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by Richard A. Posner,Tomas J. Philipson

eBook Private Choices and Public Health: The AIDS Epidemic in an Economic Perspective download ISBN: 0674707389
Author: Richard A. Posner,Tomas J. Philipson
Publisher: Harvard University Press (January 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1569 kb
Fb2: 1377 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc lrf txt azw
Category: Medics
Subcategory: Medicine

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The AIDS Epidemic in an Economic Perspective. Recognizing that the transmission of the AIDS virus is a consequence of private choices-rational and often informed-to engage in risky conduct, the authors employ tools of economic analysis to reassess the orthodox approach to AIDS by the public health community. Standard predictions of the spread of AIDS, the authors argue, are questionable because they ignore rational behavioral response to the risk of infection.

It is a welcome and crucial perspective. It is an exceptional approach and a brilliant contribution by Philipson and Posner. Today's policy debates would be well served if the authors would apply their insight and intelligence to the myriad of social concerns which have become engulfed in the political and emotional myasma which inhibits a rational understanding of issues.

'Economics Without Money; Sex Without Gender'' critiques Tomas Philipson and Richard Posner's model of sexual ''trades'', which argues that ''market'' mechanisms will be largely sufficient to control the AIDS epidemic. As feminist economists have pointed out, such models rest upon strong assumptions regarding the availability of information, the partners' egotism, the absence of extra-economic coercion, and the ability of all parties to exit the market. Like other dangerous but pleasurable activities, such as downhill skiing and mountain climbing, engaging in unprotected sex implicitly involves the weighing of costs and benefits.

Private and Public Resources Impacts on the Development of Global Perspective in China. The nal Principles in Public Private Partnerships in the Framework of Human Rights. Yuen-Hang Ng, Raymond K. H. Chan, Min Hu. DOI: 1. 236/jss. 69004 233 Downloads 438 Views Citations. Ma. Enriqueta Mancilla Rendón.

1993) do in Private Choices and Public Health: The AIDS Epidemic in Perspective, that there is no need for policy .

1993) do in Private Choices and Public Health: The AIDS Epidemic in Perspective, that there is no need for policy intervention and that the private market will. solve the problem on its own and generate an optimal level of HIV. infection. The company's management of costs incurred due to HIV/AIDS is critically assessed from the perspective of financial sustainability, using an AIDS Projection Model developed by Matthews (200713. Computational modelling of the impact of AIDS on business. AIDS, 21(Supplement 3): S91–7. View all references).

Like other dangerous but pleasurable activities, such as downhill skiing and mountain climbing, engaging in unprotected sex implicitly involves the weighing of costs and benefits. Recognizing that the transmission of the AIDS virus is a consequence of private choices―rational and often informed―to engage in risky conduct, the authors employ tools of economic analysis to reassess the orthodox approach to AIDS by the public health community.

Standard predictions of the spread of AIDS, the authors argue, are questionable because they ignore rational behavioral response to the risk of infection. For the same reason, customary recommended public health measures, such as extensive testing for the AIDS virus, not only may be ineffective in controlling the spread of the disease but may actually cause it to spread more rapidly. The authors examine regulatory measures and proposals such as mandatory testing, criminal punishments, and immigration controls, as well as the subsidization of AIDS education and medical research, the social and fiscal costs of AIDS, the political economy of the government's response, and the interrelation of AIDS and fertility risk.

Neither liberal nor conservative, yet on the whole skeptical about governmental involvement in the epidemic, this book is certain to be controversial, but its injection of hard-headed economic thinking into the AIDS debate is long overdue. Although Private Choices and Public Health is accessible to the interested general reader, it will also capture the attention of economists―especially those involved in health issues―epidemiologists, public health workers, lawyers, and specialists in sexual behavior and drug addiction.