carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Space and Time in Contemporary Physics: An Introduction to the Theory of Relativity and Gravitation

eBook Space and Time in Contemporary Physics: An Introduction to the Theory of Relativity and Gravitation download

by Moritz Schlick

eBook Space and Time in Contemporary Physics: An Introduction to the Theory of Relativity and Gravitation download ISBN: 0486442837
Author: Moritz Schlick
Publisher: Dover Publications (January 26, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 112
ePub: 1705 kb
Fb2: 1411 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw txt mobi docx
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Physics

Story time just got better with Prime Book Box, a subscription that delivers hand-picked children’s books every 1, 2, or 3. .

Story time just got better with Prime Book Box, a subscription that delivers hand-picked children’s books every 1, 2, or 3 months. Overall, I'd say philosophers of physics and philosophers of science will be interested in chapters 9 and 10. The book, as a whole, being considerably dated, might be useful to a historian of science. I also think that parts of the work may interest a physicist seeking a deeper conceptual exploration than is found in the typical physics text, but that is still familiar to the physicist in its construction.

An authoritative early exposition of relativity theory, this reader-friendly book describes the physical doctrines of the special and general theories of relativity in terms of their philosophic significance. A clear, nonmathematical introduction to a complex subject, this book offers readers of all backgrounds a coherent and informative overview.

Originally published in 1920, Space and Time in Contemporary Physics was philosopher Moritz Schlick’s attempt to elucidate and interpret Einstein’s theory of general relativity

Originally published in 1920, Space and Time in Contemporary Physics was philosopher Moritz Schlick’s attempt to elucidate and interpret Einstein’s theory of general relativity.

Home Browse Books Book details, Space and Time in Contemporary Physics: A.Probably no physical theory in recent times has given rise to more discussion amongst philosophers than the principle of relativity

Home Browse Books Book details, Space and Time in Contemporary Physics: A.Space and Time in Contemporary Physics: An Introduction to the Theory of Relativity and Gravitation. By Moritz Schlick, Henry L. Brose. Probably no physical theory in recent times has given rise to more discussion amongst philosophers than the principle of relativity. One school of thought agrees that physicists may well be led to recast their notions of space and time in the light of experimental results. Another school, however, is of opinion that these questions are no concern of the physicists, who should make their theories fit the philosophers' conceptions of these fundamental units.

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Space And Time in Contemporary Physics An Introduction to the Theory of Relativ. Authors: Moritz Schlick. Categories: Nonfiction.

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

An authoritative early exposition of relativity theory, this reader-friendly book describes . Moritz Schlick, the influential German philosopher and leader of the positivist school of philosophy known as the Vienna Circle, wrote this short work in 1919 specifically to introduce readers unfamiliar with Einstein's theories to the profound importance of the physicist's immense contributions.

Probably no physical theory in recent times has given rise to more discussion amongst philosophers than the principle .

Probably no physical theory in recent times has given rise to more discussion amongst philosophers than the principle of relativity. The theory of relativity consists of two parts, the old special theory, and the more recent general theory.

An authoritative exposition of the theory of relativity, this volume is the work of the leader of the famed Vienna Circle, Moritz Schlick. It offers an accessible approach to the physical doctrines of the special and general theories of relativity, with particular focus on the theories’ philosophic significance.Beginning with an overview of the importance of the Einsteinian theory to the realm of physics, the author proceeds to explain the special principle of relativity, the geometrical relativity of space, the mathematical formulation of spatial relativity, the inseparability of geometry and physics in experience, and the relativity of motion and its connection with inertia and gravitation. Additional topics include the general postulate of relativity and the measure-determinations of the space-time continuum, enunciation and significance of the fundamental law of the new theory, the finiteness of the universe, and the relation of the relativity theory of philosophy.Both as a clear, nonmathematical introduction to a complex subject and a definition of the theories’ philosophical ramifications, this book is outstanding. It will benefit teachers and students of philosophy and physics, along with anyone else who wants a better understanding of the ideas behind Einsteinian physics.
Comments: (7)
Hiylchis
I don't think this is one that most people will want to buy, if they can get it from the library. Of its 87 pages of text, 20 pages are particularly significant and extremely worthwhile: Chapter 9 on "The Finitude of the Universe" and Chapter 10 "Relation to Philosophy." Other than these, the book is largely a very sparse treatment of the conceptual fallout (aka interesting consequences) of Einstein's theory of relativity. I can't say that anything in the book is all that well explicated, but those aforementioned chapters are handled much better than the others. Much of what is found in this book will either be covered by philosophy of physics texts (introductory, even) that deal with relativity in any capacity, and any technical modern physics text (e.g., Thornton and Rex's). I did enjoy Schlick suggestion that we consider expanding shells of light, rather than linear light rays; but, still, Schlick's treatment was all too sparing.

