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eBook The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics As the Language of Nature download

by Heinz R. Pagels

eBook The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics As the Language of Nature download ISBN: 0671248022
Author: Heinz R. Pagels
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1st edition (February 1, 1982)
Language: English
Pages: 370
ePub: 1985 kb
Fb2: 1754 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt lrf lrf azw
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Physics

Dover Publications (1982). Similar books and articles. Modern Physics and Problems of Knowledge. Coherence, Entanglement, and Reductionist Explanation in Quantum Physics

Dover Publications (1982). Coherence, Entanglement, and Reductionist Explanation in Quantum Physics,". Gregg Jaeger & Sahotra Sarkar - 2003 - In A. Ashtekar (e., Revisiting the Foundations of Relativistic Physics. Essays 1958-1962 on Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge.

Quantum physics clarified-with a passion to convey its enigmas as well as its illuminations

Quantum physics clarified-with a passion to convey its enigmas as well as its illuminations. Using these new unified field theories, physicists reconstruct the first few seconds of the big bang at the beginning of time when the universe was a swirling fireball of quarks and other quanta. Everything we know came out of that fireball. How our universe was born through a succession of broken symmetries and how it might end is described.

A Bantam new age book. Includes bibliographical references and index. Victoria University Library has Northrop Frye's copy with his annotations. Victoria University Library's Frye copy: 1983 printing.

Автор: Pagels Heinz Название: The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics as the .

Поставляется из: США Описание: This is one of the most important books on quantum mechanics ever written for general readers, in which an eminent physicist discusses and explains the core concepts of physics without resorting to complicated mathematics. Can be read by anyone.

American physicist Heinz Pagels (1939–1988) was Adjunct Professor of Physics at Rockefeller University as well as the . The Cosmic Code avoids falling into the trap of promoting theories that violate causality, frame independence or both.

American physicist Heinz Pagels (1939–1988) was Adjunct Professor of Physics at Rockefeller University as well as the Executive Director and CEO of the New York Academy of Sciences and President of the International League for Human Rights. Pagels has the unique ability to keep his deep philosophical insights grounded in rigorous physical truth and to avoid going into unsupportable flights of fancy like so many other authors do.

PDF On Jan 1, 1982, H. R. Pagels and others published The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics as the . According to this interpretation, all quantum objects, not just electrons, are little waves and all of nature is a great wave phenomenon.

According to this interpretation, all quantum objects, not just electrons, are little waves and all of nature is a great wave phenomenon. Einstein, stating his objection to the new quantum theory remark that " he did not believe God plays " (Pagels, 1983).

The Cosmic Code can be read by anyone. Pagels is unfailingly lighthearted and confident. Scientific American"A sound, clear, vital work that deserves the attention of anyone who takes an interest in the relationship between material reality and the human mind. American physicist Heinz Pagels (1939–1988) was Adjunct Professor of Physics at Rockefeller University as well as the Executive Director and CEO of the New York Academy of Sciences and President of the International League for Human Rights.

The Cosmic Code book. The Cosmic Code (the book) provides a thorough introduction to the field of quantum physics by exploring its historical development over the course of the 20th century, key questions, experimental breakthroughs, most impactful contributing scientists, and future directions. Is it an easy book to read? While it's supposedly written for the lay person, it does contain a lot of scientific ideas and concepts, and it's not as easy to follow as say, your typical story book, self help book, or autobiography. But the challenge is rewarding.

Heinz Pagels, an eminent physicist and science writer, discusses and explains the core concepts of physics without resorting to complicated mathematics

Heinz Pagels, an eminent physicist and science writer, discusses and explains the core concepts of physics without resorting to complicated mathematics. The two-part treatment outlines the history of quantum physics and addresses complex subjects such as Bell's theorem and elementary particle physics, drawing upon the work of Bohr, Gell-Mann, and others. Anecdotes from the personal documents of Einstein, Oppenheimer, Bohr, and Planck offer intimate glimpses of the scientists whose work forever changed the world. This is the best Quantum Physics book even written for the lay man. Infact, it might even be the best popular science book ever written.

This is the best Quantum Physics book even written for the lay man. I have been a fan of this book for over 15 years and I feel that it is "must read" for every student involved or pursuing any branch of pure science (not necessarily physics). Amazingly well explained concepts that stream you to the miniscule, abstract world of Quantum Mechanics. com User, July 15, 2002.

