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eBook Quantum Theory (Dover Books on Physics) download

by David Bohm

eBook Quantum Theory (Dover Books on Physics) download ISBN: 0486659690
Author: David Bohm
Publisher: Dover Publications; Revised ed. edition (May 1, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 672
ePub: 1306 kb
Fb2: 1715 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: rtf mbr azw doc
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Physics

I feel sorry for all the poor physics students struggling through their undergraduate quantum mechanics courses without the help of David Bohm

Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). I feel sorry for all the poor physics students struggling through their undergraduate quantum mechanics courses without the help of David Bohm. I bought every quantum mechanics book that I could get my hands on, because I had heard so many horror stories about the difficulty of the subject.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Quantum Theory (Dover Books on Physics) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

It was written by the most radical theoretical physicist in the last 70 years. David Bohm wrote it when he was teaching at Princeton before Oppenheimer's machination got him thrown out of the US to protect Oppenheimer's own communist background (he was also envious of Bohm's genius).

Quantum Theory Dover Books on Physics. Издание: перепечатанное.

David Bohm (), a renowned physicist and theorist, was one of the most original thinkers of the twentieth century. Quantum Theory Dover Books on Physics.

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Part I Physical formulation of the quantum theory 1. The origin of the quantum theory 2. Further developments of the early quantum theory 3. Wave packets and De. . Wave packets and De Broglie waves 4. The definition of probabilities 5. The uncertainty principle 6. Wave vs. particle properties of matter 7. Summary of quantum concepts introduced 8. An attempt to build a physical picture of the quantum  .

This book discusses the mathematical foundations of quantum theories. It offers an introductory. Author of Physics For Dummies. Learn to:, Grasp physics terminology. Get a handle on quantum. Physics II For Dummies. Mathematical Methods in Physics: Distributions, Hilbert Space Operators, Variational Methods, and Applications in Quantum Physics. 92 MB·2,728 Downloads·New! that are needed for courses on modern theoretical physics, such as those on quantum mechanics, classical. Quantum physics HC Verma. 26 MB·4,999 Downloads·New!

Items related to Quantum Theory (Dover Books on Physics)

Items related to Quantum Theory (Dover Books on Physics). David Bohm Quantum Theory (Dover Books on Physics). ISBN 13: 9780486659695. This superb text by David Bohm, formerly Princeton University and Emeritus Professor of Theoretical Physics at Birkbeck College, University of London, provides a formulation of the quantum theory in terms of qualitative and imaginative concepts that have evolved outside and beyond classical theory. Although it presents the main ideas of quantum theory essentially in nonmathematical terms, it follows these with a broad range of specific applications that are worked out in considerable mathematical detail.

This superb text by David Bohm, formerly Princeton University and Emeritus . In Part II, Professor Bohm addresses the mathematical formulation of the quantum theory, examining wave functions, operators, Schrödinger's equation, fluctuations, correlations, and eigenfunctions.

This superb text by David Bohm, formerly Princeton University and Emeritus Professor of Theoretical Physics at Birkbeck College, University of London, provides a formulation of the quantum theory in terms of qualitative and imaginative concepts that have evolved outside and beyond classical theory. Part III takes up applications to simple systems and further extensions of quantum theory formulation, including matrix formulation and spin and angular momentum.

This superb text by David Bohm, formerly Princeton University and Emeritus Professor of Theoretical Physics at Birkbeck College, University of London, provides a formulation of the quantum theory in terms of qualitative and imaginative concepts that have evolved outside and beyond classical theory. Although it presents the main ideas of quantum theory essentially in nonmathematical terms, it follows these with a broad range of specific applications that are worked out in considerable mathematical detail. Addressed primarily to advanced undergraduate students, the text begins with a study of the physical formulation of the quantum theory, from its origin and early development through an analysis of wave vs. particle properties of matter. In Part II, Professor Bohm addresses the mathematical formulation of the quantum theory, examining wave functions, operators, Schrödinger's equation, fluctuations, correlations, and eigenfunctions.Part III takes up applications to simple systems and further extensions of quantum theory formulation, including matrix formulation and spin and angular momentum. Parts IV and V explore the methods of approximate solution of Schrödinger's equation and the theory of scattering. In Part VI, the process of measurement is examined along with the relationship between quantum and classical concepts.Throughout the text, Professor Bohm places strong emphasis on showing how the quantum theory can be developed in a natural way, starting from the previously existing classical theory and going step by step through the experimental facts and theoretical lines of reasoning which led to replacement of the classical theory by the quantum theory.

