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by V.G. Boltyanskii,V.A. Efremovich,J. Stillwell,A. Shenitzer

eBook Intuitive Combinatorial Topology (Universitext) download ISBN: 0387951148
Author: V.G. Boltyanskii,V.A. Efremovich,J. Stillwell,A. Shenitzer
Publisher: Springer; 2001 edition (March 30, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 142
ePub: 1987 kb
Fb2: 1461 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt lrf mobi lrf
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Mathematics

Efremovich, J. Stillwell, A. Shenitzer.

Efremovich, J. Topology is a relatively young and very important branch of mathematics. It studies properties of objects that are preserved by deformations, twistings, and stretchings, but not tearing. This book deals with the topology of curves and surfaces as well as with the fundamental concepts of homotopy and homology, and does this in a lively and well-motivated way. There is hardly an area of mathematics that does not make use of topological results and concepts. The importance of topological methods for different areas of physics is also.

Efremovich ; translated by Abe Shenitzer

Efremovich ; translated by Abe Shenitzer. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Intuitive combinatorial topology is conceived as a popular introduction to the aims, methods and concerns of topology. The authors’ aim throughout this copiously illustrated book is to build intuition rather than go overboard on the technical aspects of the subject: this enables them to cover a lot of materia. .I particularly liked the way in which certain themes recurre.it does merit a place in the librarie.Nick Lord, The Mathematical Gazette, Vol. 87 (509), 2003). The text is written in an enthusiastic and lively style.

Автор: J. Stillwell; A. Shenitzer; . The book is well suited not only as preparation for students who plan to take a course in algebraic topology but also for advanced undergraduates or beginning graduates interested in finding out what topology is all about. The book has more than 200 problems, many examples, and over 200 illustrations. The authors' aim throughout this copiously illustrated book is to build intuition rather than go overboard on the technical aspects of the subject: this enables them to cover a lot of material. I particularly liked the way in which certain themes recurred. it does merit a place in the libraries.

Topology is a relatively young and very important branch of mathematics, which studies the properties of objects that are preserved through deformations, twistings, and stretchings. This book is well suited for readers who are interested in finding out what topology is all about. Users who liked this book, also liked. Rational Homotopy Theory (English)

Geometrical Combinatorial Topology. 1 INSTITUT DES HAUTES ETUDE~ SCIENTIFIQUES Seminar on Combinatorial Topology by E. C. ZEEMAN. Report "Intuitive combinatorial topology".

Geometrical Combinatorial Topology. A Combinatorial Introduction to Topology.

The book is well suited not only as preparation for students who plan to take a course in algebraic topology but also for advanced undergraduates or beginning . Translated by. A.

The book is well suited not only as preparation for students who plan to take a course in algebraic topology but also for advanced undergraduates or beginning graduates interested in finding out what topology is all about.

Intuitive Combinatorial Topology Translated from the Russian by Abe . This book was prepared for publication by .

Intuitive Combinatorial Topology Translated from the Russian by Abe Shenitzer. Efremovich Abe Shenitzer (translator) ClMAT (deceased) Department of Mathematics . 402 York University Guan;yuato, Gto. North York, Ontario M3J IP3 36000 Mexico Canada boltiantal. Boltyanskir, who reworked and supplemented the material in our Short Survey. I wish to take this opportunity to express my deep thanks to him. I also wish to thank .

Efremovich,J Stillwell from Bookswagon. Lowest price and Replacement Guarantee.

Topology is a relatively young and very important branch of mathematics, which studies the properties of objects that are preserved through deformations, twistings, and stretchings. This book deals with the topology of curves and surfaces as well as with the fundamental concepts of homotopy and homology, and does this in a lively and well-motivated way. This book is well suited for readers who are interested in finding out what topology is all about.
Comments: (2)
Bynelad
The material covered in this book is rather outdated -- the first two-thirds of the book focuses on the topology of curves and surfaces, which people studied in the 19th century. Then in the last third, it tries to cover as much early twentieth-century topology as possible, with mixed results. On the other hand, 19th century topology is fun. Modern topology tends to involve very abstract heavy machinery, at the cost of being able to play with simple, very geometric structures.

A high school student or young undergraduate would greatly enjoy this book -- it is filled with beautiful pictures, with very intuitive proofs of some basic but important theorems. The numerous exercises are also great for building geometric intuition for classical topology. But, largely due to the outdatedness of the material, an advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate student who is looking for a book with (admittedly far fewer) pretty pictures would be better off reading more modern texts like Guillemin and Pollack's Differential Topology (AMS Chelsea Publishing) Hatcher's Algebraic Topology.
Clandratha
This short, elementary survey of topology is meant to be accessible for the most part to high school students and beginning undergraduates. I hope that such unspoiled souls will have the courage to be dissatisfied at least with the first chapter, since it cares only about concepts (continuity, homeomorphism, etc.) while offering little substance, and also there is the usual overemphasis of the Jordan curve theorem and pathological curves. Young people should not be tricked into thinking that topology has been built around such silly things. But in the other two chapters we get to actual topology, and all the usual stuff is here: Euler characteristic, classification of surfaces, knots, the fundamental group, homology, etc. Each topic is treated in a relatively sensible, swift manner; rather too swift towards the end, I think, when there seems to be a race to include as many topological concepts as possible, with little concern for what would be the most natural or interesting way to proceed (of course this does not have to be a bad thing if one is using the book as a down-to-earth complement to a formal textbook).