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eBook Wild Forests: Conservation Biology And Public Policy download

by William S. Alverson,Don Waller,Walter Kuhlmann

eBook Wild Forests: Conservation Biology And Public Policy download ISBN: 1559631872
Author: William S. Alverson,Don Waller,Walter Kuhlmann
Publisher: Island Press; 1 edition (July 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 323
ePub: 1270 kb
Fb2: 1435 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mobi mbr rtf lrf
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Nature and Ecology

Wild Forests - William S. Alverson. This book reflects a somewhat unique marriage of science and public policy

Wild Forests - William S. This book reflects a somewhat unique marriage of science and public policy. Too often, those concerned about protecting diversity in our forests, whether as activists or agency personnel, have been schooled in one element of the debate over diversity, leaving them ill-equipped to address the full range of issues relevant to protecting diversity through forest management.

Start by marking Wild Forests: Conservation Biology And Public Policy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

William S. Alverson, Don Waller, and Walter Kuhlmann. 323 pages 6 x 9. The Wisdom of the Spotted Owl. Policy Lessons For A New Century. The controversy over the management of national forests in the Pacific Northwest vividly demonstrates the shortcomings of existing management institutions and natural resource policies.

by William S. Alverson, Don Waller, Walter Kuhlmann. The authors examine past and current practices of forest management and provide a comprehensive overview of known and suspected threats to diversity.

WS Alverson, DM Waller, SL Solheim. Wild forests: conservation biology and public policy. WS Alverson, D Waller, W Kuhlmann. Conservation Biology 2 (4), 348-358, 2005. Direct and indirect effects of white-tailed deer in forest ecosystems. TP Rooney, DM Waller. Forest ecology and management 181 (1-2), 165-176, 2003.

Wild forests: conservation biology and public policy. The book is well-written and compelling as it builds from principles of conservation biology to a history and critique of forest management and policy. Island Press, Washington . Scientists can play many roles in public policy debates, from expert witnesses to members of advisory committees. It climaxes in the descrip-tion of a new approach to forest management and the case history of the Wisconsin National Forest controversy.

The authors examine past and currpractices of forest managemand provide a comprehensive overview of known and suspected threats to diversity.

Alverson, William Surprison, Walter Kuhlmann, and Donald M. Waller. Washington, DC: Island Press, 1994. Angermeier, Paul L. Does Biodiversity Include Artificial Diversity? Conservation Biology (1994): 600–602. Angermeier, Paul . and James R. Karr. Biological Integrity Versus Biological Diversity as Policy Directives. BioScience 44, no. 10 (1994): 690–97. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Barnett, Harold . and Chandler Morse.

Wild Forests presents a coherent review of the scientific and policy issues surrounding biological diversity in the context of contemporary public forest management. The authors examine past and current practices of forest management and provide a comprehensive overview of known and suspected threats to diversity.

In addition to discussing general ecological principles, the authors evaluate specific approaches to forest management that have been proposed to ameliorate diversity losses. They present one such policy -- the Dominant Use Zoning Model incorporating an integrated network of "Diversity Maintenance Areas" -- and describe their attempts to persuade the U.S. Forest Service to adopt such a policy in Wisconsin.

Drawing on experience in the field, in negotiations, and in court, the authors analyze the ways in which federal agencies are coping with the mandates of conservation biology and suggest reforms that could better address these important issues. Throughout, they argue that wild or unengineered conditions are those that are most likely to foster a return to the species richness that we once enjoyed.