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eBook Lyme Disease: The Ecology of a Complex System download

by Richard Ostfeld

eBook Lyme Disease: The Ecology of a Complex System download ISBN: 0195388127
Author: Richard Ostfeld
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 10, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 232
ePub: 1385 kb
Fb2: 1652 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf lrf doc docx
Category: Medics
Subcategory: Medicine

Lyme Disease: The Ecology. has been added to your Cart.

Lyme Disease: The Ecology. It is very well written, with occasional wry asides, and the content is both important and fascinating. It is also a story of scientific mistakes such as oversimplification and poor experimental design, and unscientific attachment to simple explanations which then become dogma.

Ostfeld Richard (EN). Most human diseases come from nature, from pathogens that live and breed in non-human animals and are accidentally transmitted to us. Human illness is only the culmination of a complex series of interactions among species in their natural habitats. To avoid exposure to these pathogens, we must understand which species are involved, what regulates their abundance, and how they interact. Lyme disease affects the lives of millions of people in the US, Europe, and Asia.

Lyme Disease The Ecology of a Complex System (Hardback) Ostfeld, Richard Oxford Academ 9780195388121 : What increases Lyme disease risk, what decreases it, why are there hotspots and bad years. This book explores why deer are less important to Lyme disease than most people think, why acorns are in fact important, and why biodiversityreduces risk of exposure, and explains how the science of ecology can help protect human health.

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Request PDF On Apr 1, 2012, Maria Diuk-Wasser and others published Lyme Disease: The Ecology of a Complex .

New Biological Books. Human Biology and Health. Lyme Disease: The Ecology of a Complex System. By Richard S. Ostfeld. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. xiii + 216 . il. index.

2 Of A Complex System - Richard Ostfeld b. .

Most human diseases come from nature, from pathogens that live and breed in non-human animals and are "accidentally" transmitted to us. Human illness is only the culmination of a complex series of interactions among species in their natural habitats. To avoid exposure to these pathogens, we must understand which species are involved, what regulates their abundance, and how they interact. Lyme disease affects the lives of millions of people in the US, Europe, and Asia. It is the most frequently reported vector-borne disease in the United States; About 20,000 cases have been reported each year over the past five years, and tens of thousands more go unrecognized and unreported. Despite the epidemiological importance of understanding variable LD risk, such pursuit has been slow, indirect, and only partially successful, due in part to an overemphasis on identifying the small subset of 'key players' that contribute to Lyme disease risk, as well as a general misunderstanding of effective treatment options. This controversial book is a comprehensive, synthetic review of research on the ecology of Lyme disease in North America. It describes how humans get sick, why some years and places are so risky and others not. It challenges dogma - for instance, that risk is closely tied to the abundance of deer - and replaces it with a new understanding that embraces the complexity of species and their interactions. It describes why the place where Lyme disease emerged - coastal New England - set researchers on mistaken pathways. It shows how tiny acorns have enormous impacts on our probability of getting sick, why biodiversity is good for our health, why living next to a small woodlot is dangerous, and why Lyme disease is an excellent model system for understanding many other human and animal diseases. Intended for an audience of professional and student ecologists, epidemiologists, and other health scientists, it is written in an informal style accessible also to non-scientists interested in human health and conservation.
Comments: (7)
Anayaron
This profoundly experienced researcher offers a definitive study of all aspects of the major vectors, environments, and animals involved with Lyme diease.

His analogies are superior.

His summary of all major studies is highly readable but does not compromise depth.

Anyone interested in preventing Lyme disease in their community, or who is involved in land care or actions impacting any natural setting as an official in a local, state or federal agency, or those involved in zoning new areas of non-urban land, should read this book.

Further, people looking to relocate or move to areas that are pondering their risk of vector illnesses, like the many new fatal Hanta virus forms throughout all the America's, or tick infections like Lyme disease, Babesia, prolific Bartonella, etc. might find this very useful.

He is also an interesting teacher of the ways we are exposed, and why we are more exposed beyond basic 1990 causes--mice and deer numbers.

