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eBook Field Guide to the Birds of Peru download

by James F. Clements and Naom Shany,Dana Gardner and Eustace Barnes

eBook Field Guide to the Birds of Peru download ISBN: 0916251837
Author: James F. Clements and Naom Shany,Dana Gardner and Eustace Barnes
Publisher: Sunbelt Publications; 1st edition (June 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1870 kb
Fb2: 1885 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf docx mobi mbr
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Nature and Ecology

Clements and Shany had to somehow create a guide to one of the ecologically diverse countries in the planet .

Now, I consider the Princeton "Birds of Peru" to be a superior choice for birding in this country.

Chicago Distribution Center. A Field Guide to the Birds of Peru. By James F Clements and, Noam Shany; illustrated by, Dana Gardner and, Eustace Barnes. Temecula (California): Ibis Publishing. xvii + 283 p + 128 pl; il. indexes of scientific and English names.

Over 1200 of Peru's 1742 bird species and all 114 endemics are illustrated on the 80 color plates by renowned wildlife artists Dana Gardner and Eustace Barnes. 0934797188 (ISBN13: 9780934797184). The new price will be This superb guide to the most important birding country in the world is now in the final stages of production.

Field Guide to the Bi. .by James F. Clements. Peru harbors almose 1,800 species of birds, including 118 endemics, in every habitat ranging from coast and deserts to 23,000-foot snow-capped Andean peaks, intermontane valleys, lush cloud forests and tropical rainforests The first field guide ever published on the world's most important birding country, and fills a huge gap in our knowledge of South American ornithology.

of Peru: NHBS - James F Clements and Noam Shany, Ibis Publishing Company. By: James F Clements and Noam Shany. Almost 500 of the Peruvian endemic birds and specialities are illustrated in full colour on 128 colour plates by Barnes spanning 256 pages.

By: James F Clements and Noam Shany. 283 pages, 256 pp of col plates. Publisher: Ibis Publishing Company. Illustrations are by Dana Gardner and Eustace Barnes. Field, Identification Guide World, Checklist Out of Print.

The first field guide ever published on the world's most important birding country, and fills a huge gap in our knowledge of South American ornithology. Peru harbors almost 1,800 species of birds, including 118 endemics, in every habitat ranging from coast and deserts to 23,000-foot snow-capped Andean peaks, intermontane valleys, lush cloud forests and tropical rainforests.

James F. Clements, Noam Shany. Are you sure you want to remove Field Guide to the Birds of Peru from your list?

James F. Field Guide to the Birds of Peru Close. Are you sure you want to remove Field Guide to the Birds of Peru from your list? Field Guide to the Birds of Peru. Published June 1, 2001 by Sunbelt Publications.

Barnes illustrierte mehrere Bücher, darunter Pigeons and Doves: A Guide to Pigeons and Doves of the World von David Gibbs (2001), Field Guide to the Birds of Peru von James F. Clements, Naom Shany und Dana Gardner (2001), The Bowerbirds: Ptilonorhynchidae (Bird Families o. Clements, Naom Shany und Dana Gardner (2001), The Bowerbirds: Ptilonorhynchidae (Bird Families of the World) von Clifford Brodie Frith und Dawn Whyatt Frith (2004) und Cotingas and Manakins. von Guy M. Kirwan and Graeme Green (2011). Profil bei BirdQuest.

Clements, James . Shany, Noam; Gardner, Dana & Barnes, Eustace (2001): A Field Guide to the Birds of Peru. Ibis, Temecula, CA. ISBN 34797-18-8. Greeney, Harold . Juiña, Mery & Fernando Sornoza, A. (2006): Nest descriptions for Conothraupis speculigera and Thlypopsis ornata in Ecuador. Boletín de la Sociedad Antioqueña de Ornitología 16(1): 24-29. Ridgely, Robert S & Greenfield, Paul J. (2001): The Birds of Ecuador. Comstock, Ithaca, NY. ISBN 0-8014-8721-8

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of James F Clements books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Birds of the World: Supplement No. 1. James F.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of James F Clements books online. Notify me. Birds of the World.

The first field guide ever published on the world's most important birding country, and fills a huge gap in our knowledge of South American ornithology. Peru harbors almost 1,800 species of birds, including 118 endemics, in every habitat ranging from coast and deserts to 23,000-foot snow-capped Andean peaks, intermontane valleys, lush cloud forests and tropical rainforests. Almost all 1,800 of the species are illustrated on the 127 color plates included in this extensive guide. The text describes the main identification features of each species, plus its range in Peru, preferred habitat, and worldwide range.
Comments: (7)
Globus
Those expecting a Sibley's style field guide with pictures, maps, and bird descriptions all conveniently located on the same page will be disappointed with this guide. Having to go back and forth between picture plates, located in the middle of the volume, and text descriptions at the front or rear of the volume was Herculean pain in the you know what. I got so frustrated with lugging this heavy tomb around the mountains and jungles of Peru that I began to leave it in my lodge and rely more on guides, who also carried the book, for identification. It was easier to focus on the birds for as long as possible and then argue with the guides later over lunch about what we saw.

