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eBook Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, New and Expanded Edition download

by James H. Jones

eBook Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, New and Expanded Edition download ISBN: 0029166764
Author: James H. Jones
Publisher: Free Press; Revised edition (January 15, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1372 kb
Fb2: 1747 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: docx txt rtf lit
Category: Medics
Subcategory: Medicine

The Tuskegee Study had nothing to do with treatment has been added to your Cart.

The Tuskegee Study had nothing to do with treatment. From 1932 to 1972 has been added to your Cart.

A new introduction explains why the Tuskegee Study has become a symbol of black oppression and a metaphor for medical neglect, inspiring a prize-winning play, a Nova special, and a motion picture. A new concluding chapter shows how the black community's wide-spread anger and distrust caused by the Tuskegee Study has hampered efforts by health officials to combat AIDS in the black community.

Health Service, whose purport was to demonstrate that the course of untreated syphilis runs differently in blacks as opposed to whites.

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Awesome Popular Psychology Books (20 items) list by melbelleinsc. Manufacturer: Free Press Release date: 15 January 1993 ISBN-10 : 0029166764 ISBN-13: 9780029166765. Use tags to describe a product .

Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male was a clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 by the . Public Health Service

Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male was a clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 by the . Public Health Service. The purpose of this study was to observe the natural history of untreated syphilis; the African-American men in the study were only told they were receiving free health care from the United States government.

Fables & Fairy Tales. President Clinton's apology for the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment to the eight remaining survivors, May 16, 1997. For forty years between 1932 and 1972, the . Public Health Service (PHS) conducted an experiment on 399 black men in the late stages of syphilis.

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Charles Pollard, one of the last survivors, recalled that he heard that men were receiving free physicals at a local one-room schoolhouse, according to the James H. Jones book Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment. So I went over, and they told me I had bad blood, Pollard remembered. And that’s what they’ve been telling me ever since. They come around from time to time and check me over and they say, ‘Charlie, you’ve got bad blood. In the book, Herman Shaw, a farmer, recounted hearing about the study as a kind of health care program.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. It was a Main Selection of the History Book Club and a New York Times Best Books of 1981 and has inspired a play, a PBS Nova special, and a motion picture.

