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eBook Falling Into the Fire: A Psychiatrist's Encounters with the Mind in Crisis download

by Christine Montross

eBook Falling Into the Fire: A Psychiatrist's Encounters with the Mind in Crisis download ISBN: 1594203938
Author: Christine Montross
Publisher: Penguin Press; 1 edition (August 1, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1402 kb
Fb2: 1778 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr azw lit lrf
Category: Medics
Subcategory: Medicine

No part of this book may be reproduced, scanned, or distributed in any printed or electronic form without permission.

No part of this book may be reproduced, scanned, or distributed in any printed or electronic form without permission.

Falling Into the Fire is psychiatrist Christine Montross’s thoughtful investigation of the gripping patient encounters that have challenged and deepened her practice

Falling Into the Fire is psychiatrist Christine Montross’s thoughtful investigation of the gripping patient encounters that have challenged and deepened her practice. The majority of the patients Montross treats in Falling Into the Fire are seen in the locked inpatient wards of a psychiatric hospital; all are in moments of profound crisis. We meet a young woman who habitually commits self-injury.

No; I who gave them life will give them death oment, one short moment-then . .

No; I who gave them life will give them death oment, one short moment-then forever sorrow. Euripides, Medea I’ve hidden all the knives, Anna said quietly. She and I had just sat down together in a small interview room on the inpatient psychiatric unit, where Anna had been admitted the night before. I hadn’t even had the chance to ask my standard opening question about how it was that she had come to be hospitalized.

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Psychiatrist Christine Montross brings us inside the doctor's mind, sharing gripping patient encounters that reveal the . Сравнить похожие товары. Falling into the Fire : A Psychiatrist's Encounters with the Mind in Crisis by Christine Montross (2014, Paperback).

Psychiatrist Christine Montross brings us inside the doctor's mind, sharing gripping patient encounters that reveal the grave human costs of mental illness, as well as the challenges of diagnosis and treatment.

I am pleased to say that Dr Christine Montross’s latest book, Falling Into the Fire: A Psychiatrist’s Encounters .

I am pleased to say that Dr Christine Montross’s latest book, Falling Into the Fire: A Psychiatrist’s Encounters With the Mind in Crisis, succeeds in filling this void. Dr Montross takes her readers through a series of 7 clinical vignettes experienced during her psychiatry residency and in her early practice as an attending psychiatrist. We meet a young woman who habitually commits self-injury, having ingested light bulbs, a box of nails, and a steak knife, among other objects

Falling Into the Fire: A Psychiatrist's Encounters with the Mind in Crisis.

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Falling Into the Fire is psychiatrist Christine Montross’s thoughtful investigation of the gripping patient encounters that have challenged and deepened. Falling Into the Fire A Psychiatrist's Encounters with the Mind in Crisis by Christine Montross and Publisher Penguin Books (P-US). Christine Montross, author of Body of Work and staff psychiatrist at Butler Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. The thing stays the same.