Overall, I'd say philosophers of physics and philosophers of science will be interested in chapters 9 and 10. The book, as a whole, being considerably dated, might be useful to a historian of science. I also think that parts of the work may interest a physicist seeking a deeper conceptual exploration than is found in the typical physics text, but that is still familiar to the physicist in its construction. I recommend this book, but definitely not strongly, only really suggesting that philosophers of physics give it a quick skim for interesting points and take a look at chapters 9 and 10. It's short enough that I have to give it four stars, being that it is worth a lunch-break's read.
Steep
I don't think this is one that most people will want to buy, if they can get it from the library. Of its 87 pages of text, 20 pages are particularly significant and extremely worthwhile: Chapter 9 on "The Finitude of the Universe" and Chapter 10 "Relation to Philosophy." Other than these, the book is largely a very sparse treatment of the conceptual fallout (aka interesting consequences) of Einstein's theory of relativity. I can't say that anything in the book is all that well explicated, but those aforementioned chapters are handled much better than the others. Much of what is found in this book will either be covered by philosophy of physics texts (introductory, even) that deal with relativity in any capacity, and any technical modern physics text (e.g., Thornton and Rex's). I did enjoy Schlick suggestion that we consider expanding shells of light, rather than linear light rays; but, still, Schlick's treatment was all too sparing.

Overall, I'd say philosophers of physics and philosophers of science will be interested in chapters 9 and 10. The book, as a whole, being considerably dated, might be useful to a historian of science. I also think that parts of the work may interest a physicist seeking a deeper conceptual exploration than is found in the typical physics text, but that is still familiar to the physicist in its construction. I recommend this book, but definitely not strongly, only really suggesting that philosophers of physics give it a quick skim for interesting points and take a look at chapters 9 and 10. It's short enough that I have to give it four stars, being that it is worth a lunch-break's read.
Varshav
I don't think this is one that most people will want to buy, if they can get it from the library. Of its 87 pages of text, 20 pages are particularly significant and extremely worthwhile: Chapter 9 on "The Finitude of the Universe" and Chapter 10 "Relation to Philosophy." Other than these, the book is largely a very sparse treatment of the conceptual fallout (aka interesting consequences) of Einstein's theory of relativity. I can't say that anything in the book is all that well explicated, but those aforementioned chapters are handled much better than the others. Much of what is found in this book will either be covered by philosophy of physics texts (introductory, even) that deal with relativity in any capacity, and any technical modern physics text (e.g., Thornton and Rex's). I did enjoy Schlick suggestion that we consider expanding shells of light, rather than linear light rays; but, still, Schlick's treatment was all too sparing.

Overall, I'd say philosophers of physics and philosophers of science will be interested in chapters 9 and 10. The book, as a whole, being considerably dated, might be useful to a historian of science. I also think that parts of the work may interest a physicist seeking a deeper conceptual exploration than is found in the typical physics text, but that is still familiar to the physicist in its construction. I recommend this book, but definitely not strongly, only really suggesting that philosophers of physics give it a quick skim for interesting points and take a look at chapters 9 and 10. It's short enough that I have to give it four stars, being that it is worth a lunch-break's read.