Comments: (7)
Mustard Forgotten
This is probably the best book on the Copenhagen (the standard orthodoxy) approach to quantum mechanics. It was written by the most radical theoretical physicist in the last 70 years. Bohm wrote it when he was teaching at Princeton before Oppenheimer's machination got him thrown out of the US to protect Oppenheimer's own communist background (he was also envious of Bohm's genius). In the 1940s, there were still extensive discussions about what QM means (all the theorists were comfortable with the various equivalent math approaches but were utterly confused.) The rivalry between Bohr/Heisenberg's view (subsequently called the Copenhagen Interpretation) and the views of Schroedinger, Einstein & de Broglie was brutal; each camp accused the other of producing nonsensical interpretations. Ironically, Bohm (who was a sincere admirer of Einstein and Bohr) created this masterpiece that attempted to explicate the vague, ambiguous ramblings of Bohr by using the mathematics of de Broglie and Schroedinger. In fact, as several reviewers have pointed out, all the math you need is Fourier Analysis but this approach smuggles in all the ideas of electrons as waves. So pay a lot of attention at this point.
The problem here is that (as Bohm admits in his preface) this new view requires a dramatic shift in our fundamental conceptual framework (not just of classical mechanics but ordinary language and the western model of reality as isolated things; both of which can be readily visualized and thus "understood"). Bohm believes he has presented wave mechanics in an understandable and imaginative manner. Unfortunately, this new way of looking at reality is exceedingly difficult so that QM today has regressed to its original mathematical formulation, which is now fully acceptable to math-soaked theoretical physicists.
Bohm's solution is to resurrect Heisenberg's "potentia" approach where quantum objects, no longer have fixed properties that we think about at normal times but they change their character depending on how the electron interacts with other matter. This leads to Bohm's conclusion that at the atomic level (or smaller) the world operates as a single, integrated whole. This is the jumping off point for Bohm's later investigations into the 'Implicate Order' that took the rest of his life to explore.
It was Bohm's intent to present the main ideas of quantum theory in non-mathematical terms rather than as some mysterious, axiomatic set of mathematics "that works". Although this is by far (in my personal opinion & I've been studying QM for 50+ years) the best attempt to provide an explanation he cannot overcome the contradiction (physicists call it a "paradox") that a single object (like an electron) cannot simultaneously BE a localized particle and a wave that extends across all of space. In other words, EXISTENCE is the primary property of reality; objects must first exist (somewhere) before two or more may interact together. The wave-function combines implied mutual existence between TWO electrons (one being in a macro-sized measuring device) with the Broglie's periodic interactivity.
None-the-less, I still highly recommend this book. At the very least, your head will have gone to the 'mental gym' for 12 months getting through it & you will learn all the wrinkles. QM is tough - there are no easy short-cuts as many authors imply.
THIS BOOK PUTS THE LIE TO ALL THOSE "SIMPLE" MATHEMATICAL APPROACHES TO QM - IF YOU HAVE NOT READ THIS BOOK, THEN YOU DO NOT UNDERSTAND QM.
Otrytrerl
Definitely the best introductory QM book out there.Professor Bohm spends the first part of the book explaining the need for QM and the various subtleties of the subject material.He doesn't just throw a bunch of equations at you and ask that you accept them as most other introductory QM texts do(Griffith's QM book is extremely guilty of this) and it is this aspect of the book that really helps set it apart from the rest.This book also helped me to get through Sakurai's more advanced QM textbook.Once you're done with it,you can finally claim to understand QM.Highly recommended.
Samowar
David Bohm was a near-great physicist of the twentieth century. Were it not for a flirtation with Communism in his youth, a dalliance that got him blacklisted in this country, he would have spent his career working with the likes of Wigner, Feynman, Oppenheimer and Einstein and might well have won his own Nobel Prize.

Instead, he went to a post in Brazil where he was able to think deep thoughts about the nature of quantum mechanics. But this is not a philosophy book; it is a textbook aimed at advanced undergraduates, and it hits the bullseye perfectly.

It cogently, carefully and extremely clearly explains both the formalism and mysteries of quantum mechanics. It is the only book on quantum theory that I know of that uses enough words to answer the myriad questions about the "why" of the subject as well as the "how." The antithesis of most QM books that basically say to the student "Don't ask. Shut up and calculate!"

I used this book more than fifty years ago; today it remains useful to good students, at the least as a secondary text to whatever their professor requires. I am delighted but not surprised that Dover has kept it in print and that Amazon keeps it in stock for two day delivery.

Pretty well printed, tho' the type is a bit less than crisp. Decent cover
Heraly
The book by Bohm is fantastic. I took off one star because I bought the kindle version, and the equations are far too small to be read. Also, the index is useless in the kindle version, since it's just a list of words with no links to the right spot in the text.
Erthai
This book has an excellent discussion of the experiments that led to the theoretical development of quantum ideas. The math is on par for an early to mid level undergraduate class class in physics. I appreciate having the mathematics developed in the text, so that there is also a rigorous development of the ideas. There are problems scattered through the text that are reasonable to do after having read the relevant sections. But the prose is excellent, the author really takes time to explain the intuition behind the math. Even if you skip over some or most of the math, one still learns much from the text alone.
Tam
I have to agree completely with Gregory Bravo's review. I feel sorry for all the poor physics students struggling through their undergraduate quantum mechanics courses without the help of David Bohm. I bought every quantum mechanics book that I could get my hands on, because I had heard so many horror stories about the difficulty of the subject. It seems that this is the only book I needed to buy. As it turns out, quantum mechanics is not so difficult, afterall.

Equip yourself with this book, Schaum's Outline on Quantum Mechanics (keeping a keen eye out for errors, mind you), and whatever pathetic excuse for a text you are given, and you should be fine, assuming you have a half-way decent professor. Don't let the fact that this is a dated book lacking Dirac notation deter you. You learn all that notation in QM courses, anyways, so a clear exposition of concepts should be what you want, and no one does it better than David Bohm.
mIni-Like
This is the scientist who plumbed the depths of language to clarify human systems. Read everything he wrote and you will be much the better for the experience.