Golfers, gardeners and others working in fields, pastures or woods, who like reading at a college level, will find this of use.
Mananara
This is the best book on disease transmission that
I have read since I left medical school 32 years ago. I have personally lived through the failures of a reductionist approach to medicine. If we embrace the ecological wisdom contained in this book, we will improve our odds of surviving the post-antibiotic era of evolving superbugs.

The book also provides powerful support for the central place of ecology in planning environmental protection or remediation. It is filled with cautionary tales about the failures of "shoot from the hip" environmental interventions based on inadequate understanding of the complex ecologies of diseases. In an age that relies increasingly on social media supported self-selected silos of mutually reinforcing prejudices, this book is a refreshing silo buster. Understanding anything of importance requires a tolerance for complexity. Action in a world of complexity requires deep understanding. This book delivers on deep understanding of an amazingly context-dependent disease transmission system.

Finally, this book is well-written, logically consistent, and pulls the reader along like a well constructed murder mystery. It achieves the rare trifecta of science reporting: accurate, informative and entertaining. This is a great read!
Kelezel
A rigorous and careful analysis of the Lyme disease ecosystem in eastern and central North America, this book is accessible to lay people who are familiar with scientific research. It is very well written, with occasional wry asides, and the content is both important and fascinating. It is also a story of scientific mistakes such as oversimplification and poor experimental design, and unscientific attachment to simple explanations which then become dogma. While Ostfeld shows some understanding of why the narrative of Lyme disease research has played out this way, he is very clear in his call for better-informed experimental design. Ostfeld's goal is to understand what causes Lyme disease to emerge and spread, so that we are in a better position to mitigate disease risk -- for other emerging infectious diseases as well as Lyme.

A few examples of insights from the book:
- The tick that carries Lyme disease is not the "deer tick," which doesn't exist as a separate species, but the blacklegged tick. Further, this tick is a host generalist and is not a specialist on white-tailed deer. This has enormous implications for both research and risk mitigation.
- Tick populations and Lyme disease are not closely coupled with dense deer populations.
- Lyme disease is sometimes absent in areas with abundant blacklegged ticks and white-tailed deer, which indicates that other factors are playing a significant role.
- White-footed mice are the easiest host mammals to catch and to inspect for immature blacklegged ticks, but other hosts are significant as well.
- Four small mammals (including white-footed mice) host 50% of ticks, but account for 90% of infected ticks. That means that all the other possible hosts account for only 10% of infected ticks. Since ticks take only one blood meal at each stage of life, infection prevalence depends on the composition of host species.
- In areas with lots of oak trees, acorn production (which leads to a population explosion of mice and chipmunks) is an excellent leading indicator of the ecological risk of human exposure to Lyme disease.
- Biodiversity, which depends on intact habitats, is a critical factor in Lyme disease risk.
- When a system is complex (as the Lyme disease ecosystem is), you cannot understand it via reductionist, simplistic models.

Throughout, and at the end of the book, Ostfeld discusses other zoonotic diseases, such as SARS, West Nile, and hantavirus.

What makes this book compelling is a combination of good science, clear writing, skilled explanations of the functioning of complex systems, and good choices of supporting graphics.

The result is a fascinating book, especially given the density and rigor of the material.
Rias
An excellent book, by a master of research on Lyme and related diseases. Looks at causes, which reveal tactics to reduce risk of contracting.
Talrajas
This is laboriously researched ... Read it. Lyme Does have natural controls. .... Wild turkeys snd Guinea fowl... Both eat ticks because they groom their plumage ....!!!
Morad
This is important reading for anyone interested in the health of our human-nature ecosystem. Ostfeld meticulously examines scientific efforts to understand and control the lyme outbreak. In this book is the sorry tale of scientific blunders. But Ostfeld nurtures a steady stream of insights from his own and others work. Please have patience with the plodding pace of this book. It is worth reading and acting on.
Angana
Well written. A bit dry as it is at times scientific in nature, but if you are looking for the facts, this is the book for you!
This book made quite a seemingly boring subject into something incredibly interesting from an anthropological and ecological view point. Plan on reading it again!