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eBook The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics download

by Roland Omnès

eBook The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics download ISBN: 0691036691
Author: Roland Omnès
Publisher: Princeton University Press; First Printing edition (July 11, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 576
ePub: 1133 kb
Fb2: 1480 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: rtf mbr azw docx
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Physics

The book The Interpretation of Quantum Me-chanics by Roland Omnès represents the con-servative camp. It builds on various newer ideas, including decoherence and the notion of con-sistent histories

The book The Interpretation of Quantum Me-chanics by Roland Omnès represents the con-servative camp. It builds on various newer ideas, including decoherence and the notion of con-sistent histories. The author refers in particular. Projections do not commute. to related work of Griffiths (on consistent his-tories) and by Zurek (on decoherence) and by Gell-Mann and Hartle (another synthesis). The im-portance of the book is that it represents a self-contained statement of one variant of what may become the new orthodox position.

Let us read from Roland Omnes: (1) "The status of probability theory in quantum mechanics is therefore very different from . 2 people found this helpful.

Let us read from Roland Omnes: (1) "The status of probability theory in quantum mechanics is therefore very different from what it is in classical physics, not so much when it comes to their use, but rather when one considers their conceptual nature. Page 10). (2) Experimental Devices in Second Chapter: Photographic detection, Photomultipliers, Bubble Chambers and Stern-Gerlach.

Interpretation Quantum Mechanics book. The interpretation of quantum mechanics has been controversial since the introduction of quantum theory in the 1920s. Although the Copenhagen interpretation is commonly accepted, its usual formulation suffers from some serious drawbacks. Based mainly on Bohr's concepts, the formulation assumes an independent and essential validity of classical concepts running in parallel The interpretation of quantum mechanics has been controversial since the introduction of quantum theory in the 1920s.

In this book, Roland Omnès examines a number of recent advances, which, combined, lead to a consistent revision of. .

In this book, Roland Omnès examines a number of recent advances, which, combined, lead to a consistent revision of the Copenhagen interpretation. His aim is to show how this interpretation can fit all present experiments, to weed out unnecessary or questionable assumptions, and to assess the domain of validity where the older statements apply.

An interpretation of quantum mechanics is an attempt to explain how the mathematical theory of quantum mechanics "corresponds" to reality. Although quantum mechanics has held up to rigorous and extremely precise tests in an extraordinarily. Although quantum mechanics has held up to rigorous and extremely precise tests in an extraordinarily broad range of experiments (not one prediction from quantum mechanics is found to be contradicted by experiments), there exist a number of contending schools of thought over their interpretation

Omnes' interpretation of quantum mechanics is summarized, and compared with other consistent-history approaches by.arXiv:quant-ph/9505008v1 16 May 1995. The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics.

Omnes' interpretation of quantum mechanics is summarized, and compared with other consistent-history approaches by Gell-Mann and Hartle, and by Griffiths. Princeton University. This monograph is the first book-length treatment of the consistent histories approach. to the interpretation of quantum mechanics which I initiated in 1984, and to which Omn&.

Georges Charpak, Roland Omnès. Understanding Quantum Mechanics. Quantum Philosophy: Understanding and Interpreting Contemporary Science.

Cite this chapter as: Omnès R. (1995) Consistent Histories and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. In: Ferrero . van der Merwe A. (eds) Fundamental Problems in Quantum Physics. Fundamental Theories of Physics (An International Book Series on The Fundamental Theories of Physics: Their Clarification, Development and Application), vol 73. Springer, Dordrecht.

Roland Omnès is Professor of Physics at the University of Paris XI. His books include Quantum Philosophy: Understanding and Interpreting Contemporary Science (see p. 22 in this catalog), The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (Princeton), L'Univers et ses Metamorphoses, an. 22 in this catalog), The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (Princeton), L'Univers et ses Metamorphoses, and Introduction to Particle Physics.

