carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » A Nurse's Story: Life, Death and In-between in an Intensive Care Unit

eBook A Nurse's Story: Life, Death and In-between in an Intensive Care Unit download

by Tilda Shalof

eBook A Nurse's Story: Life, Death and In-between in an Intensive Care Unit download ISBN: 0771080867
Author: Tilda Shalof
Publisher: McClelland & Stewart; First Edition first Printing edition (2004)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1572 kb
Fb2: 1995 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf doc azw mobi
Category: Medics
Subcategory: Medicine

A Nurse's Story book. The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as Laura’s Line

A Nurse's Story book. The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as Laura’s Line. They were a bit wild: smart, funny, disrespectful of authority, but also caring and incredibly committed to their jobs. Laura set the tone with her quick remarks. Frances, from Newfoundland, was famous for her improvised recip The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as Laura’s Line.

Tilda Shalof's A Nurse's Story is the first time the work of nurses has been documented in print in Canada in such an. .From the Inside Flap. The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as "Laura's Line.

Shalof has seen it all, and writes about it, to. -The Calgary Herald. Frances, from Newfoundland, was famous for her improvised recipes.

The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as Laura’s Line. Working in the ICU was both emotionally grueling and physically exhausting. Many patients, quite simply, were dying, and the staff strove mightily to prolong their lives. With their skill, dedication, and the resources of modern science, they sometimes were almost too successful.

An intensive care unit nurse with twenty years of experience in Israel and Canada, Tilda Shalof now lives in Toronto. Her honesty is a great positive in A Nurse's Story. For instance while she relays how some viewed her as too sensitive, for a patient that can be a welcome character trait in an uncertain world. A Nurse's Story should be read by anyone considering nursing as a profession, for those in nursing, and for anyone who wonders what goes into the care of really sick people. It helped me understand what nurses endure and how they cope. As if the ICU nurse wasn't already high on my respect list, A Nurse's Story pushed it higher.

Tilda Shalof is an intensive care unit nurse with twenty years of experience in Israel, New York, and Canada. Life-Flight-Teams are called to transport those in need of critical medical care to an institution capable of managing their condition. On occasion, life-alteri. Written by a coworker. Nurse Stories S Stories Nursing Books Icu Nursing Nursing Career Intensive Care Unit Nonfiction Books Books To Read Good Books.

A Nurses Story Tilda Shalof 077108771080876 The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as Lauras Line

A Nurses Story Tilda Shalof 077108771080876 The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as Lauras Line. They were a bit wild: smart, fu. A Nurses Story Tilda Shalof 077108771080876 The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as Lauras Line.

The nurses in Lives in the Balance possess years of clinical experience in pediatric and adult care and a wealth of.In the ICU, death is an ever-present possibility. Sarah Burns tells an unsentimental but moving story of the end of one man’s life.

The nurses in Lives in the Balance possess years of clinical experience in pediatric and adult care and a wealth of expertise in medical, surgical, cardiac, cardiovascular, trauma, and neurosurgical units. However, it’s neither the population they serve, nor the medical specialty, that defines them. After Cecilia Fulton witnessed too many distressing end-of-life situations where her patients suffered deaths that were undignified and overly technologized, she made the decision to leave the ICU.

Excerpted from A Nurse’s Story: Life, Death and In-Between in an Intensive Care Unit. Published by McClelland & Stewart Ltd. Reproduced by arrangement with the publisher. Post Views: 179. Be the first to get new content, exclusive features and great discounts from the Scrubs Mag team.

The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-­city .

The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-­city hospital was known as "Laura's Line. " They were a bit wild: smart, funny, disrespectful of authority, but also caring and incredibly committed to their jobs. Justine, the union rep, wore t-­shirts emblazoned with defiant slogans, like "Nurses Care But It's Not in the Budget. " Shalof was the one who had been to university

A Nurse’s Story is Tilda’s part memoir, part thought-provoking discussion about her life as a Canadian Intensive Care Unit nurse .

A Nurse’s Story is Tilda’s part memoir, part thought-provoking discussion about her life as a Canadian Intensive Care Unit nurse and the challenges and rewards that come with the job. The book also tells heart-breaking stories and far rarer triumphs that come with working in the ICU. Through it all, Tilda makes you feel as though you are right. INDEX 0:00 Intro and Background of the Book 1:51 Why Did I Become a Critical Care Nurse? 9:25 Starting Out in the ICU 28:37 Family and Friendships, How they can and cannot support you 33:15 LIfe in the ICU 42:21 Emotional Detachment 46:31 Choosing Life or Death: Decisions of a Patient and a Family 50:52 Outro and End of Season 1.

