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by Thomas Szasz

eBook Schizophrenia: The Sacred Symbol of Psychiatry download ISBN: 0815602243
Author: Thomas Szasz
Publisher: Syracuse University Publications in Continuing Education; Syracuse Univ P edition (January 1, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1637 kb
Fb2: 1266 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: docx rtf txt lit
Category: Medics
Subcategory: Medicine

Szasz argues that the word schizophrenia does not stand for a genuine disease, that psychiatry has invented the concept as a sacred symbol to justify the practice of locking up people against their will and treating them.

Szasz argues that the word schizophrenia does not stand for a genuine disease, that psychiatry has invented the concept as a sacred symbol to justify the practice of locking up people against their will and treating them with a variety of unwanted.

Szasz, Thomas Stephen, 1920-. symbol of psychiatry. neurosyphilis exerted on institutional psychiatry during the crucial first four decades of its existence that is, between 1900 aqd 1940

Szasz, Thomas Stephen, 1920-. neurosyphilis exerted on institutional psychiatry during the crucial first four decades of its existence that is, between 1900 aqd 1940.

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The Future of Psychiatry in America. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 14, Issue. New York: Basic Books, p 1005. 3 See, generally, Szasz, T. S. (1961) The Myth of Mental Illness: Foundations of a Theory of Personal Conduct. New York: Hoeber-Harper. 7 Kraepelin, E. (1917) One Hundred Years of Psychiatry (trans. by Baskin, Wade, 1962), pp 151-2. New York: Philosophical Library.

Szasz called schizophrenia "the sacred symbol of psychiatry" because those so labeled have long provided and .

Szasz called schizophrenia "the sacred symbol of psychiatry" because those so labeled have long provided and continue to provide justification for psychiatric theories, treatments, abuses, and reforms. The figure of the psychotic or schizophrenic person to psychiatric experts and authorities, according to Szasz, is analogous with the figure of the heretic or blasphemer to theological experts and authorities. According to Szasz, to understand the metaphorical nature of the term "disease" in psychiatry, one must first understand its literal meaning in the rest of medicine.

Items related to Schizophrenia: The Sacred Symbol of Psychiatry. Thomas Szasz is the author of over four hundred articles and nineteen books; among the most recent are The Therapeutic State: Psychiatry in the Mirror of Current Events and Insanity: The Idea and Its Consequences. Szasz, Thomas Schizophrenia: The Sacred Symbol of Psychiatry. ISBN 13: 9780815602248. Schizophrenia: The Sacred Symbol of Psychiatry. He was both a practicing psychiatrist and a professor of psychiatry at the Health Science Center, State University of New York, in Syracuse.

Szasz argues that the word schizophrenia does not stand for a genuine disease, that psychiatry has invented the concept as a sacred symbol to justify the practice of locking up people against their will and treating them with a variety of unwanted, unsolicited, and damaging interventions. Szasz argues that the word schizophrenia does not stand for a genuine disease, that psychiatry has invented the concept as a sacred symbol to justify the practice of locking up people against their will and treating them with a variety of unwanted, unsolicited, and damaging interventions.

Szasz once again lampoons his fellow psychiatrists in Schizophrenia: The Sacred Symbol of Psychiatry. He first details psychiatric history at the turn of the century and howthe discovery of paresis as a true disease lead them to use it as the paradigmfor all "mental illess.

Szasz argues that the word schizophrenia does not stand for a genuine disease, that psychiatry has invented the concept as a sacred symbol to justify the practice of locking up people against their will and treating them with a variety of unwanted, unsolicited, and damaging interventions.

Comments: (7)
Pumpit
It's Thomas Szasz...what more needs to be said! Arrived on-time and no issues with the book.
blodrayne
I purchased this back in the spring of 2014 since I wanted to see what he had to say about schizophrenia and it turned out to be a learning point for me after reading about half (or more) of the book. I think I should have rented the book instead of making a purchase. It turned me into a anti-psychiatry person way too fast and after reading about 70% of the book, I decided to put it down.

Psychiatry does have it's place. I know exactly where I stand on this issue (of psychiatry) and after reading this book it has opened up my eyes to how schizophrenia was "born" and came to be what it is today. . .having that knowledge is powerful. . .however it doesn't "flow" when you want to work in the mental health field as a therapist or social worker or even a peer support specialist.

