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eBook Statistics Hacks: Tips Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds download

by Bruce Frey

eBook Statistics Hacks: Tips  Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds download ISBN: 0596101643
Author: Bruce Frey
Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (May 19, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 358
ePub: 1392 kb
Fb2: 1142 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt rtf mbr doc
Category: Math Sciences
Subcategory: Mathematics

You'll learn how to: Play smart when you play Texas Hold 'Em, blackjack, roulette, dice games, or even the lottery. Design your own winnable bar bets to make money and amaze your friends. Predict the outcomes of baseball games, know when to "go for two" in football, and anticipate the winners of other sporting events with surprising accuracy.

Bruce Frey's collection of tips and tools makes the subject interesting, fun- even funny- and most importantly, approachable. Every hack is illustrated with some example, including many relating to gambling, games, and bar bets.

Statistics Hacks book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Statistics Hacks: Tips & Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Электронная книга "Statistics Hacks: Tips & Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds", Bruce Frey. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Statistics Hacks: Tips & Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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What are the best books about Statistics? We looked at 145 of the top Statistics books, aggregating and ranking . Statistics Hacks: Tips & Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds.

Statistics Hacks: Tips & Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds.

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Manufacturer: O'Reilly Media Release date: 16 May 2006 ISBN-10 : 0596101643 ISBN-13: 9780596101640.

Statistics Hacks : Tips and Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds. Bruce Frey's collection of tips and tools makes the subject interesting, fun- even funny- and most importantly, approachable

Statistics Hacks : Tips and Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds. Bruce Frey's collection of tips and tools makes the subject interesting, fun- even funny- and most importantly, approachable.

Want to calculate the probability that an event will happen? Be able to spot fake data? Prove beyond doubt whether one thing causes another? Or learn to be a better gambler? You can do that and much more with 75 practical and fun hacks packed into Statistics Hacks. These cool tips, tricks, and mind-boggling solutions from the world of statistics, measurement, and research methods will not only amaze and entertain you, but will give you an advantage in several real-world situations-including business.

This book is ideal for anyone who likes puzzles, brainteasers, games, gambling, magic tricks, and those who want to apply math and science to everyday circumstances. Several hacks in the first chapter alone-such as the "central limit theorem,", which allows you to know everything by knowing just a little-serve as sound approaches for marketing and other business objectives. Using the tools of inferential statistics, you can understand the way probability works, discover relationships, predict events with uncanny accuracy, and even make a little money with a well-placed wager here and there.

Statistics Hacks presents useful techniques from statistics, educational and psychological measurement, and experimental research to help you solve a variety of problems in business, games, and life. You'll learn how to:

Play smart when you play Texas Hold 'Em, blackjack, roulette, dice games, or even the lotteryDesign your own winnable bar bets to make money and amaze your friendsPredict the outcomes of baseball games, know when to "go for two" in football, and anticipate the winners of other sporting events with surprising accuracyDemystify amazing coincidences and distinguish the truly random from the only seemingly random--even keep your iPod's "random" shuffle honestSpot fraudulent data, detect plagiarism, and break codesHow to isolate the effects of observation on the thing observed

Whether you're a statistics enthusiast who does calculations in your sleep or a civilian who is entertained by clever solutions to interesting problems, Statistics Hacks has tools to give you an edge over the world's slim odds.

Comments: (7)
Thordibandis
It's not very easy to use the words "entertaining" and "statistics" in the same sentence, but you can if you're talking about this book. Bruce Frey's collection of tips and tools makes the subject interesting, fun-- even funny-- and most importantly, approachable.

It's important to understand that this book is not intended to be a statistics textbook, review, or reference manual. Rather, it is a collection of bite-sized hacks that relate statistical principles to the "real" world. Every hack is illustrated with some example, including many relating to gambling, games, and bar bets. Which properties should you buy in Monopoly? The answer is here, along with an explanation. How many people have to be in a room with you before you can be pretty sure that at least one of them shares your birthday? That's here, too, along with the explanation. Is there a way to predict the winner of a baseball game by listening to about twenty minutes of the middle of it? Yep.

If you're looking for an authoritative, comprehensive, serious statistics text, keep shopping. If you're looking for a light but nonetheless very useful explanation/review of how and why statistics work in a real-world context, buy this book.

I'm glad I bought it, and I'd do it again. I got more than enough entertainment and utility out of it to justify the expense.
Reemiel
75 four-page sections on topics in statistics and probability, some textbook and some "popular science" and some nicely different. Brisk user-friendly style. Provides a useful view of a big picture of statistics for someone who's taken a dull statistics course in college. But this potentially great book is spoiled by too many misleading statements (almost everything we measure in the natural world [follows] the normal curve (#25); the more instances you can get [in a multiple regression analysis] the more accurate your eventual predictions will be (#55)). Wikipedia entries on the topics will probably be better written and more accurate.
Glei
my favorite stats book
Lahorns Gods
I have been teaching statistics for quite a while. I picked up this book thinking that I would find some good examples and methods of explanation that would help in presenting concepts to students. However, the examples are not any better than you would find in a textbook, except that they are missing the many of the details. If you wanted to try to do some analysis based on what you find in the book you would have a hard time.

If I were a person that bought this book thinking it would help me understand statistics better, I believe I would be disappointed.
Mash
I'm not a statistics expert, but in the first 10 pages of this book I've already found two significant errors, the latter of which is particularly horrendous. Either the author is clueless about statistics -- a frightening thought since he supposedly teaches statistics as a professor -- or the editing of this book by statistics-clueful people was basically nonexistent. I'll assume the latter, but either way, this book is a blot on O'Reilly's record.

Page 5:
"The mean will be close to some scores and far away from some others, but if you add up those distances, you get a total that is as small as possible."

Wrong. The mean minimizes the sum of SQUARED distances; the MEDIAN minimizes the sum of the distances. Hand-waving on the next page apologizing for how complicated the formula for the standard deviation is because "there are some mathematical complications with summing distances" would suggest to me that the omission of "squared" on page 5 was not a mere typo or a misguided attempt at simplification.

OK, sure, one error like that isn't worth trashing a book over, particularly a book for lay people (albeit those with a technical bent). But check out this howler on page 10:

"Additive rule: the probability of any one of several independent events occuring is the *sum* of each event's probability." [Emphasis on "sum" is the book's, not mine.]

This isn't just plain wrong; it's cringe-inducingly, forehead-slappingly wrong. The additive rule is for any one of several mutually exclusive events occuring, and independent pretty much implies *not* mutually exclusive (the annoying corner cases being those where some events under consideration are completely impossible anyhow). The rule for one of several independent events occuring is more complicated; for example, the probability of a fair coin coming up "heads" on either its first or second flip is obviously not 1, as the author's statement would ridiculously imply, but rather 3/4.

In order to do anything with statistics at all, you absolutely MUST understand the basic concepts of "independent" and "mutually exclusive", or you're doomed from the get-go. The fact that this book is for lay people who might not already be clear on these concepts only makes having such an error in it that much less excusable.

If the author can't be bothered to stamp out obvious errors like this in the first 10 pages -- particularly the latter -- I can't be bothered to read the rest of it. Maybe the second edition will be worth glancing at, but I'm not holding my breath. (For one thing, the overall writing style in that first 10 pages wasn't particularly lucid either.)