The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as “Laura’s Line.” They were a bit wild: smart, funny, disrespectful of authority, but also caring and incredibly committed to their jobs. Laura set the tone with her quick remarks. Frances, from Newfoundland, was famous for her improvised recipes. Justine, the union rep, wore t-shirts emblazoned with defiant slogans, like “Nurses Care But It’s Not in the Budget.” Shalof was the one who had been to university. The others accused her of being “sooo sensitive.”They depended upon one another. Working in the ICU was both emotionally grueling and physically exhausting. Many patients, quite simply, were dying, and the staff strove mightily to prolong their lives. With their skill, dedication, and the resources of modern science, they sometimes were almost too successful. Doctors and nurses alike wondered if what they did for terminally-ill patients was not, in some cases, too extreme. A number of patients were admitted when it was too late even for heroic measures. A boy struck down by a cerebral aneurysm in the middle of a little-league hockey game. A woman rescued – too late – from a burning house. It all took its toll on the staff.And yet, on good days, they thrived on what they did. Shalof describes a colleague who is managing a “crashing” patient: “I looked at her. Nicky was flushed with excitement. She was doing five different things at the same time, planning ahead for another five. She was totally focused, in her element, in control, completely at home with the chaos. There was a huge smile on her face. Nurses like to fix things. If they can.”Shalof, a veteran ICU nurse, reveals what it is really like to work behind the closed hospital curtains. The drama, the sardonic humour, the grinding workload, the cheerful camaraderie, the big issues and the small, all are brought vividly to life in this remarkable book.From the Hardcover edition.
Comments: (7)
Ariurin
What a pleasant surprise to discover this gem of a book. Truly written and not to "smooth" so that you know this is a real person writing. As a member of the profession I found that Tilda presented many of the things we often feel and struggle with, and that our leaders tend to miss. Working in a socialized medical system, the same dilemmas arise all over the workd and are no defferent in Canada than in Israel, England, or elsewhwere. The only difference may be in the way that each society chooses to address them or resolve them. and the bottom line is that we as nurses are the ones who have to implement the decisions, whether they are to our liking or not. We have not chosen an easy profession. I felt that Tilda had the courage to say many of the things that I feel, and that are not acceptable in the modern world. Yes, I choose to care for people even when they are revolting to me as a person. I believe, as Tilda appears to, that learning to accept them and to exercise compassion is of the essence in our profession. And with these acts we also grow as humand and nurses/
Loved it and would recommend it to anyone who asked.
Sermak Light
Every nurse should read this book because it is good to know that you are not alone. You are not the only person who desires to help. You are not the only person who feels inadequate, at times. You are not the only person who second guesses yourself. You are not the only person who has ever wondered, "Why?" As a retired nurse who has faced burnout several times over in my career, I understand how that cycle works. I also learned about rejuvenation from burnout. The conclusion I draw from this book is this: Nursing is more than a job, a career or even a profession. Nursing is a way of looking at both life and death from the physical to the spiritual and back again. I am grateful for the years and experiences I've had; however, I will only return as called by the needs of my immediate family and closest friends. Nursing is a precious and painful gift.
Malhala
I enjoyed Tilda's book very much. As a kid growing up, I had many surgeries on my right leg. Even back then, as young as I was, I noticed how busy all the nurses were. I had Hip Replacement surgery in Feb. 02. As a grown-up, I can really appreciate and understand just how dedicated these men and women are to the nursing profession. Read this book! You will see just how demanding and difficult both mentally and emotionally, this job can be. Lastly, I would like to say Thank-you to all the nurses who took such good care of me when I was hospitalized years ago.
Captain America
With less than a year working on a grueling medical/surgical unit and with aspirations of becoming a critical care nurse, Shalof's book lays out for me in black and white what we go through at the bedside and beyond. She has become the mentor I've yet to find and she makes me proud to be a nurse.

The book is riveting and well written and I know everyone in it - even though I practice in the Southwest United States and she in Ontario. We all know all of these patients and their families and we all have our own lives and our own families to deal with. Shalof shares herself in an unimaginably honest way and she opens the doors to the nursing field's triumphs, frustrations, political absurdities, and the educational disparities found within. She's taught me a lot with this book and has validated many of my own feelings as a new nurse.

I sped through this book and am now reading her next book, "The Making of a Nurse," where she delves more deeply into her own personal life, her nursing stint in Israel, and on through her registry jobs and back to the ICU. All of it incredibly honest, however, I wish she would have, or could have, maybe mentioned some of her early nursing mistakes - she must have made some. I can understand why in the litigious society we live in and I'm sure she doesn't want to scare patients, but it would be helpful for those of us who are still wet behind the ears to know how a real nurse handled real mistakes and how she overcame them, learned from them, and went on to become the seemingly great nurse she is.

Five Stars - Well Deserved!
Shalizel
Being a nurse who is now retired & worked 40+ years in the profession, I can empathize with Tilda! I worked nearly every day with staffing issues, too many patients, not enough help & MD's that felt they were gods! We had trouble with a lot of MD's (thankfully not ALL) that wouldn't listen to us, and would then "question" what we were telling them! They spent - for the most part - a very short time with the patient, and we were there 12+ hours/day! Anyway, am enjoying the book & reliving my time at work. I worked with some of the best nurses who really CARED about their patients & co-workers, and we worked as a team! Throw in the RT's, CNA's, PT's, housekeeping, etc. and that made it good.