With that being said, this is the only comprehensive field guide for Peru's 1,800+ species of birds. With it, I saw about 188 different species on 12-day, October 2005 trip to that country. The artwork in the book is generally excellent, and while the descriptions tend to be a bit sparse compared to Sibley's Field Guide to Birds of Eastern North America, they contain all the key identification features. In defense of Clements and Shany, they had to design a guide for 1,800+ birds whereas Sibley's Eastern North America pocket field guide only covers 650 species. Trying to compare the two, in short, is like comparing apples to oranges. Clements and Shany had to somehow create a guide to one of the ecologically diverse countries in the planet and still keep the production costs low enough for Amazon to offer it for just $60.00 (hint: buy it at Amazon or pay much more for it in Peru if you can even find it). Compromises had to be made, but this is still the only birding book to buy for Peru. All others only focus on small regions of the country such as the Machu Picchu area and are not useful for birders hitting multiple venues. Furthermore, the art in the Clements and Shany guide is much, much better than the art found in the regional publications.
Kelenn
I used "A Field Guide to the Birds of Peru" on a recent trip in the Peruvian Amazon. It's a beautiful book, and I found it to be very easy to use.

At the end of the trip, I gave it to my Amazonia Expeditions guide (books degrade quickly in the jungle and require frequent replacement) and bought another copy when I returned to the U.S.. I highly recommend this book.
Vispel
This book has received mixed reviews as in comparison to the Birds of Ecuador it is only half the book. The Field Guide to Birds of Peru is mainly just plates of the nearly 1800 species. The written accounts are sparse, usually only a few lines of text in a section of the book separate from the illustrations. This is one of the main faults of the book as it could have been easily arranged to have the same material opposite the illustrations as in the Ecuador guide rather than just the list of names as in this book.

For the most part I find the illustrations excellent with the exception of some of the alternate illustrators depictions of hummingbirds, shorebirds and gulls as looking a bit ratty with too much feather outline that obscures the birds overall plumage pattern. The Booted Racket-tail is especially unappealing for such a spectacular bird.

Here is an example of the full text comment for one species of woodpecker:
"Crimson-bellied Woodpecker Campephilus haematogaster Carpintero Ventrirrojo 37cm (13.5"). Plate 56 742CD. Unmistakable. note the red underparts, striped face and red rump. Rare in humid montane forests on e slope of Andes at 900-2200m. Panama to e. Peru."

The advantage of this good concise statement is that it is helpful in identifying habit and also definately contributes to the lighter weight of the book. Birds of Ecuador has several paragraphs in addition to a range map for the same species and natural history notes but the book is twice as many pages and twice as heavy.

In comparison Birds of Ecuador is a much better complete field guide but The Field Guide to the Birds of Peru is also a treasure of most of the 1800 species illustrated on it's plates. I am very happy to have the book and am interested to see how the new Princeton Field Guide for Peru will compare.

Added 5/2010: After two trips to Peru I have mostly used the Princeton guide but also used this in a new way. I removed all the text, had it rebound ($7.00 at local office store) in a waterproof binding with just the plates. This helped as it was light enough now to carry in the field (still a problem with the Princeton guide) and it was handy to study before the trip. Another frustration with this book is that in several instances the species are all not grouped on the same plates. For example some gulls are on one plate (with albatrosses) and then not show again until the middle of the plates. This is repeated several times with ducks, barbets, flowerpiercers, etc. very frustrating!
Light out of Fildon
Well, it's good that there is a field guide for Peru, finally. But if you think standards would have gone up since the days of "Birds of Venezuela" or "Birds of Colombia", you are in for some considerable disappointment. For one thing, there is a great difference in the quality of the plates. Some of the plates are truly excellent, while others are simply terrible by today's standards. Many of them look like they have been done in a hurry. Often, the plates look flat and the colors are way too bright without the differentiations one would expect. Of course, the plates will still be helpful for identification of the species. But often, the actual bird looks considerably different. Texts are extremely brief, usually not more than 3 to 5 lines! There is no information about voices except for a number sometimes, referring to a list of recordings. There are no range maps. In sum, if you had hoped for the definitive book on the birds of Peru, keep waiting. This is not it. And since many of the plates in "Birds of Ecuador" are also somewhat disappointing, a really satisfying bird guide for Peru, and its surrounding countries still remains to be written. I understand that the originals of those plates that were done by Barnes looked considerably better. Thus, it seems, there might be a chance for an improved second edition, at least as far as color renditions are concerned. Of course, if you plan to travel to the area now, you do need the present edition, anyway.

Edit January 2010: There has been a fine alternative now for some time. So just get that Princeton guide, as others have said as well.