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eBook The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence: Introduced Infectious Diseases and Population Decline among Northwest Indians, 1774-1874 download

by Boyd

eBook The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence: Introduced Infectious Diseases and Population Decline among Northwest Indians, 1774-1874 download ISBN: 0295978376
Author: Boyd
Publisher: University of Washington Press; First Edition edition (November 1, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 428
ePub: 1877 kb
Fb2: 1613 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mobi azw doc docx
Category: Medics
Subcategory: Medicine

Great book about the history of the NW Coast epidemics. Very informative and easy to read. Excellent study to the demography of the pacific northwest natives. Boyd did an enormous job, which should be appreciated.

Great book about the history of the NW Coast epidemics. Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase. An important addition to native american studies. One person found this helpful.

Boyd's book is very useful in that it gives detailed reconstructions of the spread of diseases on the Northwest Coast between 1774 and 1874, and it. .

Boyd's book is very useful in that it gives detailed reconstructions of the spread of diseases on the Northwest Coast between 1774 and 1874, and it presents intriguing qualitative evidence about the effects of these diseases upon the Natives of that region and about the responses of those people to these scourges.

As we learn in The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence, the 1770s smallpox epidemic would be.Pestilence is a story of decline, not just of population, but of culture. Boyd notes that epidemics forced Indians to abandon their villages and reformulate residential patterns and kinship ties.

As we learn in The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence, the 1770s smallpox epidemic would be the first offensive in a vicious and lopsided one-hundred years' war initiated by microorganisms against "epidemiologically virgin" populations whose immune systems (and cultural systems) could offer little resistance.

The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence examines the introduction of infectious diseases among the Indians of the Northwest Coast culture area (present-day Oregon and Washington west of the Cascade Mountains, British Columbia west of the Coast Range, and southeast Alaska) i.

The emphasis is on epidemic diseases and specific epidemic episodes. In most parts of the Americas, disease transfer and depopulation occurred early and are poorly documented.

Robert T. Boyd, The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence: Introduced Infectious Diseases and Population Decline among Northwest Coast Indians. page 132. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 1999. a b Pritzker 173. ^ Pritzker 174.

1774–1874, Seattle, University of Washington Press; Vancouver, UBC Press, 1999, pp. xv, 403, illus.

Robert Boyd, The coming of the spirit of pestilence: introduced infectious diseases and population decline among Northwest Coast Indians, 1774–1874, Seattle, University of Washington Press; Vancouver, UBC Press, 1999, pp. Robert Boyd, The coming of the spirit of pestilence: introduced infectious diseases and population decline among Northwest Coast Indians, 1774–1874, Seattle, University of Washington Press; Vancouver, UBC Press, 1999, pp. Volume 45, Issue 3. Anne Hardy (a1).

The coming of the spirit of pestilence: introduced infectious diseases and population decline among Northwest . Diary of David Zeisberger: a Moravian missionary among the Indians of Ohio. St. Clair Shores: Scholarly Press.

The coming of the spirit of pestilence: introduced infectious diseases and population decline among Northwest Coast Indians, 1774–1874. Seattle: University of Washington Press. The Wiechquaeskeck Indians of southwestern Connecticut in the seventeenth century. Bowie: Heritage Books. About the Jehovah's Witnesses Christian denomination - Past opposition to vaccinations, religioustolerance. Livio, Susan K. "Nearly 9,000 . school children skipped vaccinations on religious grounds last year". Retrieved 2015-03-11. "Outbreak of Measles Among Christian Science Students – Missouri and Illinois, 1994".

Jackson, John C. Children of the Fur Trade: Forgotten Metis of the Pacific Northwest. Missoula: Mountain Press Pub. C. 1995.

The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence: Introduced Infectious Diseases and Population Decline among Northwest coast Indians, 1774-1874. Vancouver: UBC Press, 1999. Jones & Son, printers, 1868. Jackson, John C. Northwest Coast Indian Land and Life.

Introduced Infectious Diseases and Population Decline among Northwest Coast Indians, 1774-1874.

The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence : Introduced Infectious Diseases and Population Decline among Northwest Coast Indians, 1774-1874.

In the late 1700s, when Euro-Americans began to visit the Northwest Coast, they reported the presence of vigorous, diverse cultures?among them the Tlingit, Haida, Kwakwaka?wakw (Kwakiutl), Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka), Coast Salish, and Chinookans?with a population conservatively estimated at over 180,000. A century later only about 35,000 were left. The change was brought about by the introduction of diseases that had originated in the Eastern Hemisphere, such as smallpox, malaria, measles, and influenza.

The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence examines the introduction of infectious diseases among the Indians of the Northwest Coast culture area (present-day Oregon and Washington west of the Cascade Mountains, British Columbia west of the Coast Range, and southeast Alaska) in the first century of contact and the effects of these new diseases on Native American population size, structure, interactions, and viability. The emphasis is on epidemic diseases and specific epidemic episodes.

In most parts of the Americas, disease transfer and depopulation occurred early and are poorly documented. Because of the lateness of Euro-American contact in the Pacific Northwest, however, records are relatively complete, and it is possible to reconstruct in some detail the processes of disease transfer and the progress of specific epidemics, compute their demographic impact, and discern connections between these processes and culture change.

Boyd provides a thorough compilation, analysis, and comparison of information gleaned from many published and archival sources, both Euro-American (trading-company, mission, and doctors? records; ships? logs; diaries; and Hudson?s Bay Company and government censuses) and Native American (oral traditions and informant testimony). The many quotations from contemporary sources underscore the magnitude of the human suffering. The Coming of the Spirit of Pestilence is a definitive study of introduced diseases in the Pacific Northwest.

For more information on the author go to http://roberttboyd.com/

Comments: (3)
Xangeo
Great book about the history of the NW Coast epidemics. Very informative and easy to read.
Weernis
Excellent study to the demography of the pacific northwest natives. Boyd did an enormous job, which should be appreciated. An important addition to native american studies.
Acrobat
I didn't buy this, so I'm not a verified reader, I got it from the library.
Some people may be put off by some of the language in the book which can be considered by some to be less respectful of First Nations than we expect today, but it was written almost 20 years ago and is a very important, thorough documentation of the impact of disease on First Nations.
I have known for a long time that First Nations were decimated by disease but this book really brings it home. One epidemic after another after another after another. Boyd presents what happened as objectively as possible and lets the read know the uncertainties. He neither wallows in guilt nor avoids uncomfortable truths. A well written book that not only upholds academic standards but is readable by everyone.
Must reading for anyone who wants to understand what happened to Native America and why.