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eBook Reasoning about Luck: Probability and its Uses in Physics download

by Vinay Ambegaokar

eBook Reasoning about Luck: Probability and its Uses in Physics download ISBN: 0521442176
Author: Vinay Ambegaokar
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (July 13, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 247
ePub: 1222 kb
Fb2: 1211 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: docx doc azw txt
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Physics

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Reasoning About Luck: Probability and .

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Reasoning About Luck: Probability and Its Uses in Physics (Dover Books on Physics). If students who are not majoring in science understood no more physics than that presented by Ambegaokar, they would have a solid basis for thinking about physics and the other sciences. Physics Today there is a real need for rethinking how we teach thermal physics-at all levels, but especially to undergraduates. Progessor Ambegaokar has done just that, and given us an outstanding and ambitious textbook for nonscience majors.

Vinay Ambegaokar's "Reasoning About Luck" is a beautifully written, highly original treatment of probability in the physical sciences - notable for its clarity, its wit, and its insights. It succeeds admirably in teaching the subject to any attentive reader, even one with no mathematics beyond high- school algebra, and yet can be read with pleasure and profit by professional physicists as well. This item: Reasoning About Luck: Probability and Its Uses in Physics (Dover Books on Physics).

Reasoning About Luck: Probability and Its Uses in Physics. This book introduces college students and other readers to the uses of probability and statistics in the physical sciences, focusing on thermal and statistical physics and touching upon quantum physics. Widely praised as beautifully written and thoughtful, Reasoning About Luck explains concepts in a way that readers can understand and enjoy, even students who are not specializing in science and those outside the classroom - only some familiarity with basic algebra is necessary.

Page 21 The last sentence of the solution to Problem 6 should read: For a less obviously correct, and thus more controversial, use of this kind of reasoning, see solved problem (2) at the end of Chapter 8. Page 24 Plot in the lower left corner of Fig. is mislabeled. The corrected version appears here: Page 40 The third full sentence should read: Misconceptions about conceptions. Page 65. ⎛ x ⎞.

Reasoning About Luck book.

This book introduces college students and other readers to the uses of probability and statistics in the physical sciences, focusing . I find Professor Ambegaokar's style throughout the book to be graceful and witty, with a nice balance of both encouragement and admonishment.

This book introduces college students and other readers to the uses of probability and statistics in the physical sciences, focusing on thermal and statistical physics and touching upon quantum physics. American Journal of Physics.

majors," this book introduces the uses of probability and statistics in the physical sciences, focusing on thermal and statistical physics. Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/Reasoning About Luck: Probability and Its Uses in Physics.

2017 ISBN: 0486807010 240 Pages AZW3/MOBI/EPUB/PDF (conv) 3. 8 MB Praised by the American Journal of Physics as "an outstanding and ambitious textbook for nonscience majors," this book introduces the uses of probability and statistics in the physical sciences, focusing on thermal and statistical physics.

Reasoning about Luck. Probability and its Uses in Physics. Ambegaokar, Vinay and Troyer, Matthias 2010. Estimating errors reliably in Monte Carlo simulations of the Ehrenfest model. American Journal of Physics, Vol. 78, Issue. Cited by 8. Cited by. 8. Crossref Citations. This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

This book introduces the reader to statistical reasoning and its use in physics

This book introduces the reader to statistical reasoning and its use in physics. It is based on a course developed for non-science majors at Cornell University, and differs from other treatments by its wide-ranging use of quantitative methods, which are built up in a constructive way and assume only that the reader can add, subtract, multiply, and divide with confidence. The main application for this volume will be as a text for non-science students.

This book introduces the reader to statistical reasoning and its use in physics. It differs from other treatments of physics for nonscientists in its wide-ranging use of quantitative methods, which assume only that the reader can add, subtract, multiply and divide with confidence. The author begins with a self-contained introduction to the everyday uses of probability, including the quantitative assessment of statistical information. The author develops the basic idea of mechanical motion, the molecular theory of gases, entropy as a measure of molecular agitation, limitations on the conversion of heat to work, the physics of the direction of time; chaos, and the role of probability in quantum mechanics. To aid self instruction, there are solved problems at the end of each chapter. This book is perfect for undergraduate physics students and nonscience majors.
Comments: (6)
Nanecele
Although this book was written to explain probability and statistics in thermal and statistical (even a little quantum) physics to non-physics majors, it would be very beneficial to both physics majors in their first two years, as well as AP Physics high school students. It is based on a course for non-physics majors at Cornell.