Roland Omnes is Professor of Physics at the University of Paris XI. 22 in this catalog), The Interpretation of Quantum. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

The interpretation of quantum mechanics has been controversial since the introduction of quantum theory in the 1920s. Although the Copenhagen interpretation is commonly accepted, its usual formulation suffers from some serious drawbacks. Based mainly on Bohr's concepts, the formulation assumes an independent and essential validity of classical concepts running in parallel with quantum ones, and leaves open the possibility of their ultimate conflict. In this book, Roland Omnès examines a number of recent advances, which, combined, lead to a consistent revision of the Copenhagen interpretation. His aim is to show how this interpretation can fit all present experiments, to weed out unnecessary or questionable assumptions, and to assess the domain of validity where the older statements apply.

Drawing on the new contributions, The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics offers a complete and self-contained treatment of interpretation (in nonrelativistic physics) in a manner accessible to both physicists and students. Although some "hard" results are included, the concepts and mathematical developments are maintained at an undergraduate level. This book enables readers to check every step, apply the techniques to new problems, and make sure that no paradox or obscurity can arise in the theory. In the conclusion, the author discusses various philosophical implications pertinent to the study of quantum mechanics.

Comments: (5)
Buridora
A hard to read book, requires dedication and hard work to go through but pays back.
Delari
Quantum mechanics (QM) is a fundamental (and very successful) theory of physics which so far has not been contradicted by experiments. The problem with QM, however, lies in the interpretation of the outcome of a measurement performed with a classical, macroscopic apparatus. The so called Copenhagen interpretation, proposed by Bohr and Heisenberg in the 1930s, represents the interpretation of QM widely accepted by most physicists. However, it has been subjected to serious criticisms and alternative interpretations (e.g. many worlds interpretation) have been proposed in the last 80 years or so.
Omnes' book (500+ pages, 12 chapters) discusses the Copenhagen interpretation (p. 81) in great detail and proposes a modification of the theory so as to remove several of its contradictions. After almost 20 years since the publication of Omnes' book (1994), the discussion about the interpretation of QM is more lively than ever (a recent review can be found in Rev. Mod. Phys. 85, 471–527 (2013), Models of wave-function collapse, underlying theories, and experimental tests). Omnes has penned a second book, Understanding Quantum Mechanics (1999), which is less technical and slimmer than the present one thereby intended for a wider audience.
Zargelynd
The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics seems to be the dominant point of view (at least implicitly) for both undergraduate and graduate quantum mechanics courses. This is certainly adequate for understanding a tremendous amount of quantum mechanics and doing pretty much any calculations one would want to do. However, this approach suffers some shortcomings and cannot be the last word. Among these shortcomings are the postulated existence of an external classical world, the fundamental role of measurement and the collapse of the wavefunction. Obviously any classical world is just an approximation of a quantum one and when considering the universe as a whole there is no external observer of any kind. Also, there can't be anything fundamentally special about a measurement.

From a practical point of view perhaps the main limitation of this is probably the study of quantum cosmology, which surely requires something beyond the Copenhagen interpretation. There is one additional additional problem this can lead to. It's not so much a problem for physics students or other serious scholars, but rather for those only engaging in casual thought about quantum mechanics. The problem is that elevating external observers and measurement to fundamental roles seems to lead to a lot of nonsense ideas, for example consious observers defining reality.

This book presents a thorough discussion that will help one to develop a more satisfying perspective of quantum mechanics. The level of the quantum mechanics assumed isn't high, mainly basic undergraduate quantum mechanics. The material in the book varies in difficulty from simple to fairly challenging. The material includes discussions of consistent histories, quantum logic, decoherence and many of the quantum mechanics paradoxes (EPR, Wigner's friend and of course the ubiquitous Schrodinger's cat). It's pretty clear that the last word on this subject hasn't been said, but this book contributes a lot to the discussion. I think quantum mechanical paradoxes in general are harder to resolve than the ones from relativity, but this book does a nice job of describing them and showing how they often arise from asking questions one isn't allowed to ask in the quantum framework (although these questions are perfectly sensible in the classical world).

