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eBook Walking download

by Henry David Thoreau

eBook Walking download ISBN: 160512088X
Author: Henry David Thoreau
Publisher: Akasha Classics (May 30, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 108
ePub: 1892 kb
Fb2: 1374 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: docx rtf lrf lit
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Nature and Ecology

Henry David Thoreau crafted essays that reflect his speculative and probing cast of mind. 17 people found this helpful.

Henry David Thoreau crafted essays that reflect his speculative and probing cast of mind. In his poems, he gave voice to his private sentiments and spiritual aspirations in the plain style of New England speech. Now, The Library of America brings together these indispensable works in one authoritative volume.

Walking (Full Text) Lyrics. I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil-to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society. I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks-who had a genius, so to speak, for SAUNTERING, which word is beautifully derived "from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la Sainte Terre

Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American essayist, poet, and philosopher.

Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American essayist, poet, and philosopher. A leading transcendentalist, he is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay "Civil Disobedience" (originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government"), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state.

I liked it that Thoreau sorted life into the sacred and the profane, the true and the trivial, the living and the dead

I liked it that Thoreau sorted life into the sacred and the profane, the true and the trivial, the living and the dead. Take the opening paragraphs of his essay Walking : I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil,-to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society. Poems and novels are not what concern me here, however.

Walking, or sometimes referred to as "The Wild", is a lecture by Henry David Thoreau first delivered at the Concord Lyceum on April 23, 1851. It was written between 1851 and 1860, but parts were extracted from his earlier journals. Thoreau read the piece a total of ten times, more than any other of his lectures. Walking" was first published as an essay in the Atlantic Monthly after his death in 1862.

Walking Quotes Showing 1-30 of 82. Wildness is the preservation of the World. Henry David Thoreau, Walking. Genius is a light which makes the darkness visible, like the lightning’s flash, which perchance shatters the temple of knowledge itself,-and not a taper lighted at the hearth-stone of the race, which pales before the light of common day. ― Henry David Thoreau, Walking.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Henry David Thoreau : A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers Walden; Or, Life in the Woods The Maine Woods Cape Cod (Library of America). 2 Mb. The Writings of Henry David Thoreau in 20 Volumes. Категория: philosophy, social sciences. 1. 8 Mb. 1 Mb.

First published in 1862 in The Atlantic Monthly. I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil - to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society.

Walking, by Henry David Thoreau - Akasha Classics, AkashaPublishing.Com - I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil - to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society. I wish to make an extreme statement, if so I may make an emphatic one, for there are enough champions of civilization: the minister and the school committee and every one of you will take care of that. I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks - who had a genius, so to speak, for SAUNTERING, which word is beautifully derived "from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la Sainte Terre," to the Holy Land, till the children exclaimed, "There goes a Sainte-Terrer," a Saunterer, a Holy-Lander. They who never go to the Holy Land in their walks, as they pretend, are indeed mere idlers and vagabonds; but they who do go there are saunterers in the good sense, such as I mean. Some, however, would derive the word from sans terre without land or a home, which, therefore, in the good sense, will mean, having no particular home, but equally at home everywhere. For this is the secret of successful sauntering. He who sits still in a house all the time may be the greatest vagrant of all; but the saunterer, in the good sense, is no more vagrant than the meandering river, which is all the while sedulously seeking the shortest course to the sea. But I prefer the first, which, indeed, is the most probable derivation. For every walk is a sort of crusade, preached by some Peter the Hermit in us, to go forth and reconquer this Holy Land from the hands of the Infidels.
Comments: (7)
Nilasida
This is a must read book - it should be required reading for everybody to graduate high school and college. The author's writing style and the old English can be a little challenging in spots, but not too difficult. It is a very enjoyable read that takes the reader to another place spiritually and philosophically. It discusses the very important topic of how we interact with nature, and our bond with nature, as well as the importance of protecting and conserving wild places. It gives a much needed point of view that is rare to find these days and perhaps needed now more than ever. Most of all it is a celebration of appreciating and enjoying the great outdoors (without killing or destroying), simply finding peace and joy in the natural beauty that is around us which so many of us neglect. A real gem that just might stir or awaken something inside of you. You will want to explore or go for a walk in the woods after reading this.
Blackredeemer
Wonderful thoughts on innovation and aspiration and who we really are. The concluding sentence is the best thing this side of the last sentence of the Great Gatsby. My high school self was wrong about Thoreau.
Melipra
The book I received did not look like the picture. It was far better! Same content of course, but it is a beautiful looking book.
Moralsa
An tribute to Nature and a call to the civilized man to express his true nature and individuality. I'm enriched, influenced and entertained by Thoreau's works and this one is no exception. Free from the herd metality, his observations and ideals sets you thinking. This book is about walking - sauntering through the higlands of the mind as well as through the pristine nature here on earth.