The book explains concepts very clearly with the requisite math. Prerequisite math is stated to be High School only (and technically, that is true -- no calculus), however the algebra could be quite challenging (e.g., the derivation of a simplification to Stirling's approximation for n!)for that audience. The diligent student will learn a lot of beautiful physics from this book (as well as, probably, improving their math skills). My only (minor) criticism is that there are no exercises, though there are many fully-worked examples that, themselves, teach a lot of physics.

Don't hesitate; a wonderful discovery!
Ndyardin
A lovely book. Well worth spending a lot of time with.
Akinozuru
The topics touched upon in this book include probability theory, Newtonian mechanics, statistical physics, thermodynamics, chaos theory and quantum mechanics. The main theme, as suggested in the book’s title/subtitle is the application of probability in physics.

I have read many books on most of the above topics over the decades; some were extremely clear, captivating and very well-written, while others simply had awkward presentations, were not very clear and were simply s slog to read. I would place the present book somewhere in the middle of that range. I found some presentations to be clear, clever, engaging and very well done but others rather unclear, seemingly incomplete and somewhat awkward.

I believe that this book could be used as one of several references in a course on some of the above topics. But simply reading it for pleasure, as I did, may lead to disappointment as it did in my case.
Frdi
I ran into this book by accident (or "luck" as the author would say). I perused the section on entropy, which is one of the most misunderstood but widely used terms. The treatment was crystal clear and deep. I then wandered off to sample the rest of the book, when I realized it was for non-specialists. It has been my pet peeve that most attempts at popularization consist of simply material written for professionals with the equations deleted, making them uniformly useless to all parties concerned. This book is a refreshing exception aimed at a reader who is willing to do the requisite work and enjoy the satisfaction of really understanding the basics of probability and its applications to statistical physics. While not everything in this subject can be explained to nonexperts, the author has carefully chosen a path that I know will make sense to a diligent reader and give a true flavor for the subject and genuine sense of accomplishment at the end. All that is required is a minimum knowledge of algebra and a true desire to really understanding something, rather than a craving for the "warm and fuzzy" feeling
of having understood something profound without the requisite effort.
Of late more and more colleges have tried to expose nonscientists to quantitative reasoning. Now, such a course has to be about something. Why not Statistical Physics, which on the one hand is incredibly far reaching in its consequences and on the other, accessible with minimum of preamble. There is no longer the excuse that a suitable text does not exist. Here it is, so go ahead and use it for self-study or your class! The section on entropy alone will make it worthwhile. Finally, even if you know all the physics, this will teach you how write the most elegant prose.
Vertokini
Unlike other books in its genre (for example, Science for Non-Scientists, Physics for Poets, and Math for Liberal Arts Majors), this book does not skim over or shy away from fundamental quantitative concepts in order to avoid losing readers who are uncomfortable with math. Instead, it rigorously shepherds even a math-phobic reader step-by-small-step from basic algebra through the development of the quantitative, probabilistic, and statistical building blocks that are needed to appreciate the wonders of present-day physics. In the process, it teaches the reader those building blocks and demonstrates their beauty and elegance in-and-of-themselves, and their power to explain the world.

The book’s rigor, however, should not lead one to view it solely as a college textbook. Its greatest appeal may be for recreational, but serious, readers who have some math background or are willing to backtrack briefly here and there to pick up whatever strands a particular reader may not have fully appreciated in high school or introductory college courses. It develops these ideas artfully from the basics, and provides a refresher course plus a new perspective on those basics (whether the topic is logarithms, probability, thermodynamics, entropy, or something else). Even those who are unable to grasp everything in the book will experience success and joy in understanding many ideas that had previously eluded them.

Just as poetry can dramatically enhance and transform one’s view of its object forever, this book will enhance and transform the reader’s quantitative intuition and worldview. Therefore, perhaps it should be viewed more like a “Poetry of Physics and Probability” book than a “Physics and Probability for Poets” book or a textbook.
Via
Vinay Ambegaokar's "Reasoning About Luck" is a beautifully
written, highly original treatment of probability in the
physical sciences -- notable for its clarity, its wit, and its
insights. It succeeds admirably in teaching the subject to any
attentive reader, even one with no mathematics beyond high-
school algebra, and yet can be read with pleasure and profit
by professional physicists as well