Traces the development of the quantum theory, explains current understanding of the origin and structure of matter, and shows how scientists discover physical laws
Comments: (7)
Vijora
Heinz Pagels got it right when so many others fell short. I've read many books on cosmology and physics where the authors succumb to group think, making assertions that simply don't hold up to the facts. The Cosmic Code avoids falling into the trap of promoting theories that violate causality, frame independence or both.

Pagels has the unique ability to keep his deep philosophical insights grounded in rigorous physical truth and to avoid going into unsupportable flights of fancy like so many other authors do. This book is unusually well-written and is completely accessible to both expert and non-expert alike. It was effortless and a joy to read.

I especially liked his treatment of the EPR paper and Bell's Inequality. This is often very difficult to describe, but Pagels did it brilliantly.

I could go on and on about this book with more superlatives, but that wouldn't do it justice. Just read it and you'll see.

https://sites.google.com/site/amateurscientistessays/
Haal
I stumbled upon this book by accident while googling- because I was looking for a better introductory book to Quantum Physics. At first, I didn't want to read it because it was published in 1982 and I thought it must be hopelessly outdated.

However, the book is superb- although the section on the Standard Model is outdated, the bulk of the book on Quantum Theory is just as correct today as when it was published 30 years ago. Pagels was a true rarity- a first-rate scientist, who was also a first-rate writer (in terms of clarity and writing style). Some of his writing is truly beautiful- even poetic.

The ending (which prefigures his death in 1989 from a mountain climbing accident) is truly poignant.

Note: Cosmic Code starts with Einstein's Special and General Relativity. I doubt that anyone without prior exposure will be able to understand Relativity from Pagels' account. However, be aware that his main intent is to provide historical context of Relativity. The bulk of the book is on Quantum Physics, which he explains better than any book I've read.
Deodorant for your language
Excellent classic work that I discovered only recently. It remains highly relevant today taking into account that 'dark energy' and 'dark matter' where not mainstream considerations in 1980. I have found that reading older texts sometimes helps the layman or beginner understand highly abstract and difficult concepts in science, notably relativity and quantum mechanics. We tend to run to the latest books thinking that "they know best," but the truth is that quantum mechanics is no better understood today than 1970, and some would say even 1945. This book by Pagels helps non-professional physicists understand topics that real physicists are still grappling with, and I think it helps that it was written at a simpler time in physics.

As an aside, academic physics is known for lineages where a famous teacher passes the baton to his later famous students. The most famous lineage includes Bohr, Wheeler, Feynman, and Everett. But I was pleasantly surprised to learn that Pagels in his shortened professional life taught and mentored Seth Lloyd who has certainly continued to carry the baton in "quantum computation" to this day. This knowledge makes me want to read the final work by Pagels, "The Computer and the Rise of the Science of Complexity," which was written in the pioneering days of 'natural computationalism' in physics and has clearly influenced the current work of Seth Lloyd.
Xwnaydan
This very readable book covers early physics concepts and follows advances in our understanding of the nature of the universe through the modern concepts of an experimentally supported theory called quantum physics.

There is practically no use of detailed mathematics; the information is presented in such a way that the non-scientist, non-engineer, non-physicist, non-mathematician can understand the basic concepts involved.

The purpose of the book is to give the lay reader a better understanding of the physical world in which we live. The author extends the discussion to his personal views about God and religion. Regardless of ones personal beliefs, the facts that seem to be supported by experimental data need to reconned with. Truth is truth, and an understanding of the physical world should only increase ones appreciation for both the spiritual and physical nature of our existance.
NI_Rak
This is a great book which explains fully. in layman's terms.
what Quantum Theory is all about and, in addition, the errors of
the various comparisons with Eastern Religions that have surfaced from it. In addition, it explains in detail "Bell's Inequality"as it applies to the Quantum phenomenon of "Entanglement" which has been misinterpreted as proof of the existence of what Einstein called "spooky information at at distance," equivalent to Star Trek's "Beam Me Up Scotty!" E.G. Telepathy.
Thiama
A concise but necessarily somewhat outdated overview of modern physics which I greatly enjoyed and still highly recommend. Although there is no math, it will undoubtedly conceptually challenge many readers, but that's because in the true tradition of a Feynman or Sagan, Pagels tries to really teach the reader something instead of blinding them with science. A classic in its category.
Renthadral
Very well written and readable. However, the extensive discussion of enumerable sub-atomic particles seems to distract from the overall purpose of the book.
Good overview of the current state of physics and humanity’s ever changing (incomplete) view of what constitutes reality. I’m not sure I agree completely with the authors conclusion but nevertheless it is thorough and logical. I will revisit portions of this book again.