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eBook Optics and the Theory of Electrons: Volume 2 of Pauli Lectures on Physics (Dover Books on Physics) download

by Wolfgang Pauli

eBook Optics and the Theory of Electrons: Volume 2 of Pauli Lectures on Physics (Dover Books on Physics) download ISBN: 0486414582
Author: Wolfgang Pauli
Publisher: Dover Publications; Unabridged edition (October 18, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 176
ePub: 1794 kb
Fb2: 1946 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf azw mobi mbr
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Physics

Electrodynamics: Volume 1 of Pauli Lectures on Physics (Dover Books on Physics). This is a very short book on optics.

Electrodynamics: Volume 1 of Pauli Lectures on Physics (Dover Books on Physics). It has only some 170 pages! Still, it's a great fun! Pauli starts witn the Fermat principle and soon finds out the Hamilon-Jacobi equation connected to this variational principle: it's the eikonal equation. He proceeds to get a lot of general results in geometrical optics. After that come interference and diffraction; optics from Maxwell theory,crystal and molecular optics. You'll find fresh perspectives, surprising connections, everywhere.

Optics and the Theory of Electrons: Volume 2 of Pauli Lectures on Physics (Dover . Pauli, who was rated by Born to be as good as Einstein, taught theoretical physics for many years at Technische Hochschule at Zurich

Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Pauli, who was rated by Born to be as good as Einstein, taught theoretical physics for many years at Technische Hochschule at Zurich. This book is labored on notes taken by students from his lectures on Electrodynamics. This is the book I consult when I am not happy with the explanations in the usual books. If it happens that Pauli touches the subject, I always get what I looked for: conceptual clarity and very good algorithms.

Pauli Lectures on Physics book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Pauli Lectures on Physics: Volume 2, Optics and the Theory of Electrons as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Peerless resource for students and professionals includes an index and a wealth of helpful figures.

In the 1950s, the distinguished theoretical physicist Wolfgang Pauli delivered a trademark . 1. Theory of Interference and Diffraction.

In the 1950s, the distinguished theoretical physicist Wolfgang Pauli delivered a trademark series of lectures at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. This volume, the second of the series, focusing on optics and the theory of electrons, examines geometrical optics, the theory of interference and diffraction, Maxwell's Theory, crystal optics, and molecular optics. As does each volume in the series, this book includes an index and a wealth of helpful figures, and can be read independently of the series by those who wish to focus on a particular topic.

Theory of Electrons : Volume 2 of Pauli Lectures on Physics

Optics and the Theory of Electrons : Volume 2 of Pauli Lectures on Physics. Dover Books on Physics. In the 1950s, the distinguished theoretical physicist Wolfgang Pauli delivered a trademark series of lectures at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. Format Paperback 192 pages. Dimensions 137 x 216 x . 5mm 20. 2g. Publication date 18 Oct 2010.

The lectures on optics serve as a concise and rewarding introduction to the topic. The reason for this remarkable fact lies in Pauli's style, which is commensurate to the greatness of its subject in its clarity and impact. Style in scientific writing is a quality that today is on the point of vanishing.

Place of Publication. 192. Country of Publication. The World, Ideas, Culture": General Interest. Dover Publications Inc.

Similar books and articles. Theory of Relativity. Wolfgang Pauli - 1958 - New York: Pergamon Press. Quantum Physics, Philosophy, and the Image of God: Insights From Wolfgang Pauli. K. V. Laurikainen - 1990 - Zygon 25 (4):391-404. Pauli's Ideas on Mind and Matter in the Context of Contemporary of Science. Experimental Test of the Pauli Exclusion Principle. A. S. Barabash - 2010 - Foundations of Physics 40 (7):703-718. Pauli Versus Heisenberg: A Case Study of the Heuristic Role of Philosophy. Pauli-Dirac Matrix Generators of Clifford Algebras. Charles P. Poole & Horacio A. Farach - 1982 - Foundations of Physics 12 (7):719-738. Date of Publication. All listings for this product.

In the 1950s, the distinguished theoretical physicist Wolfgang Pauli delivered a trademark series of lectures at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. His comprehensive coverage of the fundamentals of classical and modern physics was painstakingly recorded not only by his students but also by a number of collaborators whose carefully edited transcriptions resulted in a remarkable six-volume work.This volume, the second of the series, focusing on optics and the theory of electrons, examines geometrical optics, the theory of interference and diffraction, Maxwell's Theory, crystal optics, and molecular optics. As does each volume in the series, this book includes an index and a wealth of helpful figures, and can be read independently of the series by those who wish to focus on a particular topic.