Falling Into the Fire is psychiatrist Christine Montross’s thoughtful investigation of the gripping patient encounters that have challenged and deepened her practice. The majority of the patients Montross treats in Falling Into the Fire are seen in the locked inpatient wards of a psychiatric hospital; all are in moments of profound crisis. We meet a young woman who habitually commits self-injury, having ingested light bulbs, a box of nails, and a steak knife, among other objects. Her repeated visits to the hospital incite the frustration of the staff, leading Montross to examine how emotion can interfere with proper care. A recent college graduate, dressed in a tunic and declaring that love emanates from everything around him, is brought to the ER by his concerned girlfriend. Is it ecstasy or psychosis? What legal ability do doctors have to hospitalize—and sometimes medicate—a patient against his will? A new mother is admitted with incessant visions of harming her child. Is she psychotic and a danger or does she suffer from obsessive thoughts? Her course of treatment—and her child’s future—depends upon whether she receives the correct diagnosis.Each case study presents its own line of inquiry, leading Montross to seek relevant psychiatric knowledge from diverse sources. A doctor of uncommon curiosity and compassion, Montross discovers lessons in medieval dancing plagues, in leading forensic and neurological research, and in moments from her own life. Beautifully written, deeply felt, Falling Into the Fire brings us inside the doctor’s mind, illuminating the grave human costs of mental illness as well as the challenges of diagnosis and treatment.Throughout, Montross confronts the larger question of psychiatry: What is to be done when a patient’s experiences cannot be accounted for, or helped, by what contemporary medicine knows about the brain? When all else fails, Montross finds, what remains is the capacity to abide, to sit with the desperate in their darkest moments. At once rigorous and meditative, Falling Into the Fire is an intimate portrait of psychiatry, allowing the reader to witness the humanity of the practice and the enduring mysteries of the mind 
Comments: (7)
Spilberg
FALLING INTO THE FIRE: A PSYCHIATRIST’S ENCOUNTERS WITH THE MIND IN CRISIS, by Christine Montross, The Penguin Press, 2013, 239 pages.
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_21?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=falling+into+the+fire+a+psychiatrist%27s+encounters+with+the+mind+in+crisis&sprefix=falling+into+the+fire%2Caps%2C304
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. My daughter thoroughly enjoyed Montross' book and gsave to me on 2 August 2015. The reviews are mostly positive and deservedly so. Dr. Montross is amazingly candid about her personal life and her interaction’s with psychiatric patients. She skillfully describes how her personal experience, what she learned from her patients and her lessons from mentors and the psychiatric literature are intertwined to help her better understand all humans. While I don't always agree with her conclusions they are well thought out and well researched. She comes across as a very intelligent, thoughtful, caring and loving human.
While anyone can read this book for enjoyment and profit, it will be of special interest to psychiatrists and patients. Frank
Legionstatic
Combining her own personal life experiences as a partner and mother with those of patients she has witnessed as an inpatient psychiatrist on the east coast, gifted author Christine Montross bridges the gap between a book that is illuminating on the one hand and downright disturbing on the other. Most crucial to Montross' story is her ability to present unique patient histories with an insightful mind that is constantly on the lookout for new means of treatment while providing the reader access to historical data on the subject at hand.

One chapter not to be missed is titled "Your Drugs Take Away the Love" where Montross examines the world of madness as something stimulating creativity, writing, "Even if madness is at the root of some of the world's great creations, it is hard to imagine that if someone asked each of us to live an entire life of suffering in the service of the arts, we would agree to do so." Such statements are wound around the story of an enlightened man named Colin where Montross provides a scintillating "stop and think" challenge for the reader as to how she can treat Colin's psychotic tendencies.

Without doubt a meaningful contribution to her field that is also a learning experience for any reader, "Falling into the Fire" is a terrific follow-up to Montross' first book, "Body of Work." We can only hope that there are many such works to come.
Anarahuginn
Dr. Montross selects a handful of cases she handled on inpatient units at various points in her career as a psychiatrist
While some of the patients represent fairly rare disorders,including severe body dysmorphic disorder and a woman who engaged in self injury who ate an astonishing quantity of sharp objects for emotional relief, the whole picture of her work is very satisfying.
She speaks of these patients with great compassion and a sincere desire to help unravel the reasons for and potential treatments that can ease the pain of sometimes very fragile and damaged people in real need of help.
I think this book will appeal to those who work in the field as well as anyone who cares about treatment of people with mental illness.
Cordanius
I liked reading about the thought process of this psychiatrist as she meets and treats patients. Each patient comes with her own set of unique circumstances and story, which may or may not inform the diagnosis. Information shared from nurses and other doctors is important and sometimes not communicated clearly or gets lost in a patients thick file. It is like the doctor has to be a very thorough investigator, combing through clues and filtering those clues through medical knowledge. The diagnoses do not come easily.
Yannara
Great teaching stories from the field of psychiatry.
Hucama
Dr. Montross really, really pays attention, to the people she's with and to herself. And she is a very lyrical writer, an adjective I don't use lightly, and it lends poetry to her detailed and thoughtful prose. I am impressed.
Whitebinder
I find this is often a problem with books written by docs about their patients, and especially with mental health professionals. There were parts of the book where she so clearly compared her life to that of her patients--as if to say, "look how normal and wonderful I am comparatively." At one point, she wrote about looking at patients photos and trying to guess their diagnoses just by the photos alone (I don't know, based on "crazy eyes" or something?). It was a game she played with other doctors and nurses on the ward, a sick game if you ask me. I get the need to lighten the mood, and admittedly, she also wrote about how this wasn't a particularly sensitive practice, but as someone living with a mental illness, I just found it offensive.

On the other hand, Christine clearly cares about her patients on the whole, and that comes through as well. Furthermore, her writing is impressive, and I appreciate her candor about being a lesbian. It certainly took a lot of courage given our painfully homophobic society. For that, I applaud her.
Montross' compassion and brilliance shine forth in every sentence. She presents complex cases that are fascinating without being voyeuristic, and her insights are subtle yet powerful. It's been a month since I read the book, but it continues to stay with me.