Freud. Which is to say it's an introduction to the workings of the human mind and it's relationship to civilization.

This was originally published around the late 60's or early 70's (the author has some interesting/quaint ideas about racism and as already noted about homosexuality). You won't learn the publication date by reading anything on this page. Apparently, they'd sell less books if you knew.
allegro
Has a book ever changed your life completely? This one did. I read it as a young teenager and it was like opening a door to liberty. It changed the way I thought by explaining to me how the mind operates. Freud has his detractors, but his one big gift to the world was to show people how the mind works. Ego, super-ego, id -- understand these three and you can become a different person. David Stafford-Clark, a major figure in British psychoanalysis who had his own TV show in the '50s, produced a clear and concise book that even a 14-year-old could understand. Read it; it may change your life.