This kind of material might not be absolutely required for physics students. However, in my opinion students (especially specialists in theoretical physics) should at least be familiar with most of the ideas, especially the consistent histories approach and decoherence. This book is very comprehensive and might be overkill for some who might prefer something more condensed, but I liked it a lot and found it well worth reading.
Chillhunter
This book was not an accurate interpretation of what quantum mechanics should be consisting of
WinDImmortaL
This is a beautifully written book ! Roland Omnes writes with incomparable clarity, he skillfully supports his thesis.
His thesis, his goal, of consistency and completeness: "...consistent as being explicitly free from any logical self-contradiction or paradox, complete as providing a definite prediction for every experimental situation." (Preface). Admittedly, I was reluctant to secure a copy of this book, as I feared forays into "philosophy," a word which I abhor for reasons which would fall outside scope of this review. Happily, this book falls squarely within the confines of physics. Happily, it is a joy to read. I heartily recommend its perusal to all students. Already, in the Appendix to chapter one (elementary quantum mechanics) a student is offered a careful description of the energy-time uncertainty relations (Page 56). Let us read from Roland Omnes:
(1) "The status of probability theory in quantum mechanics is therefore very different from what it is in classical physics, not so much when it comes to their use, but rather when one considers their conceptual nature." (Page 10).
(2) Experimental devices, Second Chapter: Photographic detection, photomultipliers, bubble chambers and Stern-Gerlach. We read: " In measurement theory, an experiment first made by Stern and Gerlach to measure a component of an atomic magnetic moment is such a paradigm. It played a crucial role in confirming the existence of spin and it still remains one of the best and clearest examples in measurement theory." (Page 68). This segues to Von Neumann's formal theory of measurements, presented in as elementary a manner as is feasible !
(3) " Physics proceeds by a theoretical synthesis based upon experimental data, but goes out of their realm when using mathematics. Each one of these two aspects is expressed in a different language, each one being inescapable so that they have to be reconciled." (Page 97).
(4) Third chapter: foundation and principles. Here presented: basics of Hilbert Space and dynamics of quantum mechanics. Read: "We shall define an observable as being any self-adjoint operator acting in the Hilbert Space of the physical system." (Page 114) and "To define the State of a quantum system is a touchy problem." From there learn of Gleason's Theorem: "the existence of a density operator and a specific form for the probabilities," its proof being presented in the Appendix. (Page 121).
(5) Fourth chapter, Histories. "...a series of properties occurring at different times." Roland Omnes pointing out connections with Feynman's "histories."
(6) Logic, next. Roland Omnes reiterates the connection to actual experimental devices: neutron interferometers alongside radioactive decay.(Page 166). And, connection to Feynman's Path Integrals given brief comment (Page 181). The chapter concludes with more formal aspects of logic.
(7) Next, recovering classical physics, read: "The simplest properties of a classical system state that the coordinates and momentum are in a cell in phase space. Such a property does not involve time...our goal will be to associate it with a projector in the collective Hilbert Space. Is this possible ? We shall try to answer this question by using a few elementary considerations." (Page 216). An appendix presents elementary discussion of pseudo-differential operators ( "remarkably well-suited to a study of the correspondence between classical and quantum mechanics" ).
(8) Onward to decoherence: "...it destroys quantum interferences at a macroscopic level...is far from trivial, and will be taken up in several steps." Those steps: intuitive , models and examples, generalities (reiterating connection to Feynman Path Integrals--Page 291). We conclude with explication of the so-called "direction of time," and brief section entitled "Are observables observable ? " (Page 319).
(9) Chapter Nine, Measurement Theory: What is a measurement ? Wave function reduction ( "... a recipe allowing the erasure of irrelevant information...") We read: " Reduction is not itself a physical effect, but a convenient way of speaking." (Page 340). Beautifully written.
(10) Next, Questioning Quantum Mechanics. Here you meet the infamous EPR experiment. Of David Bohm, of hidden variables, of Bell's Inequalities. And much, much, more. Chapter Eleven, Experiments: what a delight, physics and mathematics, from symbols to numbers. We started with experiments and we ended with experiments. Along the way utilizing mathematics to tie it all together. A wonderful mix !
(11) Concluding: Beautifully written, with an eye on both physics and mathematics. Also, exercises for the student to solve. This book should be required reading for all students concurrent to (or, after such) a first exposure to quantum mechanics. Even allowing for differences of opinion,
I greatly enjoyed this book. Highly Recommended !