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by Carter Heyward

eBook When Boundaries Betray Us: Beyond Illusions of What Is Ethical in Therapy and Life download ISBN: 0060638958
Author: Carter Heyward
Publisher: Harpercollins; 1st edition (November 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1657 kb
Fb2: 1881 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mbr lrf lrf mobi
Category: Medics
Subcategory: Medicine

I loved "When Boundaries Betray U. For one thing, it's one of the freshest subject matters I've ever encountered. Heyward wants to explore other ways of relating with Elizabeth Farro. Her life is in a shambles because it's not allowed

I loved "When Boundaries Betray U. I'm glad to see some creativity in the stale world of publishing, where every other book I read seems familiar. For another, it works on many levels. Her life is in a shambles because it's not allowed. And, yet, despite my appreciation of new approaches and alternative theologies, I'm not sure about Heyward's thesis. Her feelings for Farro seem unhealthy.

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In When Boundaries Betray Us, feminist theologian and ethicist Carter Heyward delivers a lightning bolt reality check to this prevailing system of values. Drawing on her own traumatic experiences in therapy, Heyward exposes how the rigidly applied boundaries of the professional relationship can be fear-based, artificial constructs that stand in the way of true healing and our right-relation to one another as people.

Betray Us : Beyond Illustrations of What is Ethical in Therapy and Life Rather, the issues were informed consent - therapy clients should be properly notified of what may happen to them, emotionally an. .

When Boundaries Betray Us : Beyond Illustrations of What is Ethical in Therapy and Life. In effect, "Elizabeth" turned up the heat, found she couldn't take it, and ran out of the kitchen, leaving her client in hell.

Boundaries: What Happens to the Disabled Poor When Insurers Draw a Line Between What's "Medically Necessary" and Devices That Can Improve Quality of Life?

Bibliographic Citation. San Francisco: HarperSan Francisco, 1993. Boundaries: What Happens to the Disabled Poor When Insurers Draw a Line Between What's "Medically Necessary" and Devices That Can Improve Quality of Life?  Iezzoni, Lisa (1999-11). Related Items in Google Scholar.

carter heyward has - miriam greenspan. Betray beyond illusions of. What. Printed in the United No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner what-. soever without written permission except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles.

When Boundaries Betray Us: Beyond Illusions of What is Ethical in Therapy and Life. The Redemption of God: A Theology of Mutual Relation. University Press of America, 1982; published 1986 by Kruz Verlag, Stuttgart, Germany as Und Sie Rührte Sein Kleide auf, with foreword by Dorothee S�lle; excerpts published and discussed by Luce Irigaray in Le Souffle des Femmes, Paris, 1996. A Priest Forever: Formation of a Woman and a Priest. Harper and Row, 1976; to be republished, with New Introduction, 1999.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for When Boundaries Betray Us: Beyond Illusions of.HarperCollins Publishers (Australia) Pty Ltd. Date of Publication.

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When boundaries betray us: Beyond illusions of what is ethical in therapy and life. The book shows professionals how to apply a social and family systems-based approach to assessment and intervention with diverse families

When boundaries betray us: Beyond illusions of what is ethical in therapy and life. New York: HarperSanFransico. The book shows professionals how to apply a social and family systems-based approach to assessment and intervention with diverse families. It also describes new programs in this area, and discusses both established and emerging intervention strategies. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

Presenting a provocative new attitude toward the role of intimacy in healing, the author of Touching Our Strength examines the traditional boundaries between therapist and patient and argues that such boundaries must be transcended to promote true healing.
Comments: (6)
Tcaruieb
I loved "When Boundaries Betray Us." For one thing, it's one of the freshest subject matters I've ever encountered. I'm glad to see some creativity in the stale world of publishing, where every other book I read seems familiar. For another, it works on many levels. It is partly a mystery (what exactly went on between Heyward and her therapist?) and partly a deconstruction of western therapy, as well as an analysis of relational theology.

Let me say from the outset, I have no idea what happened between "Elizabeth Farro" and Carter Heyward. The author is highly biased by her own interpretation (the writing is at times almost comically one-sided)-- that they fell in love and were blocked from being friends by the structures of clinical therapy. Based on what I've read, I think there are other plausible alternatives, including that this was merely an unrequited love situation that got out of hand. Dr. Farro may have simply gotten tired of Heyward's fantasies and a cutoff came as a last resort.

Heyward uses her experiences as a way of deconstructing therapy and theology. The limited Western perspective doesn't allow a relationship like the one between Heyward and Farro to thrive. Therapist and patient can't be friends, people who are "in love" can only be lovers (impeded by Heyward's longterm relationship). Heyward wants to explore other ways of relating with Elizabeth Farro. Her life is in a shambles because it's not allowed.

And, yet, despite my appreciation of new approaches and alternative theologies, I'm not sure about Heyward's thesis. Her feelings for Farro seem unhealthy. Since they occurred during a time when she was giving up drinking and compulsive eating, I'm inclined to think she may have just been channeling one obsession through another. Then there is the issue of Heyward's longterm lover, who complains of feeling like "the wallpaper." If Heyward is serious about mutuality, her neglect of her lover is alarming. Instead she seems merely obsessed with something she can't have. I'm not sure that is either psychologically or theologically sound.

There are also problems with the writing. Heyward does not sufficiently paint Elizabeth Farro as a three dimensional person; I was hard pressed to understand why anyone would be drawn to her. There isn't enough between them (as depicted in the text) to merit the gravity of the topic. Heyward wants us to sympathize with her side, even to the point of desiring institutional reform, but I was left feeling that it was a blessing that Elizabeth Farro was out of her life. Their relationship was not healthy, and I don't think there was a lot of love there.
Rleillin
This book attempts to address two separate issues as one. I find the arguments about "boundaries" less compelling than what Heyward reveals about herself. As a psychotherapist, I believe "Elizabeth" made glaring mistakes (she should have referred Carter to another therapist early on). But Carter's narcissistic focus on "friendship" outstrips any clarity. She blithely sends frequent letters to Elizabeth, despite a request not to contact her again; she doesn't consider that Elizabeth might not choose her as a friend (I wouldn't), boundaries aside; she ignores that while therapists are hopefully fulfilled by their work, it's not intended to be a reciprocal relationship. I love my work, but if Carter Heyward were my patient, she'd drive ME crazy!
Kalv
Good book
Dont_Wory
When a woman writes a book from a perspective of a wounded client who exhibits such narcissistic tendencies (if not full blown pathology), and parades how out of touch, demanding and unwilling or unable to work through her therapy she is, and then attempts to justify her own inability to connect with her deeper self, it just seems sad. It is also a gross injustice to the analytic and therapeutic communities and their understandings of what the real inner work is about. While reading Carter's book all I could think of was why didn't her so called 'meaningful' relationships manage to see through her acting out and assist her in shifting to the inner drama she was attempting to act out once more with a therapist. The analytic literature (especially Schwartz-Salant and Johnson's books on Narcissism) clearly articulates the stages of inner work that Carter consistently attempted to avoid through her displacement of her unsatisfied needs onto her therapeutic relationship. I would love to hear Elizabeth's side of the journey, for I suspect she knew and was unwilling to collude in another "violent" relationship that would duplicate the unsatisfying inner relationship that Carter both demands and wants replicated. I suspect down the road, if she ever manages to break through the narcissistic 'split' and quits displacing her 'empty holes' onto spirituality, political patriarchy etc., she will arrive at a much different appreciation of how her therapist did exactly what was needed to invite Carter into her own self's drama, and it was Carter's inability to hold that tension that led to her termination. Oh how terribly sad.