From 1932 to 1972, the United States Public Health Service conducted a non-therapeutic experiment involving over 400 black male sharecroppers infected with syphilis. The Tuskegee Study had nothing to do with treatment. Its purpose was to trace the spontaneous evolution of the disease in order to learn how syphilis affected black subjects.From 1932 to 1972, the United States Public Health Service conducted a non-therapeutic experiment involving over 400 black male sharecroppers infected with syphilis. The Tuskegee Study had nothing to do with treatment. Its purpose was to trace the spontaneous evolution of the disease in order to learn how syphilis affected black subjects. The men were not told they had syphilis; they were not warned about what the disease might do to them; and, with the exception of a smattering of medication during the first few months, they were not given health care. Instead of the powerful drugs they required, they were given aspirin for their aches and pains. Health officials systematically deceived the men into believing they were patients in a government study of “bad blood”, a catch-all phrase black sharecroppers used to describe a host of illnesses. At the end of this 40 year deathwatch, more than 100 men had died from syphilis or related complications. “Bad Blood” provides compelling answers to the question of how such a tragedy could have been allowed to occur. Tracing the evolution of medical ethics and the nature of decision making in bureaucracies, Jones attempted to show that the Tuskegee Study was not, in fact, an aberration, but a logical outgrowth of race relations and medical practice in the United States. Now, in this revised edition of “Bad Blood”, Jones traces the tragic consequences of the Tuskegee Study over the last decade. A new introduction explains why the Tuskegee Study has become a symbol of black oppression and a metaphor for medical neglect, inspiring a prize-winning play, a Nova special, and a motion picture. A new concluding chapter shows how the black community's wide-spread anger and distrust caused by the Tuskegee Study has hampered efforts by health officials to combat AIDS in the black community. “Bad Blood” was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and was one of the “N.Y. Times” 12 best books of the year.
Comments: (7)
Avarm
An excellent discussion of the infamous Tuskegee experiment, which is notorious for its lack for regard for human rights. This book will help you to understand why the black community is mistrustful of outsiders coming to 'help' them, although you may be left wondering how on earth the doctors of the PHS could justify their actions to themselves, and keep on denying men the treatment they needed.
Gnng
To think that medical personnel could conduct such an experiment, and that the collusion with it extended far and wide almost requires a willing suspension of disbelief. Illiterate, indigent individuals were persuaded to participate in a study of the progress of syphilis for nothing more than a modest burial payment. Black and white doctors and nurses, medical professionals at the federal, state, and local levels, were involved in this experiment, to the utter disgrace of every one who took part. Leading men of the day thought it was perfectly okay to continue the experiment and to leave the subjects untreated even after the discovery that penicillin would likely have cured them of the disease. The fact that the experiment did not end until some forty years ago suggests that racism was at its heart and core. These men were simply expendable, and this fine book illuminates it all.
Negal
This book is probably one of the first of the expose type to zero in on medical culpability in the US. Most people tend to think that only Germany was capable of doing the atrocities that occurred during WWII. It was these atrocities that led to the Nuremburg Code of conduct for physicians and scientists, yet it was known prior to the Germans butchery that other countries including the US and England were equally responsible for using human beings for questionable experiments. As a student in medical school I came across references to this book and others like it. My interest lay in the fact that as a Deaf person, I know what it is like to have doctors treat me with disrespect and patronizingly. I started researching into how lack of education leads to people being taken advantage of by the medical establishment. In my research, so many referred back to this particular book, I decided I just had to read it. Not only have I read it but I have lent it to others who share my concern that there are medical practitioners out there like Kervorkian who would have no problem putting to death or using for unethical experiments, people who they view as less than people. Jones did a magnificent job of research and follow-up with those involved in this horrible fiasco. Not only were these doctors racist, but they considered anyone with lower education to be only as useful as animals...to an extent they treated these men with less care and concern then they treat animals used in experiments today. Jones was more than fair, including reasons for why these doctors and nurses, both black and white, did not perceive this long on-going experiment as being wrong. It is partially due to his exposure of this experiment, that other minority groups including the disabled are looking carefully at the medical establishment for bias and prejudice, for neglect and outright denial of fair medical treatment and availability of treatment. Every medical student, public health student, science student, educator, and frankly everyone should read this book. I am deeply concerned that if we don't pay attention to the ethics of all the new science and medical information being found, we will once again allow someone somewhere in our nation the opportunity to use a particular group of people for their own unethical purposes. We cannot afford to turn a 'blind' eye to this happening again. Karen L. Sadler, Science Education, University of Pittsburgh, [email protected]
The Sinners from Mitar
The "study" of the natural history of syphilis in black men is important to understand. Because it involved US federal funds and US federal researchers, it was a key demonstration that serious ethical problems in research were a mainstream event rather than a fringe problem; awareness of this project fueled concern for regulatory oversight and led to the development of federal regulations. James Jones' revelations were key to this process, and everyone involved in human subjects' research should read this book. Overall, the book is well researched and well presented. One of the more frightening aspects of Tuskegee is subtle, and doesn't get as thorough a treatment as it could have; that is, some of the outrageous features of the project were not the result of single outrageous decisions, but were rather the sum of many smaller errors. These are harder for a researcher to dismiss as things s/he could never have done. As a physician, I can comfortably say that I would never deliberately deny effective therapy to someone with a serious illness. But I can not as glibly say that I would have been the one to stand up and rebel when a protocol committee in the late 1940s or early 1950s decided that the evidence for penicillin's effectiveness in advanced syphilis was not QUITE good enough to mandate terminating the project. There are also some rough spots in some of the technical information, most glaringly a rather startlingly inaccurate description of what's involved in a spinal tap. Those are small issues, though. Overall, this is an excellent book that makes it abundantly clear why Tuskegee is so important to our thinking about research ethics, and helps the reader understand why certain racial and ethnic groups have a distrust of medical research.