This book lead me to search about the social nature of mental illness which is a book that I desire to read that book by Dr. Leonard Bowers. However, I am very aware how much Szasz feels about psychiatry and I'm not too sure how Dr. Bowers feels about the field. I must be careful if I am to read The Social Nature of Mental Illness. I am about helping people where they are at and helping them to heal . . .I'm not really big on psychiatry, but it does have it's place.
Tenius
A clear, insight into the pseudoscience of psychology/psychiatry. If you worship these then you will not agree with the author. Guess it depends on YOUR worldview.
Vut
a classic book
there's much to achieve in the practice in accordance with this book
we need to see the limitations of psyquiatry
Mr Freeman
My son is currently being forced into permanent drugs. Szasz has opened my eyes to the current situation in psychiatry. Thank you Thomas Szasz.
Siralune
Thomas Szasz (born 1920) is Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at the State University of New York Health Science Center. He is a well-known critic of psychiatry, of the social role of medicine in modern society, and is a social libertarian.

He states in the Preface to this 1976 book, "In this book I shall try to show how schizophrenia has become the Christ on the cross that psychiatrists worship ... and how our understanding of both psychiatry and schizophrenia may be advanced by approaching this 'diagnosis' as if it pointed to a religious symbol rather than to a medical disease."

Here are some representative quotations from the book:

"Real medicine thus helps real physicians to treat or cure real patients; fake medicine (psychiatry) helps fake physicians (psychiatrists) to influence or control fake patients (the mentally sick)."
"Briefly put, I have maintained that the intervention institutional psychiatrists call 'mental hospitalization' is, in fact, a form of imprisonment; that the imposition of such loss of liberty on innocent persons is immoral (and, in the United States, unconstitutional); and that the phenomenon psychiatrists call 'schizophrenia' is not a demonstrable medical disease but the name of certain kinds of social deviation (or of behavior unacceptable to the speaker)."
"But if all so-called mental disease is brain disease, if all mental disease is really only the 'mental symptom' of conditions such as paresis and pellagra---then it makes no sense to have two classes of brain diseases: one neurological, and the other mental. Instead, it would be necessary to insist ... that mental diseases are not diseases at all..."
"The greatest symbolic and social power of 'schizophrenia' lies precisely in its being inextricably tied to the idea of disease and the institution of medicine. Thus, an effort to offer a nonmedical model for schizophrenia is about as feasible, and futile, as would be the effort to offer a nontheological model for the Eucharist."
Xcorn
Prof. Thomas Szasz recognizes that so-called mental illness which are not based in actualMEDICAL pathology are "diseases" only by the analogic and metaphorical qualities of language. Prof. Sasz maintains that the mind is not the brain, the mental functions are not reducible to brain functions, and that so-called "mental diseases" are not disases but are refelctions and manifestations of the way persons deal with problems-in-living. Because of his respect for human dignity and human freedom, Szasz is a classical liberal whose writings are compatible with the freedom and liberty issues characteristic of the so-called "right wing" section of the political and spectrum. Szasz is incisive, pungent, brilliant, insightful on the role of the threaputic industry within the totalitarian state and the uses of psychiatric voodoo for control of persons and thought. Accordingly, he comes across as a spokesperson of the liberty-freedom perspective -- what Alice in Wonderland said is the same thing as love, namely, minding one's own business. AS Szasz, points out, the psychiatric concept of "disease" attempts to make the mind, will and emotions a material object which supposedly can be "treated". His view of human freedom shapes his view of politics. The "mental" illness are social constructions in the form of political arrangments for exerting power over other beings -- exactly what the Totalitarlian Left sets itself to accomplish with self-rightous vigor. The various functional mental illness are real behaviors, but they are that, behaviors, not diseases or "symptoms" of "disease". Statists, who begin with an ethic of control, tend to oppose Szazian thought. Szasz, who does not begin with a political platform, does article values of freedom and recognition of the religious and ideological nature of psychiatric voodoo, does make conclusions which are favorable to human freedom rather than to a global psychiatric ward. Prof. Szasz presents is one of the foremost, perhaps the foremost challenge to the theology of psychiatry and the efforts of that psychiatry to subject mankind to its impirmatur.