Comments: (3)
SARAND
This is a short and light book that addresses the main subject clearly and concisely and, at various points, brings some different foci than those often dealt with by reference books. It worth have all six books of the serie. In addition, the book arrived within de estimated delivery time and in excellent condition. I recommend!
salivan
After completing a course in Optics ( and, after perusal of a number of Optics textbooks) one ascertains that it is difficult, perhaps impossible, to write the ideal optics monograph. This text by Pauli, based as it is upon his 1948 Lecture Notes (prepared by Scheidegger) is no exception (it is not ideal). However, with that understanding behind
us, Pauli does manage to provide a more understandable approach than is otherwise readily available. Keep in mind that moderate mathematical facility is prerequisite (say, fourth-year physics student). Keep in mind, too, that Pauli does not compartmentalize Physics: these Lectures utilize the entire panoply of Physics courses in the service of his Lectures (that is: mechanics, electromagnetism and statistical mechanics). Happily, those prerequisites can be reviewed by perusal of Pauli's other Volumes (affording opportunity to avail oneself of the entire set of Six !). Onward to optics as Pauli presents it: five chapters, all of 150 pages (Appendix of Notes is three more pages).
With such slim offerings, one wonders what is expounded herein that is both understandable and comprehensible !
Happily, we are treated to:
(1) Mathematics of Fermat: " from this, it is seen that Fermat's Principle can only be a certain approximation to reality" (Page 7).
(2) Hamilton (Classical Mechanics) introduced for the service of Optics, read: " Thus, in optics, as well as mechanics, the extremal principle can be expressed in canonical form." (pages 14-25 will accomplish just that !).
(3) Waves (interference and diffraction) chapter two: Complex variables and Fourier analysis placed into service.
Read Pauli: " The principle of linear superposition is a general property of the waves considered here," as made evident in the following ten pages.
(4) Diffraction, Kirchoff and Fresnel, next. Green's theorem heavily utilized. Bessel functions introduced. Fear not, connection to experiment is always laid bare (diffraction, in succession, by slits, by circular aperture, by gratings).
Read Pauli: " Technically, two neighboring wavelengths are considered to be ' resolved' if the principal maximum of one falls exactly on the first minimum of the other." (page 59).
(5) Maxwell's Theory (Chapter Three). We read: "...certain optical phenomena can be demonstrated which can be explained only on the basis of the concept of Transverse Vector Waves." This, Pauli proceeds to show in fifteen pages. Read: "...since, in accordance with the general electrodynamic law of force, E exerts a force on stationary as well as on moving charges, we always operate with E, the electric field vector...most of the effects of light are to be attributed to the effects of E." (Page 68).
(6) Moving away from isotropic media, the ensuing chapter focuses upon crystal optics. Note Equation #12.5, it is introduced as a postulate. Note, too, invocation of energy conservation. A fascinating discussion ensues of "duality" alongside its geometrical interpretation.
(7) We move away from crystals, to molecules. Again, energy conservation uppermost in mind. Differential equations for oscillators, for various media, extolled; solutions derived (pages: 110, 117 & 119). Superposition, reiterated. And, physical considerations (energy conservation) kept to prominence. A highlight of this chapter: Lorentz and scattering. The blue-sky (Rayleigh) beautifully described and derived, we read: "...density fluctuations occur which cause scattering...we see that short waves are scattered more strongly than long waves...permits Avogadro's number to be determined." (pages 124-127). How wonderful is that !
(8) Helpful too, at this juncture, are illustrations and figures found in the introductory textbook of Hecht: Optics, 1974, Chapter Eight: Polarization. If Hecht (as an undergraduate student) leaves you wanting more (more quantitative, but less qualitative), then Pauli is your resource.
(9) Optics, as can be had from Feynman's Lectures (volume one, chapters 26-33) are brilliant and incomparable. Feynman approaches much of Pauli's material in a physical manner. Therefore, as complementary aspects of the same Physics (flip sides of the same coin), study Feynman first, then study Pauli.
Both sets of Lectures (Feynman and Pauli) should occupy a permanent place in any library of optics.
Pauli is highly recommended as a mathematically inclined, adjunct, study of optics.
Jum
This is a very short book on optics. It has only some 170 pages!
Still, it's a great fun! Pauli starts witn the Fermat principle and soon finds out the Hamilon-Jacobi equation connected to this variational principle: it's the eikonal equation. He proceeds to get a lot of general results in geometrical optics. After that come interference and diffraction; optics from Maxwell theory,crystal and molecular optics. You'll find fresh perspectives, surprising connections, everywhere. This is the ideal book to review your optical expertise: you'll have lots of fun seeing things you are familiar with, much better done!