Random sampling from the book:

- Our expeditions are but tours, and come round again at evening to the old hearth-side from which we set out. Halk the walk is but retracing the steps.

- The landscape-painter uses the figures of men to mark a road. He would not make that use of my figure. I walk out into a nature such as the old prophets and poets, Menu, Moses, Homer, Chaucer, walked in.

- At present, in this vicinity, the best part of the land is not private property; the landscape is not owned and the walker enjoys comprative freedom. But possibly the day will come when it will be partitioned off into so-called pleasure grounds, in which a few will take a narrow and exclusive pleasure only - when fences shall be multiplied, and man-traps and other engines invented to confine men to the PUBLIC road, and walking over the surface of God's earth shall be construed to mean trespassing on some gentleman's grounds. To enjoy a thing exclusively is to exclude yourself from the true enjoyment of it.

- Hope and future for me are not in lawns and cultivated fields, not in towns and cities, but in the impervious and quaking swamps.

- ...for what is most of our boasted so-called knowledge but a conceit that we know something, which robs us of the advantages of our actual ignorance
Lanadrta
Do you LOVE to walk @ a leisurely pace? Or hike just for the sake of getting outdoors & connecting with
yourself, the world around you? Then this is the book for you!! Me thinks( a Thoreauism) all bipeds who love the art of walking in all its glorious forms should have this in their library..with life today so over-burdening & stressful, who SHOULD'NT take up walking?? To walk, saunter or pace is refreshing, energizing, and there are many studies proving its therapeutic & health value. Its written to reflect the time in which he lived( pre-Civil War), so some of his grammar/ expressions are antiquated, but have value today. BIPEDS~LOVE YOUR FEET!! Get this book- and kindle your love of walking today!
Nirad
As someone who does a lot of back country hiking, this is like a walk, but inside your own head. I have. A shirt that says, I hike to burn off the crazy, perhaps Henry and I are somehow related. My advice, kick back and enjoy!
Weernis
Be aware that this dark-blue-cloth "Library of America" hardcover edition (whose spine--but not the front cover--is tastefully stamped with gold characters) exists in TWO very different-looking versions: (1) in the largely black dust jacket pictured on Amazon's product page, with no slipcase; or (2) in a fairly fancy, cream-colored slipcase, without the dust jacket. Thus, before placing your order, you might want to ask the seller WHICH version they're selling--especially if you want this volume to visually match its noteworthy "companion" (ISBN 0940450275, which comprises all four of Thoreau's full-length books--A WEEK ON THE CONCORD & MERRIMACK RIVERS; WALDEN; THE MAINE WOODS; and CAPE COD), which likewise exists in two such versions.

Another reviewer questioned this hardcover's durability and price. Regarding its DURABILITY per se, the prospective buyer needn't fret about anything whatsoever [including the paper's (satisfyingly sufficient) thickness and quality]. Library of America's hardcovers are very well made! Regarding the PRICE, however, it indeed seems gallingly steep, at least to notoriously frugal souls like me.

Even so, presently this book--to my knowledge--constitutes the best and most comprehensive single-volume compilation of HDT's essays [not to mention his (infinitely less significant) poetry] for the layperson.

In pursuit of HDT's beloved virtue of "simplicity," consummate Thoreauvians would, arguably, fare best by owning just two (or perhaps three) publications:

(1) this "Library of America" edition of HDT's COLLECTED ESSAYS AND POEMS (ISBN 1883011957);

(2) the "Library of America" single-volume edition of HDT's four full-length books [A WEEK ON THE CONCORD AND MERRIMACK RIVERS; WALDEN; THE MAINE WOODS; and CAPE COD (ISBN 0940450275)]; and perhaps,

(3) HDT's complete (14-volume) JOURNAL (ISBN 0879051736).

With just those three editions, we've--essentially--got "THE" works of Henry David Thoreau on our shelf.